Courses in Chemistry (Division 334)

108. 2.5 General Chemistry. Chem. 107. (3). (NS).

Chemistry 108 is the second part of a three course sequence (107, 108, 109); Chemistry 107 is offered during the Fall Term only; Chemistry 108 during the Winter Term only, and Chemistry 109 is offered during both Spring (IIIA) and Fall Terms. The sequence is equivalent to Chemistry 123, 126, 125; Chemistry 108 parallels Chemistry 126. (Refer to the Chemistry 126 description for course content details). The 107, 108, 109 sequence is intended for students who would benefit most from a smaller class, more classroom contact and more feedback than available in the larger General Chemistry lecture classes. There are five meetings a week in Chemistry 108. Student grades are determined from weekly quizzes and homework assignments, three hour examinations(Tuesday nights), and a final examination. (See Time Schedule for examination times and dates.)

123. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Structure of Matter. Three years of high school mathematics or mathematics through 105. (3). (NS).

Chemistry 123 is the first term chemistry course in the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence. Chemistry 125 and 126 are taken second term. Chemistry 123 consists of three lectures and a help session with the professor, and one discussion session with a teaching assistant per week. Topics covered include stoichiometry, periodic properties, gases, solution equilibria, acids and bases, quantum theory, and electronic structure of atoms and molecules. There are three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination as listed in the Time Schedule.

CSP section(s) available. See Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP) section in this Guide.

125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory. To be elected by students who have completed Chem. 123 or are eligible for (or enrolled in) Chem. 124. (2). (NS).

This course is a part of the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence and is intended to be elected with Chemistry 124 (in the 124/126 sequence) or with Chemistry 126 (in the 123/126 sequence). The format consists of one lecture and one four-hour laboratory each week. Computer simulations implemented on microcomputers are used to supplement the experiments. Part of the last hour of the laboratory period is used to discuss the laboratory work just completed. Special emphasis is placed on quantitative measurements, inferences from experimental observations, and development and application of concepts related to chemical reactions. Oxidation-reduction, acid-base and ionic reactions will be examined including energy changes and reaction equilibria. The student will apply laboratory skills and the concepts developed from studies of chemical reactions to analyses and synthesis. There are two one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) as listed in the Time Schedule.

126. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics. Chem. 123 or 124; prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 125. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 123 or 124 and should be preceded or accompanied by Chemistry 125. The course has three lectures and one discussion per week. Topics include covalent bonding, liquids and solids, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibria, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. There are three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination as listed in the Time Schedule.

140. Chemistry. A Search to Understand. Not intended for students with extensive background in chemistry. Not open to students with AP credit in chemistry or the equivalent. (4). (NS).

A person living in a western country today is constantly bombarded with chemical information, most of it associated with warnings of dire consequences. Yet most people do not have the scientific background necessary to evaluate this information correctly and, if need be, respond to it as informed consumers and citizens. A lake has a pH of 5. Is this good or bad? How are the Styrofoam containers used by fast food restaurants connected to the disappearance of the ozone layer? And how is the disappearance of the ozone layer connected to an increase in skin cancer? What are polyunsaturated fats and why are they supposed to be better for you than saturated fats? Can a margarine be rich in polyunsaturated fats? These are all questions with large chemical components. This course is designed for the student who is intellectually curious about such questions but who does not plan to major in one of the physical or biological sciences. No previous background in chemistry is necessary. The course uses lectures, discussions and laboratory work to explore the ways in which chemists develop models to explain the chemical changes that they observe, how they test these models, and how they change them as more and different experimental data become available. The content of the course is broadly based ranging from the theory of atomic structure to compounds of biological interest. While some calculations will be necessary, the primary emphasis will be on a qualitative understanding of phenomena and a reasoning by analogy to make predictions about new phenomena. Students may help to shape the content of the course by suggesting topics of particular interest to themselves for discussion. In the laboratory students will do simple experiments that allow them to experience the curiosity that is aroused by actually causing and observing chemical transformations. They will also learn simple analytical techniques that will allow them to answer questions such as which dyes are present in food colorings or how much Vitamin C is in their orange juice. Most of the work for this course will be done during class and laboratory hours. This class does not require extensive outside reading. The course will have three hourly examinations and a final examination. Students will also be asked to write a short (3-10 pages) paper on some topic of their choice.

