GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

COURSES IN DUTCH (DIVISION 357)

112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course. Dutch 111 or the equivalent. (4). (LR).
This course, a continuation of 111, proceeds with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will primarily use the monolingual text LEVEND NEDERLANDS (Living Dutch), in which each lesson consists of an everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a comprehensive vocabulary list of one topic, questions about the conversation, discussion and homework. To enliven the class, the teacher will present the students with a variety of texts, music, video, and simple prose, which can serve as a starting point for conversation. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Broos)

232. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 231 or the equivalent. (4). (LR).
This course, a continuation of Dutch 231, will further examine the particular difficulties and subtleties of Dutch grammar and style. Grammatical items introduced in previous courses will be reviewed where necessary. Introduction to contemporary Dutch society by means of songs, video, comics, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course, which will be conducted mostly in Dutch. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Broos)

339. Independent Study. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.
This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Dutch Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Courses in the past covered different areas like Dutch-Indonesian literature, the language of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, Dutch between English and German, etc. Courses must be supervised by a faculty member and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. [Cost:1] [WL:2] (Broos)

492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001: Making Things Real.
Dutch novelist Herman Stevens, writer-in-residence at the Germanic Department, will conduct a course on the Art of Fiction, combining Creative Writing and discussion of some major Dutch novels in translation. Students are expected to submit short stories for class discussion. Questions on Dutch and European culture are welcomed. Grades will be determined by class participation as well as by the written assignments. Cost:1 (Stevens)

495. Topics in Dutch Literature. Dutch 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
The course will examine prose and poetry of both the Netherlands and Belgium. Issues like the influence of the Second World War, feminist writing, Dutch Indies Literature are among the many topics that will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and point of view of (modern) Dutch literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his works. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. [Cost:1] (Broos)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100. (4). (LR).
First course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German", to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions, readings, and videos. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are chapter tests and a final. The language of instruction is German. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).
Second course of a two-term sequence in elementary German. See German 101 for a general description. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).
Course for students who have had two to three years of high school German or one or more terms of college German not at the University of Michigan but who are not yet at second-year performance level. This course is designed to develop the ability to understand and speak "everyday German," to develop reading and writing skills, and to get to know the German-speaking world through discussions, readings, and videos. Ample opportunity is provided to develop conversational skills in a wide variety of situations encountered in German-speaking cultures. Additional time outside of class is required to listen to cassettes, to watch videos, to read, and to study the structure of the German language. There are three major test and a final. These sections meet FIVE times per week. Students may enroll in 231 upon satisfactory completion of this course. The language of instruction is German. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).
The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. The course prerequisite is German 111 or a placement examination (CEEB, GSFLT, or departmental). Like German 111, German 112 is open only to graduate students and undergraduates in special programs. [Cost:1] [WL: 4] (Section 001:Schelle; Section 002:Hofacker)

230. Intensive Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 221, 222, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).
This course provides highly motivated students the opportunity to complete the two-term intermediate German sequence in one term. You will be expected to increase the level of accuracy at which you can express yourself and the range of situations in which you can function in German-speaking cultures. We will read and discuss a variety of brief fiction and non-fiction texts, e.g. fairy tales, short stories, newspaper and magazine articles. Toward the end of the term, we will read a longer literary work, such as DER RICHTER UND SEIN HENKER or DIE PHYSIHER. There will be an extensive review of German grammar; however, the majority of the class time will be devoted to discussing the assigned texts and working on small group activities. Films, short videos, and contemporary German music will supplement classroom instruction. There will be weekly quizzes on individual readings and grammatical features as well as a comprehensive final. You will also have to write compositions regularly. The language of instruction is German. [Cost:2] [WL:2] (Gramberg)

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).
First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. There are three hourly tests and a final examination. Students write essays related to class readings. The language of instruction is German. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR).
Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. See German 231 for a general description. The language of instruction is German. [Cost:3] [WL:2]

236. Scientific German. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 232. (4). (LR).
The purpose of this course is to provide basic practice in the reading and translation of texts primarily from the natural sciences. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation. Students will also select and translate an outside article in their field. Quizzes are given in addition to a final exam. Texts supplied by instructor. [Cost: 1] [WL: 3] (Paslick)

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
SECTION 001. The sequence of German 325 and 326 is required for concentration in German. It is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. A portion of each hour is devoted to a systematic grammar review. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of two pages is assigned every two weeks. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:4 (Schelle)

