ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES


Courses in Buddhist Studies (Division 332)

220/Asian Studies 220/Rel. 202. Introduction to World Religions: South and East Asia. (4). (HU).

This course is an introduction to the philosophical, contemplative, ritual and institutional heritage of the major Asian religious traditions. Hinduism (India), Confucianism and Taoism (China), Shinto (Japan), and Buddhism (India, Tibet, China, Japan) will be considered against their historical/cultural backgrounds, and against the background of human religiousness in general. To lend coherence to the vast and highly diverse field of study known as "Asian religions," in dealing with each religion we will focus on certain universal themes, such as death and the afterlife, world denying vs. world affirming ideals, and modes of religious expression in the so-called "great" (philosophical) vs. "little" (popular) traditions. There are three hours of lectures, and one discussion section per week, with use of slides and films. There is no prerequisite for the course, which is itself a prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in Asian religions, especially Buddhism. It also is required for concentration in the Program on Studies in Religion. Requirements will include a midterm and final exam, as well as short papers and quizzes. [Cost:3] [WL:4] (Lopez)

325/Rel. 323. Buddhism in Zen Perspective. (3). (HU).

An introduction to the Buddhism of the Far East, as viewed through the perspective of the historical development of the Zen (Ch'an) school in China, Korea, and Japan. This course serves to complement Buddhist Studies 320/Religion 320, Introduction to Buddhism, which focuses primarily on the origins and development of Buddhism in its native India. Buddhist Studies 325 is designed, however, to stand alone (with no prerequisites) as an introduction to Zen and the Far Eastern religious and cultural milieus in which it has flourished. (Foulk)

406. Classical Tibetan. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to train students of Buddhist Studies in the basic skills necessary for reading Tibetan literature; it is not a class in spoken (colloquial) Tibetan. The plan of the course assumes that the student's primary interest is in the study of Buddhist literature. Accordingly, much time will be spent in reading Buddhist literature (autochthonous as well as in translation from Indic languages). The course offers explanations in the phonology of literary Tibetan ("Lhasa Dialect"), nominal derivation, syntax of the nominal particles, verbal conjugation and suffixes, and the standard script (dbu-can). In the second term all reading exercises will be taken directly from classical sources (primarily from the works of Bu-ston, Taranatha, and Kamalasila). (Gelek)


Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

102. Beginning Chinese. Chinese 101 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

Chinese 102 (Beginning Chinese) is a continuation of Chinese 101. The textbooks are BEGINNING CHINESE and BEGINNING CHINESE READER (Part I and II), both by John DeFrancis. Students are required to listen to tapes after class (at least 5 or 6 hours a week). We meet five hours a week two hours of lecture and three hours of drills. In Chinese 102 we do two lessons from BCR each week. Readings are longer than in Chinese 101 and will take much of a students time outside of class toward the end of the term. Students have to do question-answer sheets twice a week. Students are also required to memorize parts of dialogues similar to those we did in Chinese 101. Toward the end of the term students have to write a skit together with other students and their performance will be video-taped and their pronunciation will be graded. We have a test or quiz each week on Thursdays. In general the workload in Chinese 102 is much heavier than that in Chinese 101. NOTE: NO VISITORS ARE ALLOWED. [Cost:1 or 2] [WL:4] (Tao)

202. Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 201 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

This course is a continuation of Chinese 201. Its goals are twofold: (1) to achieve a basic level of reading competence within a vocabulary of 900 characters and accompanying combinations. (2) to continue improving aural understanding and speaking competence. Classes are conducted solely in Chinese. Students are graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, weekly quizzes or tests, homework assignments, essays. The texts are INTERMEDIATE CHINESE and the movie script UNDER THE BRIDGE. [Cost:3] [WL:1] (Liang)

378. Advanced Spoken Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

This course is designed as a spoken language supplement to the post-second year Chinese reading courses. The prerequisite is two years of modern Chinese (UM courses 101 through 202, or equivalent course at another institution). The purpose of the course is to continue building on the foundation of spoken competence laid down in first and second year Chinese. This is done through conversation, presentation of brief speeches and stories, discussion of materials read and of fellow students' presentations, and through out-of-class preparation for these activities. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Liang)

406. Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 405. (5). (Excl).