197. Honors General and Quantitative Analytical Chemistry. Chem. 196 or 124 and 125 and permission of instructor. (5). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 196 and is part of a two-term sequence for very well prepared science students. A small group of students who have done very well in the Fall Term, Chemistry 124-125 courses can also enroll in the course. Almost all of the students in the Chemistry 196-197 sequence are in the Honors Program. Analytical chemistry is emphasized in Chemistry 197. Topics include statistics, chemical equilibrium (weak acid-base, complexation, solubility), potentiometry, phase equilibrium and chromatography, optical methods of analysis, and radioactive and kinetic methods of analysis. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. In lieu of exams, biweekly quizzes are given, seven total of which the one lowest for each student is omitted in the final total. No final exam. SCHAUM'S OUTLINE of ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (by A. A. Gordus), QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS (by D. C. Harris) and laboratory manual are required and the later is available through the Chemistry Building Chem. Stores.

225. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 197 or 348. (4). (NS).

This course is the first of a two term lecture sequence in the basic principles of organic chemistry. It is elected by preprofessional students and by chemistry concentrators. Inteflex students elect Chemistry 220/221/222, which has the same lecture but selected recitations. Chemistry 225/226 requires skill in spatial relations, the ability to organize information carefully and the ability to recognize important concepts. Chemistry 225, which establishes the conceptual framework upon which Chemistry 226 is based, describes the relationship between structure, energy and chemical reactivity. There are three lectures each week and one-hour discussion. The course grade is determined by a student's scores on three one-hour examinations, quiz grades, and a final examination.

226. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 225; and concurrent enrollment in Chem. 227. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 225 and emphasizes functional group chemistry and synthesis. Some attention is given to biological systems and to the chemistry of natural products, especially the chemistry of carbohydrates and proteins. The course format is three lectures each week, and the final grade is based on three one-hour examinations and a final examination.

227. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 225. (2). (NS).

This course is a one term introduction to organic laboratory techniques and enables students to experience organic chemistry as a real science. Chemistry 227 is usually elected concurrently with Chemistry 226 and reinforces concepts developed in Chemistry 225/226 lectures. Wet chemical methods are emphasized, but there is some opportunity to identify organic materials or components of mixtures with the help of spectroscopic information. The course grade is based upon laboratory work and written examinations.

228. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 226 and 227. (2). (Excl).

This course is a one term organic laboratory course which introduces and extends certain synthetic and manipulative techniques not taught in Chemistry 227. It is a more advanced laboratory using techniques to be extrapolated toward introductory research organic methods. Course topics include gas chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, reactions run in inert atmospheres and distillation under reduced pressures. The course also includes instruction and practice in the use of the chemical literature. The final grade is based on laboratory performance and laboratory exams.

300. Principles of Chemical Instrumentation. Physics 240 and 241. (3). (Excl).

This laboratory course introduces the components of modern chemical instrumentation. The major emphasis is on signal conditioning electronics and digital processing (wired logic microcomputer methods). The first 40% of the course consists of characterizations of discrete elements (resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transformers, and transistors) in student-constructed circuits. The next 30% treats more complex circuits (power supplies, operational amplifiers, and TTL integrated circuits). The last part treats other complex circuits (analog-to-digital conversion, wave shaping, digital interfacing and communication, and microcomputer operations) and may include special projects chosen by individual students. The circuits include several types of transducers but a systematic treatment of these elements is not attempted. Although lectures are given during the first eight weeks of the term (during the first lab meeting each week), the emphasis is on work in the laboratory. Evaluation is based on laboratory work (70%), written and oral reports on the last unit (15%), and work directly related to lecture (15%, primarily assigned problems).

319. Independent Study. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits.

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Departmental faculty member. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credit hours awarded and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted, one for the Advising Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 319, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

348. Quantitative Analytical Chemistry. Chem. 125 and 126; or the equivalent. (4). (Excl).

Chemistry 348 in the Winter Term is similar to 197 and is elected for 4 credit hours by students with advanced standing or credit for Chemistry 123 (124), 125, 126, or its equivalent. Analytical chemistry is emphasized in Chemistry 348. Topics include statistics, chemical equilibrium (weak acid/base), complexation, solubility, potentiometry, phase equilibrium and chromatography, optical methods of analysis, and radioactive and kinetic methods of analysis. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. In lieu of exams, quizzes are given (seven total of which the lowest for each student is omitted from the final total). No final exam. SCHAUM'S OUTLINE OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY by A.A. Gordus and a laboratory manual are required; the latter is available through the Chemistry Stores dispensing window in the Chemistry Building.

