Germanic Languages and Literatures

Dutch Courses (Division 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text LEVAND NEDERLANDS (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To strengthen the command of the language, grammatical patterns in conversation will be emphasized. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with songs of Dutch singers and cabaret artists, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. (Broos)

232. Second Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. (Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

"TO BE IS TO BE PERCEIVED" (Bishop Berkely). Plato, in his THEAETETUS, described 'seeing' as a kind of intercourse in which emanations from the eye and the object intermingled to give birth to twins. A metaphor of course. The object becomes white, for instance, while the eye is filled with 'seeing'. Let's leave Plato in his cave. The main theme for my course on Dutch literature and culture will be: PERCEPTION AND THE EGO. Berkeley said it a long time ago: to be is to be perceived. John Berger, art critic and novelist in Great Britian, wrote a book called WAYS OF SEEING (1972). It starts off like this: "Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak. But there is also another sense in which seeing comes before words. It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world; we explain that world with words, but words can never undo the fact that we are surrounded by it. The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled. (...) The way we see things is affected by what we believe." Literature brings about ways of seeing by...ways of telling. Probing new modes of perception is one of the goals of modern (Dutch) literature. Organizing the world or reality in a different, artistic manner. The books we'll discuss (and read fragments of) are, among others: THE ASSAULT, Harry Mulisch; OUT OF MIND, J. Bernlef; RITUALS, Cees Nooteboom; BELGIUM'S SORROW, Hugo Claus. So, no creative writing. We will deal with what comes before that. But writing assignments will be given, connected with the theme of perception and ego. (Boomsma)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues like the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his works. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German," to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions, readings, and videos. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are chapter tests and an oral and written midterm and final. The language of instruction is German.

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. See German 101 for a general description.

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

Course for students who have had two to three years of high school German or one or more terms of college German not at the University of Michigan but who are not yet at second-year proficiency. This course is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German," to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions, readings, and videos. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are chapter tests and an oral and written midterm and final. These sections meet FIVE times per week. Students may enroll in 231 upon satisfactory completion of this course. The language of instruction is German.

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of scientific texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs.

113. Advanced Special Reading. Completion of German 112 with a "B" or the equivalent. (4). (Excl).

This course provides tutorial instruction and supervised reading of German in individual fields of specialization and interest. Accuracy and speed in reading and comprehension are improved through a developed greater skill in the interpretation of grammatical structure and in making logical choices when confronted by structural ambiguities. Required practice increases general and specialized vocabulary. Enhanced linguistic skill brings greater enjoyment and profit in the reading of German. Prerequisite is the completion of German 112 or an equivalent background. Course participants supply reading materials subject to the approval of the instructor. Access to an adequate dictionary is required. There are no examinations. (Hofacker)

230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 221, 222, 231, or 232. (8). (FL).

This course provides highly motivated and linguistically talented students the opportunity to complete the two-term intermediate German sequence in one term. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts from commonly read West German periodicals, prose selections, as well as one longer literary text WITH the benefit of English equivalents for complicated passages. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students and with selections from the DEUTSCH DIREKT! video series. There are three hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination for each term sequence. Students write and rewrite five essays on topics of personal interest; two other essays are written in class. The language of instruction is German.

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts from commonly read West German periodicals. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs of small groups of students and with selections from the DEUTSCH DIREKT! video series. There are quizzes, two midterms, and a final examination. In addition, students give a five-minute oral presentation in German on a topic of personal interest and write four essays, one of which is an in-class essay related to class readings. The language of instruction is German.

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 236. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. See German 231 for a general description. Students will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss short German prose as well as a longer work. There are quizzes, two midterms, and a final examination. Students will give a five-minute oral presentation in German on a topic of personal interest and write four essays related to class readings; the fourth and last essay is written in class. The language of instruction is German.

236. Scientific German. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 232. (4). (FL).

The purpose of this course is to provide basic practice in the reading and translation of texts primarily from the natural sciences. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation. Students will also select and translate an outside article in their field. Quizzes are given in addition to a final exam. Texts supplied by instructor. (Paslick)

305. Practical German. German 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected for credit twice.

Course designed for students who want to improve their confidence and proficiency in conversational skills. Emphasis will be placed on using German in specific real-life situations and learning the appropriate phonological, morphological, and syntactical structures needed in those situations. Outside readings serve as the basis for class discussion. The class will frequently be divided into small groups to pursue areas of special interest. The credit/no credit grades are based on attendance, homework, and in-class participation. Students must attend at least 80% of the sessions to receive credit for the course. Classes meet twice a week for one hour.

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations.

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

German 326 is a continuation of 325, emphasizing grammar review, conversation, and practice in writing. Requirements are similar to those of 325.

