Germanic Languages and Literatures

Dutch Courses (Division 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text LEVAND NEDERLANDS (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To strengthen the command of the language, grammatical patterns in conversation will be emphasized. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with songs of Dutch singers and cabaret artists, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. (Broos)

339. Independent Study. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Dutch Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Courses in the past covered different areas like Dutch-Indonesian literature, the language of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, Dutch between English and German, etc. Courses must be supervised by a faculty member and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. (Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (HU).

This course is conducted in English by the annual visiting writer-in-residence, usually a well known novelist or poet chosen by the Dutch Ministry of Culture to represent The Netherlands. This year's writer will be the distinguished Thomas Rosenboom, known for his award winning novels and translations. The difference from ordinary literature and creative or news writing courses is that you will meet an esteemed writer and have the opportunity to exchange views on culture, literature, the practice of writing, communication, etc. both American and Dutch. Students are encouraged to bring in their own writing for reviewing and critical assessment. The course has not the ordinary professorial approach and is open to all lovers of texts, literary or otherwise, both American and European. Regular class attendance and participation in class discussions followed by at least one substantial paper will be required. (Rosenboom)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine the poetry and prose of both The Netherlands and Belgium in modern times. The reading of poems, short stories, novellas, etc. in the original language will provide the student with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and points of view of Modern Dutch Literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his work. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. (Broos)

Courses in German (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop basic proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are provided with opportunities to practice using German in a range of situations frequently encountered in German- speaking cultures. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students and with selections from the DEUTSCH DIREKT! video series. It is highly recommended that students use taped exercises available in the Language Laboratory. There are two quizzes, four chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write one short composition and present a brief dialogue in German.

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. See German 101 for a general description. Course requirements include two quizzes, four chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write two short compositions, present a brief dialogue in German, and read selections that explore some cultural differences between life in German-speaking countries and the United States.

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

Course for students who have had two to three years of high school German or one or more terms of college German NOT at The University of Michigan - but who are not yet at second-year proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students use German in a range of situations frequently encountered in German-speaking cultures. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students and with selections from the DEUTSCH DIREKT! video series. It is highly recommended that students use taped exercises available in the Language Laboratory. There are seven tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write two short compositions, present a brief dialogue in German, and read selections that explore some cultural differences between life in German-speaking countries and the United States. These sections meet FIVE times per week. Students can enroll in 231 upon completion of this course.

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of scientific texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. (Hofacker)

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts from commonly read West German periodicals. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students and with selections from the DEUTSCH DIREKT! video series. There are five hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students give a three-minute oral presentation in German on a topic of personal interest and write and rewrite three essays related to class readings. The language of instruction is German.

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 236. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. See German 231 for a general description. Students will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss short German prose as well as a longer work WITH the benefit of English equivalents for complicated passages. There are two quizzes, three hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination. Students will give a five-minute oral presentation in German on a topic of personal interest and write and rewrite three essays related to class readings; the fourth and last essay is written in class. The language of instruction is German.

236. Scientific German. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 232. (4). (FL).

The purpose of this course is to provide basic practice in the reading and translation of texts primarily from the natural sciences. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation. Students will also select and translate an outside article in their field. Quizzes are given in addition to a final exam. Texts supplied by instructor. (Paslick)

305. Practical German. German 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected for credit twice.

Course designed for students who want to improve their confidence and proficiency in conversational skills. Emphasis will be placed on using German in specific real-life situations and learning the appropriate phonological, morphological, and syntactical structures needed in those situations. Outside readings serve as the basis for class discussion. The class will frequently be divided into small groups to pursue areas of special interest. The credit/no credit grades are based on attendance, homework, and in-class participation. Students must attend at least 80% of the sessions to receive credit for the course. Classes meet twice a week for one hour.

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations.

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

Except by special permission of the instructor, only students who have completed German 325 should elect 326. See 325 for the description.

