University Courses (Division 495)

150. Freshman Seminar. Freshmen; sophomores with permission of instructor. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Section 001 TRAGEDY AND THE HUMAN CONDITION. The readings in the seminar will consist of primary materials, but there will be a few presentations of critical theories and interpretations at the beginning of the term. For our purposes the many theories of tragedy can be reduced to this simple characterization: tragedy is a serious drama, a serious presentation by speech and action of some phase of human life. The seminar will consider tragedies from Aeschylus to Arthur Miller and will study them in order to demonstrate how the formulation above has been adapted, modified or challenged by dramatists. The seminar is not a lecture course and the participants are expected to do most of the talking. There will be four written assignments, a midterm and a final examination, both based on take-home study questions. Aeschylus, ORESTEIA; Sophocles, OEDIPUS THE KING; Euripides; ELECTRA; THE PHOENICIAN WOMAN, THE BACCHAE; Aristophanes, THE FROGS; Shakespeare, MACBETH, OTHELLO, KING LEAR; Ibsen, GHOSTS, DOLL'S HOUSE; O'Casey, JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK, and Miller, DEATH OF A SALESMAN. (Graf)

Section 002 THE YOUNG AND THE OLD: AN EXPLORATION THROUGH LITERATURE. Intensive reading and discussion of a number of literary works drama, fiction, biography in which the theme of the relations of youth and age is central. Works read and discussed will be drawn from the ancient and the modern world. Students will be asked for several sorts of papers: analysis of a problem as presented by one of the authors; evaluation of its literary treatment; autobiographical, fictional, or poetic treatment of some generational conflict drawn from their own experience; a critical review of a work other than assigned reading, as of film, television or stage production. Oral presentation will be encouraged as a supplement to written work. READING LIST: Sophocles, OEDIPUS REX, ANTIGONE, and ELECTRA; Shakespeare,, KING LEAR, ROMEO AND JULIET; Edmund Gosse, FATHER AND SON; Henry James, WASHINGTON SQUARE; Samuel Butler, THE WAY OF ALL FLESH; Saul Bellow, MR. SAMMLER'S PLANET; Ivan Turgenev, FATHERS AND SONS and D. H. Lawrence, SONS AND LOVERS. (Firebaugh)

Section 003 UNDERSTANDING AND ENJOYING POETRY. While poetry is speech, a mode of communication among men and women, it is speech of a special kind, in which words are used, combined, in such a way as to produce not simply a straightforward utilitarian statement like a telegram or a set of directions, but a complex work of art that communicates in many-sided subtle ways. Now, it may well be that a taste for poetry is a gift, quite as much as the ability to make poetry, it should be possible to deepen our appreciation of it by careful study of the exact ways in which poems make their appeal to us. The aim of the course will be to explore, by reading and discussing a variety of individual poems from both past and present, the ways in which poems work to produce the specific kinds of satisfaction they can offer us, and to help the individual reader develop a sense of the unique value of poetry, for one of the major arts. Reading assignments: close, analytic reading of a few poems for each class meeting, plus longer assignments of poems that will not be necessarily the basis of class discussion. Short papers on single poems throughout the term, and a more extensive paper, towards the end, on the work of a particular poet chosen by each student individually. Text: THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF POETRY, Third Edition (Complete Edition, not the Shorter Edition). (Students who have access to the Second Edition should be able to use it without inconvenience). (Barrows)

151. Freshman Seminar. Freshmen; sophomores with permission of instructor. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit.

Section 001 BLACKS AND JEWS: DIALOGUE ON ETHNIC IDENTITY. This course will explore a wide variety of questions on ethnic identity, focusing primarily on the experience of Blacks and Jews. Initially, the class will explore the unique concerns and perspectives of minority groups and individuals. Discussion will move to a review of dominant historical issues for Blacks and Jews including socio-economic, political and educational concerns. Special emphasis will be placed on Black-Jewish relations. Other topics such as integration and assimilation, inter-group and inter-personal relationships, will also be examined. Dialogue among students in the class will be an essential component of the course and it is expected that students selecting the class will be prepared to openly, critically, and sensitively participate to further an understanding of the issues. Extensive writing and reading will be required. There will be some guest speakers, and films as part of the instructional format. Students interested in this course must see David Schoem for an override. (Schoem)

Section 004 THE CIVILIZATION OF "LA BELLE ÉPOQUE." In the quarter-century between 1890 and 1917 dominant European social classes crafted a civilization of distinction. Known as La Belle Époque to those who looked back with nostalgia from the barren vantage point of post-World War I Europe, this period was in fact one of the glaring contrasts between plenty and penury, militarism and pacifism, representative government and autocracy, scientific advance and anarchist assassination. It was a period of smug security laced with desperate anxiety and, as such, it both deserves and repays study by those who seek to understand themselves, their past and their prospects for the future. The reading load will be heavy a book per week (some novels) and grades will be based upon several papers as well as class participation. Some background in European history will be very useful. This will not, of course, be a chronological survey, we will use the techniques of social history to look at various classes and functional groups (like labor and business) as well as institutions such as education, bureaucracy and the military. We will pay particular attention to the attitudes and assumptions which held this society together and the First World War, which destroyed it and them. (Peiter)