351. Business German. German 232. (3). (Excl).

The course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and practices of procedures used in German business, industry, trade, banking and insurance and the journals, newspapers and reports covering their activities. The subjects covered range from advertising to financial transactions and reports. The course is a continuation of German 350 which is not a prerequisite to 351 The text will consist of readings from actual German business reports and transactions taken from journals, newspapers and professional journals and advertising. The emphasis in the course will be on banking, commerce and international trade. There will be a selected list of outside reading in English such as William Manchester's THE ARMS OF KRUPP and others. (Fabian)

382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German dramas of the 19th and 20th centuries. These dramas reflect not only the main literary but also the significant cultural and political trends of the period. In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of individual plays, but the instructor will include some biographical, literary and historical background. The texts read in recent terms were by Hauptmann, Brecht, Kaiser, Zuckmayer, Durrenmatt and Frisch. The major language is German, but not exclusively. One short interpretive paper will be assigned for the term; they may be in English. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. (Cowen)

383. German Lyric Poetry. German 232 or permission of department. (3). (HU).

This course introduces students to German lyric poetry, a genre in which the German-speaking countries have made some of their most significant contributions to world literature. There will be special emphasis on poetry from the age of Goethe through the present but a few examples of earlier poems will also be included. One class hour per week for approximately the first half of the term will be devoted to the study of a theoretical handbook (Wolfgang Kayser, KLEINE DEUTSCHE VERSSCHULE) in order to familiarize students with the technical aspects of poetics. The primary focus of the course will be on contrastive analysis of individual poems from the anthology DEUTSCHE GEDICHTE, ed. Echtermeyer, guided discussion with occasional background lectures. Instructor will speak German, students may use English in discussion if necessary. Papers and examination will be written in English. There will be two short interpretive papers, a midterm, and a final examination. (Seidler)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term.

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 425 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

In this course various approaches will be used to improve the student's proficiency. Since only German is used in this class, it cannot be taken in fulfillment of the ECB requirement. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on the history and culture of the German-speaking countries and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Video cassettes will also be integrated into the course. Each student is expected to give a brief presentation and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on compositions as well as class participation. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425. (Weiss)

452. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Senior standing. (3). (HU).

The course presents a selection of literary masterpieces which have a bearing on our time: plays, a novel (WERTHERS LEIDEN by Goethe) as well as selections of poetry. The assigned readings will be introduced and discussed in class. Majors in German are expected to read the texts in the original, non-majors have the option to consult a translation. The syllabus will be discussed at the first meeting. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Instructor will speak German, students have the option. (Schelle)

454. German Romanticism. 3 years of college German; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the contributions of romanticism to German literary and cultural history. Attention will also be paid to the social and political conditions of the period. Readings will primarily consist of selected fiction and poetry. Students are expected to have completed at least three years of college level German, or the equivalent. They will be encouraged to participate in class discussions for which there should be ample opportunity. (Weiss)

457. Twentieth Century German Fiction. Junior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

Section 001 MANIFESTATIONS OF THE MODERN. We will examine several texts written between approximately 1900 and 1930 whose diversity is emblematic of the fragmentation of modernism. Underlying our investigations will be the sociohistorical developments leading to the explosive release of the various energies that propelled currents such as the early feminist movement, expressionism, futurism, Dadaism, and "neue Sachlichkeit." Some of works to be studied may be considered representative of these movements, others are less easy to categorize. For the most part, readings will be confined to short narratives (or excerpts from longer works) by authors such as Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Hesse, R. Walser, Musil, Benn, Eschmid, Kafka, Th. Mann, Lasker-Schuler, Brecht, Doblin, Fleisser, and Kastner. Conducted as a seminar: occasional lectures will view readings in historical context and in connection with major developments in lyric poetry, drama, cinema, and other arts of the time. Requirements include one in-class presentation, one short paper, and a term paper of 15-20 pages to be written and revised during the second half of the term. (Fries)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a literary topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. If the work is judged to be of Honors caliber, an Honors citation is also awarded. (Crichton)

499. Seminar in German Studies. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 001 GERMAN COMEDIES. A small number of German comedies by Lessing, Kleist, Grillparzer, Hauptmann, and several Twentieth-Century playwrights are well-known to theater audiences and receive their due in the histories of the theater in German-speaking countries. The actual large number of comedies in German and the range of styles and traditions that they represent are generally unrecognized. This course will seek to acquaint students with two hundred years of contributions to the genre. Students will be responsible for a play each week and lectures accompanying class discussion will provide background for the readings. German will be the major language for the course; students may use either English or German for their papers. Two short interpretive papers, based on the texts, will be assigned, one at midterm and the other at the close of the term. There will be a final exam consisting of short essay topics based on the texts. (Grilk)

506. Seminar in the Structure of Modern German. German 415 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course focuses on the morphology and syntax of modern German. We will look at and discuss in detail linguistic concepts such as gender and case, tense, mode, and aspect, and functional sentence perspective, as they apply to the description of modern German. Using the theory of valency as a framework, we will analyse simple and complex sentences. In addition, we will discuss such matters as German word formation and will probe the relationship between gender and sex. In our discussions, we will incorporate findings from other linguistic disciplines such as first and second language acquisition and sociolinguistics to develop a clearer understanding of how cognitive and social characteristics of language users are related to or represented in the morphology and syntax of a given language. There will be a midterm and a final, and the participants of the seminar will give several short oral papers during the course of the term. The language of instruction is German. (Tschirner)

