Germanic Languages and Literatures

Dutch Courses (Division 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text Levend Nederlands (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To strengthen the command of the language, grammatical patterns in conversation will be emphasized. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with songs of Dutch singers and cabaret artists, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. (Broos)

339. Independent Study. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Dutch Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Courses in the past covered different areas like Dutch-Indonesian literature, the language of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, Dutch between English and German, etc. Courses must be supervised by a faculty member and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. (Ton Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (HU).

HOW TO FIND YOUR OWN VOICE AS A WRITER. A course in creative writing by this year's Dutch writer in residence. Classes will be conducted in English and will consist of both reading and writing assignments based on American and translated Dutch examples. (Dorrestein)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine the poetry and prose of both The Netherlands and Belgium in modern times. The reading of poems, short stories, novellas, etc. in the original language will provide the student with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and points of view of Modern Dutch Literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his work. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students are provided with opportunities to practice using German in a range of situations frequently encountered in German-speaking cultures. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. It is highly recommended that students use taped exercises available in the Language Laboratory. There are five chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write one short composition and present a brief dialogue in German.

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. See German 101 for more details. There are four chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write two short compositions, present a brief dialogue in German, and read selections that explore some cultural differences between life in the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States.

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of scientific texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. (Section 001 Schelle; Section 002 Hofacker)

230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 221, 222, 231, or 232. (8). (FL).

This course provides highly motivated and linguistically talented students the opportunity to complete the two-term intermediate German sequence in one term. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss short German prose as well as two longer works with the benefit of English equivalents for complicated passages. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. There are three hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination for each term sequence. Students write and rewrite five essays on topics of personal interest; two other essays are written in class. The language of instruction is German.

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss short German prose as well as a longer work with the benefit of English equivalents for complicated passages. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. There are three hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination. Students write and rewrite two essays on topics of personal interest; the third and last essay is written in class. The language of instruction is German.

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 236. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. See German 231 for more details. Students write and rewrite three essays on topics of personal interest; the fourth and last essay is written in class.

236. Scientific German. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 232. (4). (FL).

The purpose of this course is to provide basic practice in the reading and translation of texts primarily from the natural sciences. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation. Students will also select and translate an outside article in their field. Quizzes are given in addition to a final exam. Texts supplied by instructor. (Stahlheber)

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations.

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

Except by special permission of the instructor, only students who have completed German 325 should elect 326. See 325 for the description.

351. Business German. German 232. (3). (Excl).

The course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and practices of procedures used in German business, industry, trade, banking and insurance and the journals, newspapers and reports covering their activities. The subjects covered range from advertising to financial transactions and reports. The course is a continuation of German 350 which is not a prerequisite to 351 The text will consist of readings from actual German business reports and transactions taken from journals, newspapers and professional journals and advertising. The emphasis in the course will be on banking, commerce and international trade. There will be a selected list of outside reading in English such as William Manchester's The Arms of Krupp and others. (Fabian)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (HU).

While the readings are determined by the availability of texts, they are selected and discussed as examples of the most significant and influential writers and movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. The latter includes Naturalism, Expressionism, the "Epic Theater," and the "Theater of the Absurd." The dramatists usually included are: Georg Buechner, Gerhart Hauptmann, Georg Kaiser, Bertolt Brecht, Max Frisch, and Friedrich Duerrenmatt. In each case the instructor will provide all necessary background materials. In turn, students will be responsible only for close and accurate reading of the individual texts. Grades will be based on class discussions, a midterm examination, a final examination, and a term paper. (Cowen)

383. German Lyric Poetry. German 232 or permission of department. (3). (HU).

This course introduces students to German lyric poetry, a genre in which the German-speaking countries have made some of their most significant contributions to world literature. There will be special emphasis on poetry from the age of Goethe through the 20th century, but also a few examples of earlier and more recent poems will also be included. One class hour per week for approximately the first half of the term will be devoted to study of a theoretical handbook (Wolfgang Kayser, Kleine deutsche Versschule) in order to familiarize students with the technical aspects of literary analysis. The primary focus of the course will be on contrastive analysis of individual poems from the anthology Deutsche Gedichte, ed. Echtermeyer/von Wiese. Additional mimeographed materials will also be used. The course format is guided discussion with occasional background lectures. While the instructor will normally speak German, students may use English in discussion if necessary. Papers and examinations will be written in English. There will be two short interpretive papers, a midterm and a final examination. (Seidler)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. (Grilk)

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 425 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Various approaches are used to improve the student's written and spoken German. Each week a composition of at least two pages is assigned. Sometimes the instructor assigns a specific topic while at other times students select their own topics. Occasionally students are required to listen, in the language laboratory, to a tape on some aspect of German history or culture and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and the students. Brief presentations by individual students are required. German is used exclusively in class. The final course grade is based on compositions as well as participation in discussion. German 425 is regularly offered during the Fall Term while German 426 is regularly offered during the Winter Term. German 426 may be taken independently of 425. (Weiss)

452(475). German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Senior standing. (3). (HU).