SECTION 002. The sequence of German 325 and 326 is required for concentration in German. It is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final Cost:2 WL:4 (Cowen)

326. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
SECTION 001.
German 326, a continuation of 325, is required for German concentrators. Except by special permission of the instructor, only students who have completed 325 should elect 326. The course is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is spent on a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen by both students and the instructor. A German essay of one to two pages is assigned approximately every week. Two brief oral presentations may be required. There will be a midterm and a final examination. Texts: Cochran's German Review Grammar, 4th edition and ZUR DISKUSSION, 3rd ed., by Sevin and Sevin. Cost:2 WL:4 (Scholler)

SECTION 002. The sequence of German 325 and 326 is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on a discussion of a reading text and of other topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations. Cost:1 WL:2 (Dunnhaupt)

SECTION 003. See German 325.002 (Cowen)

329. Independent Study. Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.
Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

351. Business German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
The course is designed to introduce students to the terminology and practices of procedures used in German business, industry, trade, banking and insurance and the journals, newspapers and reports covering their activities. The subjects covered range from advertising to financial transactions and reports. The course is a continuation of German 350 which is not a prerequisite to 351. The text will consist of readings from actual German business reports and transactions taken from journals, newspapers and professional journals and advertising. The emphasis in the course will be on banking, commerce and international trade. There will be a selected list of outside reading in English such as William Manchester's THE ARMS OF KRUPP and others. [Cost: 1] [WL: 4] (Fabian)

383. German Lyric Poetry. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).
This course introduces students with a few years of the language to German lyric poetry, written from the age of Goethe to the present. We will use the latest edition of the anthology by Echtermeyer and von Wiese, DEUTSCHE GEDICHTE and we will supplement it with mimeographed materials and (for LEIDER settings) with records and tapes. During the first half of the term, we will learn the basic principles of metrics and traditional poetic forms. But the main purpose and the focus of the course is the comparative analysis and critical interpretation of selected poems. The possibilities as well as the limits of interpretation and evaluation will be established through discussions. We will also take a close look at some published translations and will attempt our own English versions. Method: Guided discussions (instructor will speak German, students have the choice) and occasional background lectures. Student evaluation: Several short interpretive papers, a midterm and a final exam, all to be done in English, on the basis of the German texts. (Seidler)

385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).
The texts provide an introduction to German short stories and novellas of the twentieth century, from the periods before and between the world wars (Mann and Kafka) to recent prose fiction (Grass). In conjunction with German 381, 382, 383, or 384 this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The emphasis is on the analysis of the individual works, but some historical and literary background material will be included. The texts read in recent terms were by Kafka, Mann, Musil, Boll, Durrenmatt and Grass. The major language is German, but not exclusively. Two short interpretive papers will be assigned for the term; they may be in English or German. The final exam will consist of essay questions concerning the texts for the term. [Cost:1] [WL: 4] (Paslick)

426. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 325 and 326; or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
In this course various approaches will be used to improve the student's proficiency. Since only German is used in this class, it cannot be taken in fulfillment of the ECB requirement. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on the history and culture of the German-speaking countries and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Video cassettes will also be integrated into the course. Each student is expected to give a brief presentation and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on compositions as well as class participation. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425. [Cost: 1] [WL: Call the instructor at 663-9673] (Weiss)

450. Medieval German Literature in Modern German Translation. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
The course is designed for concentrators of German as well as students in other fields who have a sufficient knowledge of German. It is an introduction to the study of the main literary genres of the centuries between approximately 700 and 1300. The readings will be selected from heroic, spiritual, courtly, and post-courtly literature. They will include the earliest medieval drama, Europe's first animal epic and its first chivalric romance, its finest Tristan story and its best known Parzival-Grail romance, the 'Nibelungenlied,' and pre-Boccaccian novella. The lyrics of the German troubadours will be treated, with musical illustrations, in the latter part of the term. The discussions will center upon thematic and moral concerns, ideological and cultural background as well as formal aspects of the works. Attention will also be directed to other literatures of the Middle Ages (e.g., Scandinavian, English, French). Texts: Books, as far as available, and course pack. Method of instruction: Lectures in German, discussions in German and English. The grade will be determined on the basis of class participation, a midterm exam, and a paper of medium length. Cost:1 WL:4 (Scholler)