351. Business German. German 232. (3). (Excl).

The course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and practices of procedures used in German business, industry, trade, banking and insurance and the journals, newspapers and reports covering their activities. The subjects covered range from advertising to financial transactions and reports. The course is a continuation of German 350 which is not a prerequisite to 351 The text will consist of readings from actual German business reports and transactions taken from journals, newspapers and professional journals and advertising. The emphasis in the course will be on banking, commerce and international trade. There will be a selected list of outside reading in English such as William Manchester's THE ARMS OF KRUPP and others. (Fabian)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts read in recent terms were by Hauptmann, Brecht, Kaiser, Zuckmayer, Durrenmatt and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. One short interpretive paper will be assigned for the term; they may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. (Cowen)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. (Grilk)

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 425 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

In this course various approaches will be used to improve the student's proficiency. Since only German is used in this class, it cannot be taken in fulfillment of the ECB requirement. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on the history and culture of the German-speaking countries and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Video cassettes will also be integrated into the course. Each student is expected to give a brief presentation and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on compositions as well as class participation. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425. (Weiss)

451. 16th and 17th Century Literature. Senior standing; or permission of instructor. (2). (HU).

An introduction to the lively world of the Renaissance, to its manners and mores, its intellectual life, and the exciting new discoveries that mark the beginnings of modern times. On the basis of major literary works like the SHIP OF FOOLS, we gain first-hand insights into social and cultural activities, art, architecture, music, and the sciences. Readings from Martin Luther introduce us to the religious and philosophical turmoils of the period. Other readings include the Master Singers of Nuremberg, Baroque poetry, as well as an early comedy. A visit to the Rare Books Collection will help us trace the progress from manuscript to the invention of printing and the early development of the new media. Slides and tapes will augment lectures on art, architecture, and music. This is a genuinely cross-cultural and interdisciplinary course that even transcends German national borders by including the rest of Europe. (Dunnhaupt)

455. Nineteenth-Century German Fiction. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The objective of this course is to introduce the students to significant works of German fiction of the nineteenth century. Particular attention will be given to the NOVELLE whose development during this period constitutes one of the major achievements of German literature. Works representing Romanticism (Tieck, Hoffmann), the BIEDERMEIERZEIT (Buchner, Gotthelf, Stifter), and Realism (Keller, Meyer, Storm, Fontane) will be explored. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. (Weiss)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a literary topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. If the work is judged to be of Honors caliber, an Honors citation is also awarded. (Crichton)

506. Seminar in the Structure of Modern German. German 415 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF EARLY NEW HIGH GERMAN. There are two major objectives in this course: first to become familiar with the language-internal structure of German as it was written between 1300 and 1750, so that the student is comfortable with a wide range of styles including diaries, Luther and the language of the KANZLEI. We will then examine systematic correlations between language- external factors (gender and education of the writer; style and register of the document) and variation leading to change. Accordingly, we will discuss the viability of examining phonological change in the written language, although in the practical stage we will be concerned with syntactic change. To this end each student will be given one ENHG text and will become familiar with socio- historical linguistic theory and basic quantitative methodology by actually analyzing a case of syntactic change in the individual texts. By comparing findings for texts from different time periods, written by persons with different sociocultural backgrounds, we should be able to make some generalizations about the propagation of syntactic change. There will be readings in ENHG language and culture and in linguistic theory; in-class translations; oral reports; and an oral and written presentation on the individual's findings. Although designed for graduate students specializing in linguistics in the department, students with a basic background in linguistics and a good grasp of the language, as well as advanced undergraduates, are welcome. Texts: Phillip EINFUHRUNG IN DAS FRUHNEUHOCHDEUTSCHE; Ebert DEUTSCHE SYNTAX 1300-1750; course pack. (Lippi)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

320. German Expressionism in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; sophomores by permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the intellectual, social, and literary and political events in Germany from 1900 to 1930. The subjects covered will include the various forms of art and how they relate to each other and to the cultural and political climate of Germany during that time. Special emphasis will be given to those aspects of the period which eventually proved to be of significant influence on American culture. The format of the course includes lectures and discussion. Included in the course will be the viewing of films of the most important film directors of the time such as Lubitsch, Land, Murnau, Wiene, Pabts, Lamprecht, and Ruttmann, and films indicative of the period but not generally available such as: SIEGFRIED, NOSFERATU, ROSKOLNIKOW, THE CURSED, PANDORA'S BOX, PITZ PALU, and SPIES, among others. A term paper or a final examination will be required. (Fabian)