Chinese 405 and 406 are a two-term sequence constituting the third year of the Chinese program. All four basic skills reading, writing, listening, and speaking are stressed, but the most time is devoted to learning to read various styles of modern Chinese, including fiction, essays, and documentary and journalistic materials. (Students who want more spoken language work are encouraged to enroll also for Chinese 378, ADVANCED SPOKEN CHINESE). Readings are selected from a large variety of textbook and non-textbook materials, most of them in course pack form. (Baxter)

452. Literary Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (4). (Excl).

This course is a continuation of the introductory term of literary Chinese. We continue to read in a variety of texts covering all premodern periods. Further practice is aimed at improving understanding of the structure of literary Chinese, introductory practice in dictionaries and other aids to interpretation, better familiarity with important grammatical particles. Supplementary areas of concern include policies and problems in using literary Chinese in research, problems of translation, and the general evolution of styles in the literary tradition. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (DeWoskin)

462. Readings in Modern Chinese. Chinese 461 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

This course is continuation of Chinese 461. In addition to building vocabulary we will concentrate on improving reading ability with the aim of allowing students to read original materials with less reliance on a dictionary. Students will also practice discussion on the readings in Chinese. Readings will be chosen from a variety of sources, depending partly on the interests of the students. They will include 20th century fiction and essays on various topics from both Taiwan and Mainland China. There will be frequent translation and composition assignments. The class will be conducted largely in Chinese. [Cost:1] [WL:4] (He)

472. Traditional Chinese Drama and Fiction in Translation. No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (Excl).

This course is a continuation of Chinese 471 from the 13th century to the end of the imperial period (1911), but unlike Chinese 471, it will take as its primary focus the development of fiction and drama in the time period covered and the growth of Chinese literature using the vernacular language. The student will read and discuss selections from a number of major plays and novels as well as examples of shorter fiction and drama in their entirety. Minor genres intermediate between fiction and drama, as well as the representation of ordinary life in prose and autobiography will also be examined. Course requirements are two short papers, a midterm, and a final exam. Required texts include CHINESE THEATER IN THE DAYS OF KUBLAI KHAN, THE PEACH BLOSSOM FAN, TRADITIONAL CHINESE PLAYS (vol. 2), SIX CHAPTERS OF A FLOATING LIFE, and THE STORY OF THE STONE (vol. 1-3), together with a wide variety of materials in course pack form. [Cost:4] [WL:3] (Rolston)

475/Asian Studies 475/Hist. of Art 487/RC Hums. 475/Philosophy 475. The Arts and Letters of China. (4). (HU).

This interdisciplinary course is jointly taught by faculty specialists from the fields of Chinese history, religion, philosophy, art history, drama, and literature. It is NOT a survey course. Instead the focus will be on the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works philosophical, literary, dramatic, visual drawn from several humanistic disciplines in order to present the major themes of Chinese civilization. Our goal is a direct and intense engagement with the ideas and art of a distinct and complex culture and to observe how major themes continue, persist, or change as we move from the past to the present. Background lectures on history, language, and cosmology will be followed by topics and readings that will include: Confucianism (MENCIUS) and Taoism (CHUANG-TZU); recurring themes in Chinese religiosity, Ch'an (Zen Buddhism); classical narratives; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; storyteller tales; the poetic-musical theatre; modern fiction of revolutionary China. Course format: lectures and discussions by Baxter (language); Crump (theatre); DeWoskin (myths and early writings); Edwards (art history); Foulk (religion); Lin (poetry); Feuerwerker (philosophy, traditional and modern fiction). In the fourth hour we will divide into two discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: three short papers and final exam. (Y. Feuerwerker)


Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

102. Beginning Japanese. Japanese 101 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

A thorough grounding is given in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. Attention is given to the social and cultural differences in the use of the language. In the reading and writing component the two KANA syllabaries (KATAKANA and HIRAGANA) and elementary characters (KANJI) are introduced. The goal of this component is to develop proficient reading skills through practice reinforced by oral and written short question-answer exercises. Students are required to practice with audio/video tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). From the first day, recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking and reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist, whose native language is English. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE: PART I (with accompanying audio course set); Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE.[Cost:2] [WL:1] (Unedaya, Kozuka, Staff).

202. Second Year Japanese Japanese 201 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

Further training is given in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired a basic language proficiency. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in more advanced practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. In the reading and writing component, the emphasis is on reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers and essays in response to questions about these texts. Approximately 400 of the essential characters are covered. Discussions of the social and cultural use of language are provided. Students are required to attend 6 hours of class per week: 2 hours of lecture and 4 hours of recitation. Homework includes practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (12 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking and reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE: PART II; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE. (Ohara, Staff)


402. Japanese Literature in Translation: Edo and Modern Periods. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the various forms of Japanese literature in the Edo period (1600-1868) haiku, prose fiction, puppet plays, and Kabuki drama. It will also introduce the student to the rise of the modern psychological novel beginning in the Meiji period (1868-1912) and will focus on the great works of modern Japanese fiction from the Meiji era to the present, including the novels of Natsume Soseki, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, and the Nobel Laureate Kawabata Yasunari. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Ito)