Section 007 CUSTER'S LAST STAND: FROM MYTH TO HISTORY. On June 25, 1876, at approximately 2 p.m. General George Armstrong Custer, with part of his Seventh Cavalry Regiment, unwittingly engaged a vastly superior force of Sioux Indians and their allies on the Little Big Horn River, near what is today Gary Owen, Montana. Within an hour all of Custer's troops were annihilated; other elements of the regiment, dug in several miles away, survived, although with heavy losses. Almost immediately this battle aroused heated controversy, the supporters of Custer practically deifying him, his detractors blackening his name. The historical event passes into the realm of myth, and for over 100 years "history" has been trying to catch up. What happened? What were the causes? The consequences? What was Custer's role in the debacle? The assumption of this seminar is that a Presidential Commission has assigned us to the task of sorting through the large amounts of available evidence and bringing back conclusions. We accept the challenge and organize ourselves as "History, Incorporated," an investigative team, in which each of us, with the instructor as senior partner, carves out an area for individual research. We shall begin with the events the Battle and walk logically and slowly outward from the battlefield backwards in time, and forward as well, so that by the end of term, we shall have investigated everything from the memoirs and the official records of both the cavalry and the Indian's sides to the biographies of the major participants, their expectations and motivations, as well as issues of national policy regarding the Indians, and the role of the media of the time in reporting the events. The aim is to introduce seminar participants to working as historians work. A field trip to Monroe, Michigan, sometime home of Custer and the location of a fine collection of Custeriana, is also planned. (Orlin)

202. Poetry for the Eye: Drawing and Painting. (3). (Excl).

POETRY FOR THE EYE: PAINTING AND CREATIVITY. This course bridges the gap between the technical emphasis of the Art School and the analytical dissection of Art History. The general purpose is to make visual poetry to delight the eyes and the senses; it encourages and develops creativity in art and increases pleasure in the Museum of Art. Even totally inexperienced people have more talent than they would imagine. The course greatly increases that talent as the student personally experiences the problems and solves them and becomes familiar with the Museum's collections. The true basis of the course is "We learn by doing," St. Augustine. Instead of just looking, the student is taught to see like the artist who searches for deeper vision: The design beneath the surface of Life. The non-traditional U.C. 202 chooses to draw and paint the world through the eyes of Van Gogh, Matisse and Picasso. Time does not permit a deliberate emphasis upon technical skill, as in an art class. Instruction is a series of problems in (1) Design and Painting, (2) Color as theory and practice, (3) Art History with the art museum as a source of knowledge and inspiration, (4) A Visual Dictionary of personally symbolic emotions, (5) The Psychology of the Artist. A final problem, over the last four weeks, constitutes an exam, calling for understanding of all the earlier material. Grades are given on the basis of a portfolio of DAILY classwork plus the final exam problem. In the classroom four pieces of work are performed everyday so that the portfolio contains 104 pieces of work. The student has studied about art, but also created art in abundance. The supplies are chosen so as to be easily mastered by the inexperienced: lead pencils, magic markers, colored papers. The text is a course pack of Klee, Matisse, and Picasso. My course is a practical experience for those whose specialty lies elsewhere, but who feel the need of art to complete their educations and their lives. Course 202 demands perfect attendance and concentrated effort during the whole class session; not keeping up in either way will result in failing the course. Perfect attendance and concentrated effort are inflexible conditions for enrolling in the course. Any student whose purpose in education is the amassing of grade points, instead of a life fulfilling experience, is advised not to take this course. (Prendergast) bridges the gap between the technical emphasis of the Art School and the analytical dissection of Art History. The general purpose is to make visual poetry to delight the eyes and the senses; it encourages and develops creativity in art and increases pleasure in the Museum of Art. Even totally inexperienced people have more talent than they would imagine. The course greatly increases that talent as the student personally experiences the problems and solves them and becomes familiar with the Museum's collections. The true basis of the course is "We learn by doing," St. Augustine. Instead of just looking, the student is taught to see like the artist who searches for deeper vision: The design beneath the surface of Life. The non-traditional U.C. 202 chooses to draw and paint the world through the eyes of Van Gogh, Matisse and Picasso. Time does not permit a deliberate emphasis upon technical skill, as in an art class. Instruction is a series of problems in (1) Design and Painting, (2) Color as theory and practice, (3) Art History with the art museum as a source of knowledge and inspiration, (4) A Visual Dictionary of personally symbolic emotions, (5) The Psychology of the Artist. A final problem, over the last four weeks, constitutes an exam, calling for understanding of all the earlier material. Grades are given on the basis of a portfolio of DAILY classwork plus the final exam problem. In the classroom four pieces of work are performed everyday so that the portfolio contains 104 pieces of work. The student has studied about art, but also created art in abundance. The supplies are chosen so as to be easily mastered by the inexperienced: lead pencils, magic markers, colored papers. The text is a course pack of Klee, Matisse, and Picasso. My course is a practical experience for those whose specialty lies elsewhere, but who feel the need of art to complete their educations and their lives. Course 202 demands perfect attendance and concentrated effort during the whole class session; not keeping up in either way will result in failing the course. Perfect attendance and concentrated effort are inflexible conditions for enrolling in the course. Any student whose purpose in education is the amassing of grade points, instead of a life fulfilling experience, is advised not to take this course. (Prendergast)

210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care. (4). (Excl).