451. 16th and 17th Century Literature. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
A survey of 16th and 17th century literature. This course offers an introduction to the lively world of the Renaissance, to its manners and mores, its intellectual life, and the exciting new discoveries that mark the beginnings of modern times. On the basis of major literary works like the SHIP OF FOOLS, we gain first-hand insights into social and cultural activities, art, architecture, music, and the sciences. Readings from Martin Luther introduce us to the religious and philosophical turmoils of the period. Other readings include the Master Singers of Nuremberg, Baroque poetry, as well as an early comedy. A visit to the Rare Books Collection will help us trace the progress from manuscript to the invention of printing and the early development of the new media. Slides and tapes will augment lectures on art, architecture, and music. Each student will present an oral report of his own choice (in English). There is a final exam (no midterm). Prerequisite: German 325 or permission of instructor. (Dunnhaupt)

453. German Classical Literature. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
The course will consist of an intensive reading of works by Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, and Kleist. Readings will be drawn from several genres, including drama, lyric poetry, and theoretical essays. Necessary background material, including consideration of what "classical" means in the context of German literary history, will be presented via short lectures. The main body of the course, however, will be discussion of the primary works. There will be some reading in secondary literature, and two short papers will be required. There will be a final examination. The primary language of the class room will be German, but students may write their papers and the final examination in English. Cost:1 WL:4 (Crichton)

492. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.
German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber. [Cost: Independent Study purchase of books is students' affair] WL:3 (Fries)

499. Seminar in German Studies. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001. Doing Business in German: Advanced German for the Business Professions.
The goals of German 499 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) of Business German, as well as to familiarize the participants with the business practices of the target culture. To attain a broad functional proficiency the course will be divided into four major blocks: I. Management, II. Marketing in the German environment, III. Accounting, and IV. Finance in the German system. The focus is particularly on Germany's position in the European community and on its role in the 1992 unification of Europe. Additionally, the course will emphasize the background of the unification, the expectations of the Europeans, business opportunities after 1992 and Germany's role in world trade. The materials used throughout the course consist of a course pack, newspapers, German business reports and videotapes. Two research papers will be required during the course, as well as oral presentations on the findings. Grades will be based on the two papers, the oral reports, and class participation. The course is conversation oriented and it will be conducted in German. Thus, as a prerequisite, participants must have had at least three years of university level German. Qualified undergraduates as well as graduates are welcome. Participants may, by the end of the course, choose to take a special examination to obtain a certificate PRüFUNG WIRTSCHAFTSDEUTSCH. This certificate provides the Business German students with an official certificate, which is accepted by German companies. Cost:1 WL:4 (Gramberg)

506. Seminar in the Structure of Modern German. German 415 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: Introduction to Experimental German Phonetics.
Prerequisite: equivalent of Linguistics 412 or permission of instructor. This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in conducting laboratory research in phonetics. During the term students will be trained to use a variety of instruments for collecting and analyzing data, including several methods of computer-aided acoustic analysis. After a brief review of articulatory and acoustic phonetics, the seminar will focus on readings intended to aid us in designing two experiments: one in speech production and the other in speech perception. The experiments will be conducted as group projects. Specifically, each students is expected to participate in designing the experiments, running subjects and analyzing the data. However, each student is to write their own versions of the experiments individually. Evaluation is based on leading one discussion session, class participation, project participation and two papers (write-ups of the experiments). (Cooper)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

442. Faust and the Faust Legend in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be however the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's TRAGICALL HISTORY OF THE LIFE AND DEATH OF DOCTOR FAUSTUS, Goethe's FAUST, A TRAGEDY (both Parts; tr. Arndt), Thomas Mann's DOCTOR FAUSTUS: THE LIFE OF THE GERMAN COMPOSER ADRIAN LEVERKUHN AS TOLD BY A FRIEND (tr. Lowe-Porter), and Mikhail Bulgakov's THE MASTER AND MARGARITA (tr. Glenny), and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic and social issues that they raise. No knowledge of German required (but German concentrators will be required to read Goethe and Mann in the original). May be used to fulfill, by petition, the Humanities distribution requirement. (Amrine)