331. Contemporary German Film. (3). (HU).

This is an introduction to the postwar German films that have become collectively known and acclaimed as the "New German Cinema." After a series of lectures on the historical background of German film (prewar and Nazi film, and the postwar domination by American film), the social and economic context of a revived film industry, and the rudiments of film analysis, the course will proceed by way of approximately ten film screenings and subsequent lectures and discussions. Each film will be screened once in class and followed the next day by an attendance-encouraged second screening; in advance of each screening students will receive study guides containing information about the film and its director and questions to bear in mind while viewing the film. There will also be occasional readings on reserve. The films will be chosen from those by Alexander Kluge, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Wim Wenders, Helma Sanders-Brahms, Peter Handke, Rudolf Thome and others. The "themes" or problems raised in the films include: retelling the war and postwar experiences, versions of America as seen by Germans, recent political terrorism and Germany's responses to it, German versions of American film genres (e.g., the western), women's perspectives on contemporary life. There will be a "lab fee" to cover the cost of film rentals. Students will write four 5-6 page papers. (Bahti)

375/MARC 375/Rel. 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology. (3). (HU).

See Religion 375. (Beck)

442. Faust and the Faust Legend in English Translation. Junior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

We will begin the course by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus will be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's TRAGICALL HISTORY OF THE LIFE AND DEATH OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, Goethe's FAUST, EINE TRAGOEDIE (both Parts; tr. Arndt), Thomas Mann's DOCTOR FAUSTUS: THE LIFE OF THE GERMAN COMPOSER ADRIAN LEVERKUEHN AS TOLD BY A FRIEND (tr. Lowe-Porter), and Mikhail Bulgakov's THE MASTER AND MARGARITA (tr. Glenny), and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues they raise. Each session will begin with a brief presentation on the day's topic, but be devoted chiefly to discussion. This course may be used to fulfill the Junior-Senior ECB writing requirement. (Amrine)

444/MARC 443. Medieval German Literature in English Translation. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

Special emphasis will be placed on the great masterpieces of around 1200: the Nibelungen epic, the Arthurian romances, the Tristan legend, the Parzival-Grail story, and the troubadour lyrics. Within limits, attention will be given to pertinent cases in other European literatures (English, French, Latin, Scandinavian). The reading list also covers the earlier periods and contains a number of European "firsts": the first medieval woman writer, the first chivalric novel, the first animal epic. The works will be analyzed as documents of medieval man's world-view; and considerations of form and type will lead to discussions pertaining to the emergence and transformation of literary genres. Selections from the lyrical output (with musical illustrations) include poems of the CARMINA BURANA and of Tannhauser, the 13th century poet of Wagnerian fame. Readings of the novella are chosen from the large body of its courtly, hagiographic, and fabliau-type variants, stemming mainly from the 13th century and with prototypes of an earlier age. Student evaluation will be based on class participation, two short papers, and a final exam. (Scholler)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (FL).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, extracts from Swedish literature (prose and poetry), etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Roth)

106. Elementary Danish. Danish 105. (4). (FL).

Second-term Danish is intended for students with some previous knowledge of the language. The emphasis will be placed on developing communicative language skills, but there will also be a review and an extension of the basic grammar introduced in Danish 105. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The course will be taught on the basis of a Coursepack including newspaper articles, short stories, and poems. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and examination. The teacher is a native speaker from Denmark. (Hurop)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Roth)

236. Second-Year Danish. Danish 235. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Danish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Danish up to a level of Danish 235. The course will continue developing written and oral communicative abilities, and also continue grammar review as introduced in Danish 235. Readings are selected from Danish literature and Danish civics (history, sociology, philosophy, etc.). All instruction will be in Danish, and grades will be determined on a basis of class participation, written essays, tests at regular intervals, and examination. Students who need Danish 235 or the equivalent for entry into 236 can meet the prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Hurop)

450. History and Structure of the Scandinavian Languages. Reading knowledge of a Scandinavian language. (3). (HU).

The origin of the Scandinavian languages in Germanic and Proto-Scandinavian. The development of Modern dialects and the standard languages of Scandinavia. Comparative analysis of Scandinavian linguistic structures.

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

413/Hist. of Art 413/Architecture 413. Architecture and Art of Scandinavia. (3). (HU).

See History of Art 413. (Marzolf)


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