540. Introduction to German Studies. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Proseminar for beginning graduate students, and others by permission, with a maximum of student participation. The course is to inform about: bibliographical tools, literary terminology, various methods to be applied to the study of literary works, of the history of literature from the Renaissance to the present, major aspects of poetics (genres, metrics, etc.) Instructor will speak German, students have the option. Students will give a presentation in class and a term paper resulting from it; there will be a final examination on bibliographical tools and literary terms. (Schelle with Grilk)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

320. German Expressionism in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; sophomores by permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the intellectual, social, and literary and political events in Germany from 1900 to 1930. The subjects covered will include the various forms of art and how they relate to each other and to the cultural and political climate of Germany during that time. Special emphasis will be given to those aspects of the period which eventually proved to be of significant influence on American culture. The format of the course includes lectures and discussion. Included in the course will be the viewing of films of the most important film directors of the time such as Lubitsch, Land, Murnau, Wiene, Pabts, Lamprecht, and Ruttmann, and films indicative of the period but not generally available such as: SIEGFRIED, NOSFERATU, ROSKOLNIKOW, THE CURSED, PANDORA'S BOX, PITZ PALU, and SPIES, among others. A term paper or a final examination will be required. (Fabian)

375/MARC 375/Rel. 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology. (3). (HU).

See Religion 375. (Beck)

449. Special Topics in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Section 001 STRATEGIES OF NARRATING THE HOMELAND: A COMPARATIVE APPROACH. By concentrating on German literature of exile, we will examine the realities of geographical displacement as a theoretical paradigm for disintegration in the modern and postmodern western world. Comparisons with representative English and American fiction will highlight shared devices as well as radical differences between the narrative recuperation of the German HEIMAT and Anglo-American concept of "home." The goal is to discover some of the ways in which the disinherited mind seeks to (re)establish the physical and metaphysical parameters of the self. Readings will include works by Thomas Mann, Brecht, Adorno, Bienek, Siegfried Lenz, Uwe Johnson, and Christa Wolf; for comparison we will read Thomas Wolf, Faulkner, O'Connor, and Joyce. The course will be conducted as a seminar. Requirements include one in-class presentation and a term paper of approximately 25-30 pages that will be written and revised (according to a rigid schedule) during the second half of the term. (Fries)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (FL).

Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, extracts from Swedish literature (prose and poetry), etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Roth)

106. Elementary Danish. Danish 105. (4). (FL).

Second-term Danish is intended for students with some previous knowledge of the language. The emphasis will be placed on developing communicative language skills, but there will also be a review and an extension of the basic grammar introduced in Danish 105. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom. The course will be taught on the basis of a Coursepack including newspaper articles, short stories, and poems. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and examination. The teacher is a native speaker from Denmark. (Hurup)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Roth)

236. Second-Year Danish. Danish 235. (4). (FL).

Fourth-term Danish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Danish up to a level of Danish 235. The course will continue developing written and oral communicative abilities, and also continue grammar review as introduced in Danish 235. Readings are selected from Danish literature and Danish civics (history, sociology, philosophy, etc.) from 1950 up till today All instruction will be in Danish, and grades will be determined on a basis of class participation, written essays, tests at regular intervals, and examination. Students who need Danish 235 or the equivalent for entry into 236 can meet the prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. (Hurup)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

333. Through the Eyes of the Young: Scandinavian Cinema Today. (1). (Excl).

We shall view seven films, starting with Bergman's FANNY AND ALEXANDER, then AKE AND HIS WORLD, LITTLE IDA, HUGO AND JOSEPHINE, JOHNNY LARSEN, I AM MARIA, and THE ELEPHANT WALK. The first week and a half will be devoted to Bergman's film and documentary, plus an exploration of the role of the young as director's persona in the Scandinavian cinema. The remaining three weeks will cover three films per week, arranged in such a way that they provide an interpretation of Scandinavian society from the turn of the century to the 1980's. Knowledge of the Scandinavian language is not required. Grading will be based on weekly quizzes, a short paper, and class participation. (Steene)

421. Modern Scandinavian Literature in English. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

Literature has always dipped its toes in the streams and currents of history, culture, and social trends. In fact, literature has often played the useful role of interpreter/critic of an age, illuminating the raw and painful subject matter that is our daily life. Literature nudges us towards self-understanding and documents our changing views of the world around us. In this course, we will read a selection of poetry, drama, short stories, and novels written by Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish writers. We will examine the history and culture that shaped these writers and will explore the ways that socio-political factors of the times may have influenced the works they produced. Our goal is to become familiar with some important Scandinavian authors and to delve into the historical and cultural world of the Twentieth Century. Works will be read and discussed in English. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is needed. Two 5-7 page papers will be required, and students will be asked to keep a reading journal with their reactions to works read. (Hurup)


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