365. Principles of Physical Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 196; Physics 140 and 141 or 190; and prior or concurrent enrollment in Math. 215 or 285. (4). (Excl).

The main topics of physical chemistry are presented in a manner slightly less rigorous than that employed in the Chemistry 468-469 sequence. Chemistry 365 is recommended for students interested in a one-term physical chemistry course. The topics are the theory of gases, the first and second laws of thermodynamics with application to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions, and kinetics of chemical reactions.

391. Honors Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 197, 300, or 348, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 397. (2). (Excl).

The course has two principal objectives. The first is to acquaint the student with the laboratory aspect of physical chemistry in order to give a different perspective to the theoretical concepts discussed in the basic lecture course. The second is to improve the sophistication of the student with respect to the nature of physical measurements, the errors associated with the measurements, and how these errors may be treated in a systematic fashion.

392. Honors Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 391. (2). (Excl).

Chemistry 392 is a continuation of Chemistry 391 with more advanced experiments. These experiments are often less structured than those in Chemistry 391 and thus offer a greater opportunity for individual initiative.

397. Honors Physical Chemistry. Chem. 396 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

The second of a two-term lecture sequence in physical chemistry primarily for students in Honors Chemistry degree programs. GENERAL SCOPE: the study of matter from a microscopic viewpoint. SPECIFIC TOPICS: kinetic theory of gases; chemical kinetics; quantum chemistry; molecular structure and spectroscopy; crystallography.

399. Honors Introduction to Research. Permission of a chemistry concentration adviser and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits during junior or senior year.

Usually elected in the senior year, this course is a requirement for Honors Chemistry students who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. Non-Honors students are also encouraged to elect the course for a total of up to four credits in any one term. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted; one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Advising Office and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for Chemistry 399 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in 319, and for the Honors student, will be the Honors thesis.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 399, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

403. Inorganic Chemistry. Chem. 197 or 348, or 346 and 347, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 469. (3). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the development and use of various theories, concepts, and models useful in explaining reactivity and structures of inorganic systems. Descriptive chemistry will also be discussed systematically within such a framework. Students will be responsible for assigned material from the text as well as additional selections from reserved material in the Chemistry Library. Text: To be announced.

413. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 403. (2). (Excl).

Chemistry 413 introduces the student to a variety of inorganic syntheses and synthetic techniques, including high temperature solid state reactions, vacuum line techniques, electrochemical syntheses, air exclusion techniques, photochemical preparations, magnetic susceptibility, and mass spectral measurements. Compounds prepared include organo-transition metal derivatives, classical coordination compounds, magnetic solids, Lewis acid-base adducts, and main group compounds. Toward the end of the term, short research projects may be undertaken. Text: R. J. Angelici, SYNTHESIS AND TECHNIQUE IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.

419. Chemical Literature and Scientific Writing. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 468 or 396; or 469 or 397. (2). (Excl).

The course will be devoted to scientific information of importance to chemists: its generation, storage, and retrieval. The student will learn about the sources of chemical information in the form of primary and secondary printed material, abstracts and indexes, and computer banks, and will learn what is available and how to find required data. Some history of science and its impact on society will be interwoven. Scientific writing will be an important part of the course, especially in connection with the generation of scientific information, and about six written papers and two written examinations will be required. Instruction will involve lectures and library practice. This course is intended for those who are concentrating in chemistry or allied subjects.

427. Separation, Characterization and Identification of Organic Compounds. Chem. 228. (3). (Excl).

This course reviews the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds that lend themselves to the separation of mixtures and the characterization and identification of the components of mixtures. The chemistry of the major functional groups, chromatographic methods of separation of mixtures, and the fundamentals of spectroscopic methods as reviewed in the lectures. Emphasis is put on the solution of problems involving these concepts. The laboratory part of the course consists of five structured experiments involving the separation of mixtures and the identification of their components. Extractive and chromatographic techniques are used in separations. The use of techniques suitable for the handling of small quantities of material in the preparation of derivatives and the determination of physical properties is emphasized. Extensive use is made of the chemical literature.