The course presents various aspects of a great period which is rich in contrasts and abundant in significant literary works which have still a bearing on our time. In Rococo poetry, e.g., man asserts his resolve to enjoy life, to indulge in the light-hearted pleasures of our existence, while in the drama of the era, the young generation revolts against the oppression by the establishment, etc. Although the course has to be selective with regard to the material presented, the selection should enable the students to get an overall picture of the period. The assigned readings will be introduced and discussed in class. Instructor will speak German, students have the option. The division of the time between lectures and discussions will be flexible depending on the composition of the class. The syllabus will be discussed at the first meeting. There will be an option between a final examination and term papers. (Schelle)

454(466). German Romanticism. 3 years of college German; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the contributions of romanticism to German literary and cultural history. Attention will also be paid to the social and political conditions of the period. Readings will primarily consist of selected fiction and poetry. Students are expected to have completed at least three years of college level German, or the equivalent. They will be encouraged to participate in class discussions for which there should be ample opportunity. (Weiss)

457(442). Twentieth Century German Fiction. Junior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The main purpose of this course is to provide a survey of the various authors, movements, styles, attitudes, etc. prevalent in postwar German prose to advanced students in German via the (relatively) short narrative form. The scope will encompass the two generations of postwar writers. Central themes will include: 1) the interrelation between narrative style and chronology; 2) comparison of the two groups; 3) the interaction between literature and ideology so significant to the postwar era in Germany; 4) the problems of linguistic insufficiency; 5) generic classification of short forms examined; 6) audience and reception of the works. Basic method of instruction will be discussion, along with occasional lectures. Evaluation will be based on class participation, two papers (one short interpretation of 5-7 pages, one long research paper of 10-15 pages), and a final examination. Authors to be read include Guenter Grass, Heinrich Boell, Uwe Johnson, Peter Handke, Thomas Bernhard, Anna Seghers, Christa Wolf, Ingeborg Bachmann, Gabriele Wohnmann, Imrtraud Morgner, and others. No special background is required, but considerable fluency in German is necessary. The course is an elective. (Fries)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a literary topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. If the work is judged to be of Honors caliber, an Honors citation is also awarded. (Crichton)

499. Seminar in German Studies. Permission of instructor. (3). (HU).
Section 001 German Thought from Marx to Wittgenstein (in English Translation).
No prerequisites. In this course we shall focus upon the main figures in German thought from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. Other thinkers to be covered include the Left and Right Hegelians, Engels, Schopenhauer, Wagner, Husserl, Kandinsky, Benjamin, Bloch, and Adorno. Two lectures per week, plus one discussion section: about two-thirds of the material covered in lectures will be assigned as reading. One research/interpretive paper will be required. The course is intended as an introduction to this important tradition for German majors and non-majors alike. The course may be elected in fulfillment of the Junior-Senior ECB writing requirement. (Amrine)

504. History of the German Language. Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course focuses on the phonological, morphological, syntactic and lexical changes which affected the precursors of modern German. Although all periods from Proto-Indo-European to contemporary German will be covered, the emphasis will be on the Old/Middle High German and Early Modern German periods. The social, political, and economic correlates of linguistic change will receive considerable attention as well. The course is intended for graduate students, but is open to juniors and seniors. Course requirements include periodic quizzes, and a research paper of approximately 20 pages in length. Prerequisites are German 415, Linguistics 211 or equivalent, or the permission of the instructor. Readings: Norbert Richard Wolf, Geschichte der deutschen Sprache, 1: Althochdeutsch-Mittelhochdeutsch (Heidelberg: Quelle und Meyer, 1981), and a course pack. (Born)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

320. German Expressionism in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; sophomores by permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the intellectual, social, and literary and political events in Germany from 1900 to 1930. The subjects covered will include the various forms of art and how they relate to each other and to the cultural and political climate of Germany during that time. Special emphasis will be given to those aspects of the period which eventually proved to be of significant influence on American culture. The format of the course includes lectures and discussion. Included in the course will be the viewing of films of the most important film directors of the time such as Lubitsch, Land, Murnau, Wiene, Pabts, Lamprecht, and Ruttmann, and films indicative of the period but not generally available such as: Siegfried, Nosferatu, Roskolnikow, The Cursed, Pandora's Box, Pitz Palu, and Spies, among others. A term paper or a final examination will be required. (Fabian)

375/MARC 375/Rel. 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology. (3). (HU).