406. Third-Year Japanese. Japanese 405 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Practice in the use of spoken Japanese is contextualized within simulated Japanese social settings. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to produce self-sufficient readers who can read and discuss most texts with the aid of a dictionary. The 881 essential characters plus additional toyo kanji are covered. Students are required to attend 5 hours of class per week: 1 hour of lecture and 4 hours of recitation. Homework includes practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking and reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm and appropriate body language. Texts are Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE: PART III; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE; selected reading materials for Third-Year Japanese. (Oshiro, Staff)

408. Advanced Readings in Modern Japanese Literature. Japanese 407. (4). (Excl).

This course introduces students to modern Japanese fiction (largely short stories) and other materials written by outstanding writers for a mature Japanese audience. It aims to help the student develop precision in reading comprehension through close reading, translation exercises, and class discussions in Japanese. Assignments will be paced to build reading speed. The course will also teach the student how to use dictionaries and other research aids effectively. Requirements include a midterm and a final, as well as occasional papers and written translations. [Cost:5] [WL:1] (Ito)

416. Communicative Competence for Japan Oriented Careers. Japanese 406, 411 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course stresses the effective use of the Japanese spoken language in contexts likely to be encountered by a career-oriented professional in Japan. Topics include: Introductions, Self-Introductions, Exchanging Namecards, Organization, Business Travel, Meetings, Bureaucracy, Distribution, Expansion, Annual Reports, Business Ritual and Socializing. In addition, the course will include practice in rapid reading and transcription/dictation of moderately difficult texts, newspaper articles, and news broadcasts. Texts: Kazuyo Otani, Patricia Wetzel and Robert Sukle, JAPANESE LANGUAGE FOR BUSINESS.

461. Social Science Readings in Japanese. Japanese 406. (4 each). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

This course helps students to develop reading skills necessary to conduct research in Japanese social science topics. Readings are assigned from newspapers and journals in a variety of fields. The emphasis is on the acquisition of specialized terminology and clarification of problems which arise in interpreting these readings. Students are required to attend three hours of class a week. Homework includes a minimum of two hours of preparation per class hour. Students are expected to prepare the readings so they can participate actively in discussion in Japanese in class. There are also weekly translation and Japanese essay assignments on the readings covered in class. (Oshiro)

542. Classical Japanese. Japanese 541 or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

The second half of an introduction to the classical written language with emphasis on its structural characteristics: reading and close analysis of selected texts from the tenth-nineteenth centuries. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Danly)


Courses in South and Southeast Asia (Division 483)

Language Courses

102(302). Beginning Thai. S&SEA 102 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course is the second half of the sequential Elementary Thai courses. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic language skills speaking, listening, reading and writing. The emphases are on practicing pronunciation and simple conversation, reading and writing simple Thai, and expanding students' vocabulary. Four hours of language lab per week are recommended. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Solnit, Boonkhachorn)

104(304). Beginning Indonesian. S&SEA 103 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

The course is the second half of a two-term sequence designed to provide the student with a basic working knowledge of the Indonesian language. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic skills listening, speaking, reading and writing in modern Indonesian. The class emphasizes aural-oral exercises and practice and the learning of culture throughout the course. The text used is keyed to a set of tapes for use in the language lab and concentrates on practical knowledge of the language. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, a series of tests, and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:5] (Florida)

106(306). Elementary Hindi-Urdu. (4). (FL).

South and Southeast Asia 105/106 is the first year in the sequence of courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in Hindi and Urdu, the respective national languages of India and Pakistan. Meeting four times a week, the course is intended to develop students' skills in speaking and in aural comprehension as well as introduce them to the Devanagari writing system. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes and examinations. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Hook, Taj)

108(308). Beginning Tagalog. S&SEA 107 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

Tagalog is the national language of the Philippines. Elementary Tagalog is a two-term sequence designed to give the student who has little or no knowledge of Tagalog the necessary basis for learning to speak it and to have a functional acquaintance with the cultural context in which it functions. Tagalog is particularly interesting in the way it has integrated the broad influences of both Spanish and English into its own syntactic and semantic systems. The oral approach is greatly emphasized in the classroom, using questions and answers and short dialogues to develop active use of the language in the most natural way possible. This is complemented by the use of taped lessons in the Language Laboratory. There are frequent short quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. At the end of the first year, the student should be able to handle brief exchanges in common social situations and to read and write simple Tagalog. For the student specializing in Philippine studies, learning Tagalog is a must. For the student specializing in language studies, a number of linguists of note have found Tagalog structure highly instructive in understanding certain aspects of language. For the student with Philippine affinities, learning Tagalog provides a bond of understanding and for some, a link to one's roots. For the student who has neither a Philippine connection nor a specialist interest in language, learning Tagalog can be rewarding as it provides an experience of new modes of expression and new ways of looking at the world around us and within ourselves. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Naylor)