This seminar is for students considering a career in a health-related profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives that will facilitate their decision making process. Health care professionals visit the seminar and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing and public health students. They examine issues pertaining to health care delivery, issues of death and dying, and ethical questions related to the health professions. Students are expected to respond in writing to the visitors, to the reading materials, and to films. Three course packs serve as the required text. Students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests and through a term paper in which they investigate a possible career direction. A substantial part of the inventory will be done on computers. Knowledge of word processing is not essential; however, typing skills will be helpful. Evaluation is based on attendance and participation and on completion of all assignments. Enrollment by override only. Call 662-0683 (home phone): state the time of your call, your name, address, telephone number, class level (Fr,So,Ju,Sr), your career interest, and a time when you can be reached. (F.Zorn)

265. Values and Science. (4). (HU).

An introduction to ways of thinking critically about modern problems that involve both science and values. Lectures will provide background in the nature of science, values, decision making, and other key ingredients needed to reach responsible conclusions. Discussions will allow students to explore one special topic of particular interest in more detail. During the term students will work in small groups, called "commissions," charged with bringing in a final joint report on a particular problem. Possible topics include: the arms race, chemical dumps, the energy crisis, nuclear wastes, genetic engineering, environmental causes of disease, or other problems that bring into focus science-values conflicts. The final report and a lecture log book are the main requirements of the course. (Steneck)

325. Introduction to Cognitive Science. Sophomore or junior standing. (3). (N.Excl).

INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE SCIENCE. This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of intelligent activity, or cognition. It draws upon the methods and concepts of cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy of mind and language, cognitive anthropology, and neuroscience. The primary goal of the course is to introduce the student to both the need and the manner of an interdisciplinary approach to cognition. This will be done by introducing general concepts and approaches, and then examining their use through an in-depth examination of selected specific topics. The specific topics will come from perception, learning, knowledge representation, problem-solving, thinking, reasoning, and the language behavior. The material will be presented through a mixture of lecture, class discussion, and readings from a specially prepared course pack. In addition to exams, there will be at least one project that requires the student to explore a specific topic using the concepts and methods from at least two fields. Two faculty members from different disciplines will jointly teach the course. (G. Olson)

411. Pediatric Psychology: Health and Illness in Children and Families. Upperclass standing; introductory courses in biological and/or social sciences. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

PEDIATRIC PSYCHOLOGY; HEALTH AND ILLNESS IN CHILDREN AND FAMILIES. During the past decade, a multidisciplinary approach to the study and treatment of health and illness in children and their families has emerged. Relevant disciplines in the medical field, including pediatrics, nursing and public health, have cooperated with disciplines in the behavioral sciences, primarily developmental and clinical psychology and sociology, in formulating the assumptions and hypotheses. Both a new perspective and a new field have emerged, although the boundaries are still being established. Those working in this area refer to it variously as health behavior or pediatric psychology. One of the major tenets is the generic, or noncategorical, approach to illness or dysfunction. A particular disease or handicapping condition is only one factor to be considered in determining the impact and consequences on the child and family. There are important dimensions that cut across the traditional categories that must be considered as well, such as long-term prognosis, limitations on motility and mobility, physical appearance e.g., can the child pass as normal in social situations, family's access to needed medical, educational and community resources. A most important dimension is the child's developmental age and status. There are many more problems in common to be considered between two adolescents with different handicaps than there are comparing an infant and an adolescent with the same condition. There has emerged provocative and informative literature during the past decade in this field, and writings of many of the leading researchers and practictioners will be read and discussed in the class. (Hagen)

460. Issues in the History of Chemical and Biological Warfare. Senior standing; and Poli. Sci. 160 or Univ. Course 330 or RC Interdivisional 450. (4). (Excl).

This seminar examines the history of chemical and biological warfare and of efforts towards chemical and biological disarmament. The introductory sessions will develop a theoretical framework based on examination of the policies and strategic doctrines that have guided development of chemical and biological weapons and of some principal critiques of those doctrines. Later sessions will examine specific episodes in the history of chemical and biological warfare and disarmament, particularly with a view to understanding the kinds of precedents that have been set for both use and non-use. The main emphasis of the seminar will be on developments since 1970. The seminar will treat in depth the development of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention, the history of negotiations for a Chemical Weapons Convention, the impact of the emergence of new biotechnology on military policy, and the present pressures of the chemical and biological warfare legal regime. (S. Wright)


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