See Religion 375. (Beck)

442. Faust and the Faust Legend in English Translation. Junior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

We will begin the course by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus, Goethe's Faust. Eine Tragoedie (both Parts; tr. Arndt), Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuehn as Told by a Friend (tr. Lowe-Porter), and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny), and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues they raise. Each session will begin with a brief presentation on the day's topic, but be devoted chiefly to discussion. This course may be used to fulfill the Junior-Senior ECB writing requirement. (Amrine)

449. Special Topics in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

THE WESTERN MIND IN REVOLUTION: SIX REINTERPRETATIONS OF THE HUMAN CONDITION IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION. This course will treat six major reinterpretations of the human condition from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries generated by intellectual revolutions in astronomy (Copernicus: the heliocentric theory), theology (Luther: the Reformation), biology (Darwin: evolution of the species), sociology (Marx: Communism), psychology (Freud: psychoanalysis), and physics (Einstein: the theory of relativity). All six reinterpretations initiated a profound revaluation of Western man's concept of himself as well as a reassessment of the nature and function of his political and social institutions. Since each of these revolutions arose in direct opposition to some of the most central and firmly accepted doctrines of their respective ages, we will study: (1) how each thinker perceived the particular "truth" he sought to communicate; (2) the problems entailed in expressing and communicating these truths; and (3) the traumatic nature of the psychological upheaval caused by these cataclysmic transitions from the past to the future both on the personal and cultural level. Texts: Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Bodies (1543); Luther, Appeal to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation (1520), Of the Liberty of a Christian Man (1520); Darwin, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859); Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts (1844), Das Kapital (1867, 1885, 1894); Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905); and Einstein, Relativity, the Special and the General Theory: A Popular Exposition (1921). Three one-hour exams. (Peters)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (FL).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, extracts from Swedish literature (prose and poetry), etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Goransson)

106. Elementary Danish. Danish 105. (4). (FL).

Second-term Danish is intended for students with some previous knowledge of the language. The emphasis will be placed on developing communicative language skills, but there will also be a review and an extension of the basic grammar introduced in Danish 105. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The course will be taught on the basis of a Coursepack including newspaper articles, short stories, and poems. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and examination. The teacher is a native speaker from Denmark. (Mose)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Goransson)

236. Second-Year Danish. Danish 235. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Danish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Danish up to a level of Danish 235. The course will continue developing written and oral communicative abilities, and also continue grammar review as introduced in Danish 235. Readings are selected from Danish literature (prose and poetry) and Danish civics (history, sociology, philosophy, etc.). All instruction will be in Danish, and grades will be determined on a basis of class participation, written essays, tests at regular intervals, and examination. Students who need Danish 235 or the equivalent for entry into 236 can meet the prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Gitte Mose)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

421. Modern Scandinavian Literature in English. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

A survey course covering late 19th century through today. Primarily intended for undergraduates, this course presents an overview of Scandinavian literature beginning with the "breakthrough" of modernism announced by Georg Brandes and ending with recent works by the present generation of writers. Representative works to be read are: the novels of Hans Branner, Knut Hamsun's Pan, several modern plays, and a selection of recent poetry by leading contemporary feminist writers. Guest lectures by a variety of staff members. Requirements: no previous knowledge of Scandinavian is required, as all readings are in translation; a midterm examination, a final examination, and a term paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. The main thrust of the course will be to focus on major developmental trends and genres. (Markey)

460/Soc. 429. Issues in Modern Scandinavia. Introductory sociology or introductory political science or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Section 001 THE WELFARE STATE AND SOCIETY IN SCANDINAVIA. The issue discussed in this course is "The Welfare State and Society in Scandinavia." The course will present a sociological perspective on the Scandinavian Welfare Statein dealing with the following major topics: the political economy of the emergence of the welfare state, how the welfare state has modified class and gender inequalities, workplace democracy, and alienation in urban life. Exams and term paper. Lecture. (Bjorn)


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