Courses in Women's Studies (Division 497)

230. The Contemporary Women's Movement. (3). (SS).
This course is a cultural history of the contemporary U.S. women's movement. After examining its origins in the movements for African-American political and civil rights in both the 19th and 20th centuries, and in the contexts of the Civil War and the Vietnam War, we will plot various shifts in and challenges to the women's movement through the 1960's 70s, and 80s. We will consult a variety of materials, from legislative debated and political manifestos to literary and visual works and acts of cultural resistance. We will also take up some of the most significant philosophical debates among feminist in the last 330 years. Are women the same as men or different from them? How are women different from each other, and how can we speak from women of all races, classes, and sexualities? Can we afford to fight within the system, or to fight outside it? Does feminism exist anymore, or are we all post-feminist women? WL:1 (Umphrey)

240/Amer. Cult. 240. Introduction to Women's Studies. Open to all undergraduates. (4). (HU).
Designed as an introduction to the new, feminist scholarship on women, Women's Studies 240 is an interdisciplinary course which acquaints students with key concepts and theoretical frameworks to analyze women's condition. We will explore how women's status has changed over time and across cultures, but we will concentrate on the situation of contemporary American women. Topics will include: violence against women, discrimination in the workplace, the feminization of poverty, and sexuality. Students will also examine how capitalism, racism, imperialism, and heterosexism affect women's lives. The course will not only provide students with an analysis of women's oppression, but will suggest strategies for ending sexual inequality. The course is structured around weekly lectures, readings, films, and discussion sections. Students are encouraged to participate fully in discussion and to assume responsibility for sharing their knowledge and experience. The course grade is based upon written assignments, an action project, examination and participation in discussion. Cost:3 WL:4

270. Women and the Law. (3). (SS).
"Women and the Law" covers selected topics in American constitutional and statutory law which have a special effect on women. The class focuses on ideals of sex equality and how they are incorporated into the American legal system. Topics usually covered include constitutional equality, employment discrimination, family law, rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, reproductive rights, pornograhy and women in poverty. Required: midterm examination, 10-12 pages of writing, final examination and class participation in discussion. Some understanding of the history of women of color in the United States is also strongly recommended.

315/English 315. Women and Literature. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
See English 315.

342. Gender and Society: Hierarchies in Social Organization. Women's Studies 240 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
This course will be organized around four (4) modules: (1) Comparative Systems of Reproduction, Gender and Class: Conceptual Framework (we will look schematically at the position of women in certain types of "lineage" society, Euro-feudal society, colonial-slave society, and early industrial capitalist society). (2) Comparative Foundations of White (Elite) Womanhood in "America": Southern and Caribbean white-creole "ladies" (planter-class women), Northeastern urban bourgeois women (and the cultural foundations of bourgeois feminism in the U.S.) (3) Comparative American Slave Systems (and Implications for Black Womanhood): Caribbean and Southern U.S.A. (4) First World/Third World Perspectives: Patterns of industrialization; experiences and representations of gender; meanings of feminism. The course is meant to accommodate both those persons needing a general typological overview and conceptual framework and those wanting to pursue relevant research in greater comparative depth. Classes will be organized around a seminar-type format. Requirements are: a five-page conceptual framework; a midterm take-home exam; and a final paper. Cost:3 WL:2 (Green)

343. Gender Consciousness and Social Change. Women's Studies 240 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: Gender and Power in Latin America.
Gender is a crucial aspect of the organization of inequality and equality throughout Latin American. This course explores the relationship between the construction of identities, gender, and power in Latin America. We will examine how gender representations are constructed, assumed, and contested in a variety of sites. These include: the media and telenovelas ("soap operas"), the new social movements, processes of militarization and repression, and the integration of Latin America into the global economy. Students will write two short papers based on class assignments and a final paper. (Koreck)

347. Feminist Perspective on Lesbian Studies. Women's Studies 240. (3). (Excl).
This course will survey the parameters of debate in regard to the historical and literary study of lesbianism. We will explore the ways in which lesbians have organized, constructed and represented their sexuality, and the mechanisms used to repress lesbian desire. Although lesbianism will be the focus of this course, we will also examine the ways its history is part of a larger historical and cultural context. We will discuss current and historical theories of sexuality. Topics include women's romantic friendships, the early twentieth-century medical explanations of lesbianism and male homosexuality, and their appropriation and redefinition by lesbians and gay men, the changing representations of lesbianism in literature and film and the various ways in which class and race affect fictional. autobiographical and theoretical accounts of lesbianism, as well as films and videos. Two papers, co-leading one class, and a final exam are required. (Vicinus)

371/History 371. Women in American History Since 1870. (3). (Excl).
See History 371. (Echols)

385. Directed Reading. Women's Studies 100 or 240, one 300-level Women's Studies course, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).
Offers advanced Women's Studies students an opportunity to purpose independent, interdisciplinary projects. (Pursue)

386. Directed Reading. Women's Studies 385. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).
Offers advanced Women's Studies students an opportunity to purpose independent, interdisciplinary projects. (Pursue)

387. Directed Reading. Women's Studies 386. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).
Offers advanced Women's Studies students an opportunity to purpose independent, interdisciplinary projects. (Pursue)

394(294)/Great Books 394. Great Books by Women Writers. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (4). (HU).
See Great Books 394. (Herrmann)

430/Amer. Cult. 430. Theories of Feminism. Women's Studies 240 and one 340-level course, or permission of instructor.
Section 001. Black Feminist Thought.
For Winter Term, 1992, this course is jointly offered with CAAS 458.001.

480. Special Topics. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: Gender and Film.
For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with Film/Video 455.001.

Section 002: La Latina. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with American Culture 410.001. (Moya-Raggio)

Section 003: Women and Health. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with Sociology 401. (Anspach)

Section 004: Women in the Political System. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with Political Science 418. (Burns)

Section 005: Feminist Film Criticism. For Winter Term, 1992, this course is jointly offered with Scandinavian Studies 460. (Soila)

Section 006. Classical Mythologies/Renaissance Bodies. For Winter Term, 1992, this course is jointly offered with RC Hums 472 and MARC 403. (Simons)

Section 007: Women Writers of Africa and the Diaspora. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with English 417.011. (Gregg)

Section 009: Social Science Research Methods From a Feminist Perspective. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with RC Social Science 360.003. (Jayaratne)

Section 010: Women in International Division of Labor. For Winter Term 1992 this course is jointly offered with RC Social Science 360.001. (Green)

491. Honors Thesis. Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).
Provides Women's Studies Honors concentrators an opportunity for independent study under close supervision from their faculty advisor while preparing an Honors thesis.


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