430. Introduction to Bioorganic Mechanisms. Chem. 225 and 226. (3). (Excl).

Applications of organic mechanistic chemistry to the problems of biochemistry, biotechnology and molecular cell biology. Chemistry of fatty acids, carbohydrates, alkaloids and peptides and other natural products will be discussed.

447. Physical Methods of Analysis. Chem. 197 or 348, and 225. (3). (Excl).

The course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatographic separation techniques are stressed. Some discussion of contemporary electrochemistry is included. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced. The course format is lectures three times per week. A textbook is required. Readings from the review literature of analytical chemistry compensate for the inevitable shortcomings of any text.

448. Physical Methods Laboratory. Chem. 300 and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 447. (2). (Excl).

Chemistry 448 provides "hands-on" experience with a variety of modern analytical instruments and the chemistry that supports them. Procedures of importance in such areas as pollution control of clinical analysis are used to illustrate the application and operation of most instruments. Techniques employed may include UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, atomic absorption and atomic emission spectroscopy, flow injection analysis, ion-selective electrode potentiometry, gas and high performance liquid chromatography and polarography. An introduction to computer-aided experimentation is provided. Written reports are required for each procedure carried out. There is one cumulative examination at the end of the term.

468. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (Excl).

This is the first of two-term lecture sequence in Physical Chemistry (followed by Chemistry 469). The course is normally elected by students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Cellular and Molecular Biology and others requiring a rigorous treatment of Physical Chemistry. Topics covered in Chemistry 468: theory of gases; the laws of thermodynamics with applications to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions and electrochemical cells; introduction to statistical mechanics.

469. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (Excl).

This course is the second of the regular two-term sequence in physical chemistry (Chemistry 468 and 469). The topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure, spectroscopy and chemical kinetics.

481. Physicochemical Measurements. Chem. 197 or 348 and 396 or 468. If advanced standing is granted for part of the work, Chemistry 481 may be elected for one credit with permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

The course has two principal objectives. The first is to acquaint the student with the laboratory aspect of physical chemistry in order to give a different perspective to the theoretical concepts discussed in the basic lecture course. The second is to improve the sophistication of the student with respect to the nature of physical measurements, the errors associated with the measurements, and how these errors may be treated in a systematic fashion. PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 468; the course should be preceded or accompanied by Chemistry 469. Text: Shoemaker & Garland, EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY, McGraw-Hill, 3rd Ed.

482. Physicochemical Measurements. Chem. 300 and Chem 481. If advanced standing is granted for part of the work, Chemistry 482 may be elected for one credit with permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

Chemistry 482 is a continuation of Chemistry 481 with more advanced experiments. These often are less structured than those in Chemistry 481 and thus offer a greater opportunity for individual initiative.

536/Chem. Eng. 536. Laboratory in Macromolecular Chemistry. Chem. 535 or Phys. 418; or permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

Experimental techniques for the study of polymer properties in solution will include viscosity, light scattering, NMR, optical rotary dispersion and UV absorption; more complex methods such as dielectric behavior and ultracentrifugation will be illustrated by laboratory demonstration. Elasticity, solvent swelling and gas permeation will be used to characterize bulk polymerization and the fractionization of polymers by chromatophic techniques will supplement those on polymer characterization.

541. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Chem. 540. (3). (Excl).

Synthetic organic chemistry. The scope and limitations of the more important synthetic reactions are discussed within the framework of multi-step organic synthesis.

547. Electronic Instrumentation for Chemistry. Chem. 481 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Theory, practice and application of solid state electronics. Basic transistor theory and linear integrated circuit principles. Uses of negative feedback. Principles and application of logic circuitry. Noise sources and noise reduction. Emphasis throughout on devices and circuits commonly encountered in chemical instruments.

569. X-ray Crystallography. Chem. 469 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Crystal symmetry, diffraction of x-rays by single crystals, principles of structure analysis with selected applications, introduction to computational structure determination methods. Some laboratory work is included to illustrate the use of single crystal techniques in symmetry group identification.

575. Chemical Thermodynamics. Chem. 469. (3). (Excl).

Principles of classical thermodynamics with applications to phase equilibria, solutions and chemical equilibria and electrochemistry. Utilization of molecular and atomic spectra in statistical mechanical calculations. A brief treatment of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is usually included.

580. Molecular Spectra and Structure. Chem. 570 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Review of atomic spectra; rotational, vibration-rotation and electronic spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules; vibronic interactions; deduction of molecular parameters from spectra.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.