445. Holocaust Literature in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
This course will examine the ideas and events in German society, culture and history which can be identified as having contributed to the events known as the Holocaust. Relevant historical and cultural events of various periods as they reflect on this topic and are evidenced in literature, laws and community life will be identified. The time period to be covered extends from the Roman period of German history with its archiological and anthropological evidence of Jewish life during that period through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Enlightenment to modern times. Events covered will be the effect of the Crusades on Jewish community life and Christian-Jewish relationships along with the role of the Church and its theological edicts. This will be followed by the events of the Middle Ages and the exodus of both German and Jewish communities to the Slavic lands and the role of the Ghetto in preserving medieval German customs in the form of clothing, names and above all language in the form of Yiddish with its clearly Germanic roots. The period of German Humanism will focus on the writings of men such as Erasmus, Reuchlin, Pirkheimer, Melanthron and Luther and the effect of including Hebrew as one of learned languages of that age with the resulting intellectual contact, while maintaining exclusion and persecution on the cultural and community level. The period of the Enlightenment with its emerging bourgeoisie energy and its emphasis on tolerance will include the writing of figures such as Henrietta Herz, Rachel Levine Varnhagen, Dorothea Schlegel and Moses Mendelsohn who pioneered in leading their co-religionists into what appeared to be the main stream of German culture, society and intellectual life. The last period covered will be the era following the founding of the German empire in 1871 and will trace the course of seemingly continuing emancipation and its parallel rise of a new form of anti-Semitism. The origin and effect of the racial basis of anti-Semitism as found in the writings of Paul de Lagarde, Moeller van den Bruck, Erwin Mohler and the racial edicts of National Socialism during the 1933-42 period will constitute the concluding part of the course. The course will not deal with the actual events of the Holocaust as such. (Fabian)

447. Women and German Literature. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: German Women Writers: 1750 to the Present.
In this course, we will examine the works of German women writers, the themes of "otherness," and the relationship between gender and the construction of the self. The selected texts, all of which are to be read in English translation, include the representative genres of the diary, letters, the epistolary novel, drama, short stories, and novels. The reading thematizes the ways in which oppositional thinking influenced women's writing from an historical perspective, concentrating on the division between the self and the other. This thought pattern has become associated with other oppositions: active/passive, healthy/sick, good/evil, and male/female. We will read the texts with attention to the construction and inscription of female identity, as well as with attention to the material conditions of writing. Class discussions will focus on the theme of sexual difference and its representation in literature produced by women. Readings include: Bitter Healing: German Women Writers 1700-1830, Ingeborg Bachmann's Malina, Christa Wolf's The Quest for Christa T, theoretical texts by Hélène Cixous and Julia Kristeva. There will be one short, ungraded paper, one in-class presentation, a pre-paper outline and consultation in preparation for the final paper. There are no prerequisites. Those with a reading knowledge of German are encouraged to read the texts in the original language. Cost:2 WL:4 (Simpson)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

104. Elementary Swedish. Swedish 103. (4). (LR).
Second-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish, up to a level of Swedish 103. The emphasis is placed on developing communicative language skills, both written and oral, review and extension of basic grammar. Oral, written and listening exercises will be employed in the classroom and the language lab. The textbook will be supplemented by newspaper articles, radio news, some Swedish poems, etc. The instruction will principally be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 103 or the equivalent for entry into 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

106. Elementary Danish. Danish 105. (4). (LR).
Second-term Danish is intended for students with some previous knowledge of the language up to the level of 105. The emphasis will be on the development of communicative language skills, but there will also be an extension of the basic grammar introduced in Danish 105. The course will be taught on the basis of the text and grammar book AKTIV DANSK by Lise Bostrup and beside that we will work with a course pack, including newspaper articles, short stories, poems, and a tape including texts from music. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and examination (oral and written). The instructor is a native speaker. Cost:1 WL:2 (Lund)

234. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 233. (4). (LR).
Fourth-term Swedish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Swedish up to a level of Swedish 233. The emphasis is placed on further developing on both oral and written communicative language skills, review and extension of Swedish grammar, Swedish literature and Swedish civics (history, politics, traditions, etc.). Extracts from Swedish novels, poems, newspaper articles, and documentary articles will be used. Oral, written, and listening exercises will be employed. All instruction will be in Swedish. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and class participation. Students needing Swedish 233 or the equivalent for entry into 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. Cost:1 WL:4 (Olvegård)

236. Second-Year Danish. Danish 235. (4). (LR).
Fourth-term Danish is intended for students with a previous knowledge of Danish up to a level of Danish 235. The course will continue the development of written and oral communicative skills, besides grammar review as introduced in Danish 235. The course will be taught on the basis of the text book HILDUR by Fridrika Geirsdottir and Peter Söby Kristensen and besides that we will work with a course pack containing authentic readings selected from Danish writers between 1900 and 1991. Danish civics (history, sociology, art, philosophy) are represented from Danish newspapers as POLITIKEN and WEEKENDAVISEN. A tape is also made including phonetic drills and texts from the course pack. As in Danish 235, instruction will be given in Danish, and grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written essays, and examination (oral and written). Students who need Danish 235, or the equivalent, for entry into 236 may meet the prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor. The instructor is a native speaker. Cost:1 WL:2 (Lund)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