110(408). Beginning Sanskrit. S&SEA 109 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course continues work on elementary Sanskrit grammar and involves stories in Sanskrit which have been written to fit particular levels of grammar. The goal of the course is to enable the student to read and write basic Sanskrit. (Deshpande)

202(402). Intermediate Thai. S&SEA 201 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course is the second half of the sequential Intermediate Thai courses. It is designed to increase students' speaking, listening, reading and writing abilities, as well as vocabulary expansion. Students practice pronunciation and conversation as well as reading and writing. Four hours of language lab per week are recommended. Evaluations are based on observations of students' progress, midterm and final exams. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Solnit, Boonkhachorn)

204(404). Intermediate Indonesian. S&SEA 203. (3). (FL).

The course is the second half of a two-term sequence aimed at increasing the student's proficiency in the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading and writing in modern Indonesian. Although increasing emphasis is given to the development of reading and writing skills, listening and speaking constitute an integral part of the course which is conducted entirely in Indonesian. Vocabulary building and instruction in matters of cross cultural sensitivity are of great import. The primary text used is keyed to a set of tapes for use in the language lab and concentrates on practical knowledge of the language. Supplementary materials introduce the student to reading modern Indonesian literature. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, a series of tests, and a final exam. [Cost:2] [WL:3] (Florida)

206(406). Intermediate Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 205. (4). (FL).

South and Southeast Asia 205/206 is the second year in the sequence of courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in Hindi and Urdu. Meeting four times a week, the course is intended to increase students' skills in speaking and comprehension as well as introduce them to the Nastaliq writing system used for Urdu. They will continue to develop their proficiency in reading and writing the Devanagari script. Students with strong background in Hindi-Urdu may be able to enter the sequence at this point. See the instructor for placement evaluation. Evaluation is based on attendance, written assignments, and examinations. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Hook, Taj)

208(434). Intermediate Tagalog. S&SEA 207 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This is a two-term sequence in which the student who has some knowledge of Tagalog expands his knowledge, develops fluency, and becomes acquainted with Tagalog literature. While the oral approach continues, there is much greater emphasis on reading and writing and much heavier cultural content in the materials read. In the first term, one meeting a week is devoted to the study of grammar. The rest of the time is spent in oral reading (dramatization) of a series of story episodes in dialogue form, translation, question-and-answer on content, and discussion of the linguistic and cultural aspects of each episode. Written homework is regularly assigned. To complement the grammar lessons and the dialogues, tapes are available at the Language Laboratory. There will be occasional quizzes, a midterm, and a final. We have conversation hour once a week throughout the term. The second term is essentially a continuation of the first. Instead of dialogues, however, we read narratives and essays and instead of studying grammar separately, we integrate it with work on the readings which provide the framework for the discussion of grammatical points. At the end of the second year, the student should have acquired (a) sufficient competence to handle casual conversation, write brief letters, read texts of low to medium complexity, and (b) a broader knowledge of the culture that the language is an expression of and in which the language functions. (Naylor)

306(506). Advanced Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 205 and 206. (3). (FL). May be elected twice for a total of six credits.

South and Southeast Asia 305/306 is the third year in the sequence of courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in Hindi and Urdu. Meeting three hours a week, the course is intended to further students' skills in speaking and aural comprehension as well as increase their proficiency in reading and writing both Hindi and Urdu. Students with prior work in Hindi-Urdu may be able to enter the sequence at this point. See the instructor for placement evaluation. Evaluation is based on written homework assignments, quizzes, and examinations. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Bashir, Taj)

310(508). Advanced Sanskrit. S&SEA 309 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course continues work on advanced grammar of classical Sanskrit and also involves reading simple stories, parts of Sanskrit dramas and other similar classical literary texts. The goal of the course is to prepare the student to read non-technical classical Sanskrit. (Deshpande)

402(502). Advanced Thai. S&SEA 401 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course is the second half of the two course sequence of Advanced Thai. The course is designed to improve students' proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of the Thai language. The course is flexible and tailored to suit students' needs and interests. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Solnit, Boonkhachorn)

404(504). Advanced Indonesian. S&SEA 403. (3). (FL).

The course is the second of a two-term sequence aimed at the further development of the student's proficiency in the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading and writing in modern Indonesian. The coursework is designed to improve the student's command of basic grammatical structures as well as to build advanced vocabulary. Socio-cultural orientation will increase the student's familiarity with the important socio-linguistic aspects of Indonesian language use. The course stresses active manipulation of a practical vocabulary for both formal and informal language situations. Readings further the student's exposure to modern Indonesian Literature. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests and a final exam or project. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Florida)

464. Advanced Readings of Modern Indonesian Texts II. S&SEA 404 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course is the second half of a two-term sequence designed to introduce the student to critical readings of Modern Indonesian texts. A reading and speaking knowledge of Modern Indonesian is prerequisite. With an emphasis on text analysis, the student is required to produce critical commentaries on (and sometimes translations of) selected passages from a variety of texts. The commentaries will be written in Indonesian. The course is run as a seminar with discussion conducted in Indonesian. Evaluation is based on the written assignments and classroom performance. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Florida)


Courses in Asian Studies (Division 323)

100. Contemporary Events in China: Beijing Spring, 1989. No background in Chinese or Asian Studies required. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

A new course, "Contemporary Events in China: Beijing Spring 1989," will be offered in the Fall and Winter terms 1989-90. Designed as a multidisciplinary, university-wide forum for the discussion of current developments in the People's Republic of China, visiting professors and noted experts from government, business, and journalism with professional experience in contemporary Chinese affairs will present a series of public lectures. The course, designated "Asian Studies 100," carries one unit of credit and will meet for three public lectures. In addition, students will receive two supplementary lectures given by Center for Chinese Studies' faculty. Students will be expected to attend all lectures, do additional readings appropriate for the topic of each lecture, and take one final exam at the end of the term. Grading will be done on a credit/no credit basis. The course is intended primarily for non-social science students with no prior coursework in Asian Studies. The unique format of the course is designed to encourage enrollment of students on a university-wide basis, particularly from the professional schools. Topics to be considered include the impact of current events in China on the University of Michigan, the domestic dynamics of Beijing Spring, intellectual currents in China and East Asia, the role of the media in China Spring, and the political, military, and economic implications for East Asia and the United States resulting from current events in China. (Lieberthal)

112/History 152. Southeast Asian Civilization. (4). (SS).

This course offers an introduction to the culture and history of Southeast Asia, one of the world's most variegated cultural zones and an area of repeated and intense international conflict. Geographic coverage will include Vietnam, Burma, and Thailand on the mainland, and Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines in the islands. Students will examine the glory and decline of ancient Southeast Asian civilizations; the colonial transformation of the region; the rise of nationalism; and recurrent post-1945 tensions. Other topics will include: the role of religion, including Buddhism and Islam, in contemporary Southeast Asia; Chinese immigration; and recent economic trends. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Southeast Asia. (Lieberman)

122/History 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia. (4). (SS).

See History 122. (Young)

220/Buddhist Studies 220/Rel. 202. Introduction to World Religions: South and East Asia. (4). (HU).

See Buddhist Studies 220. (Lopez)

381. Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators. Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies. (3). (Excl).

This course examines the politics, economy, culture, and society of China and Japan in their last phases of imperial and feudal structures, respectively (16th to 19th centuries). Although Japan learned a great deal from China throughout the earlier centuries, it nonetheless developed social and political institutions significantly different from their model. We will compare and contrast the two countries by focusing on such topics as the role of the state, meaning of emperor, the ruling class (gentry and samurai), the state ideology (Neo-Confucianism) and its relationship to popular religion, family and population, cities and commerce, peasants and production, and education. In addition to offering a comparative analysis of the two societies, the course also aims to introduce the historiographical differences which characterize the present state of scholarship on China and Japan. This is a Junior/Senior Writing Course, and students are required to write three short essays (5 pages each) and one long paper (about 10 to 15 pages). The short essays consist of: (1) a book review; (2) a critical analysis of a historical problem; and (3) a historiographical review of a defined topic. The long paper may be an expansion of one of the three papers completed or a new research paper. (Tonomura)

395. Honors Seminar. Honors candidate in Asian Studies. (3). (Excl).

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

428/Econ. 428/Phil. 428/Pol. Sci. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. Not recommended for Asian Studies concentrators. (4). (Excl).

See Political Science 428. (Oksenberg)

475/Chinese 475/Hist. of Art 487/RC Hums. 475/Philosophy 475. The Arts and Letters of China. (4). (HU).

See Chinese 475. (Y. Feuerwerker).


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