413/Hist. of Art 413/Architecture 413. Architecture and Art of Scandinavia. (3). (Excl).
A study of the art and architecture of Scandinavia from ancient times to the present, with emphasis on contemporary developments. Upon completion of the course the student should be able to: 1). trace the chronological developments of Scandinavian architecture and art from its beginnings to the present; 2). identify the main styles, trends, and individuals of this development; and 3). relate this to the essential cultural, political, economic, and social factors in these countries. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (K. Marzolf)

421 Modern Scandinavian Literature in English. Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3).
Around the Turn of the Century the modern break-through in Scandinavian literature around the last turn of the century.


"What are we going to do with the starling?" When we are talking about literature, or art in general, these is something artificial about limiting one's view of a single country or a single language. No literature has developed in total isolation, but ideological and formalistic movements cut across national boundaries. It's also the fact in Scandinavia where literary trends of Germany, France, Italy, Spain and England have made their way to the northern Europe in various disguise. What is more remarkable is that Scandinavia shares a common heritage which not only has to do with a mutually intelligible language, but a heritage of ethnic and political character which roots extend back to the introduction of Christianity. Several critics talk about the last turn of the century as "a golden age" with its pure language and its opening towards a new era in literature the modernism -. First of all it's interesting to read the highlights from about 1880-1940, but the reading also forms the basis of an understanding of the contemporary literature and makes it intelligibly why the authors created new linguistic languages and literary forms. The course will try to find some ways out of the modernistic labyrinth by reading Scandinavain prose in English translation: Sören Kierkegaard, Georg Brandes, Knut Hamsun, August Strindberg, Karen Blixen, I.P. Jacobsen, Herman Bang, John V. Jensen and M.A. Nexö. (Lund)

460. Issues in Modern Scandinavia. Introductory sociology or introductory political science, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

Section 001: The Welfare State and Society in Scandinavia. This course presents a sociological perspective on the Scandinavian welfare state. It examines how and to what degree state policies have modified social inequalities in the four Scandinavian societies. Topics include: work place democracy, family policies and alienation. There will be exams and a term paper. Class discussion is emphasized. Texts and assigned readings. Cost:3 WL:1 (Bjorn)

Section 002: Feminist Film Criticism. This seminar will focus on the question of feminine subjectivity and desire with their (alleged) non-representationality within patriarchal discourse. The main issues for discussion will be those of "ideology and subjectivity," "motherhood and narrative" and "melodrama as a text of muteness" as well as the "female star as a commodity." In addition, thought by theoreticians such as Althusser, Foucault, Kristeva, Doane, DeLauretis, Johnston and Gledhill will be applied to readings of the early films of Ingrid Bergman (Swedish melodramas of the 1930s) and their American remakes, as well as certain popular American woman's films. Student evaluation will be on the basis of participation in class discussion of films and readings, short papers, term paper and final exam. The seminar will emphasize critical theory and analysis. Viewings of videos will be done individually in the MLB language lab. Segments to be used in seminar. Texts, course pack and reserve readings. Cost:2 WL:1 (Soila)

481. Topics in Scandinavian Film. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.
Section 001 Cinema: Swedish Film Beyond Bergman.
This course covers Scandinavian film, especially Swedish films, in a historical and cultural/political context. It will also apply different aspects of contemporary film theory to an analysis and interpretation of each film as a system of representation. Films by Ingmar Bergman are well known internationally, but Scandinavian cinema has a rich and impressive history. The national features of theses films and pan-Scandinavian trends will be discussed, as well as attitudes toward the medium itself in Scandinavia. Is film an art or an industry? Negative social impacts on audiences will also be discussed in relation to social policy. The films will be shown on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings in the Michigan Theatre, and students will purchase a coupon book of tickets for $30 lab fee, which admits them to both showings. Additional videos will be shown in class to supplement or for intensive study of portions of these works. There will be weekly lecture and discussion. Students will write several short papers applying film analysis and take a final exam. Texts and assigned readings and course pack. Film list available from 3110 MLB. (Soila)


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