Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 5:13 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Biological Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRBIO

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Biological Anthropology.


ANTHRBIO 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrbio/161/001.nsf

What is the material basis of evolution? How have humans evolved? Why do humans behave in the manner that they do? This course seeks to answer these enduring questions. The course will be divided into three parts. We will begin by reviewing the theory of evolution and examining how evolution produces adaptations and creates new species. This section will conclude by outlining how evolution has shaped the behavior of our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates. The second part of the course will be devoted to investigating the human fossil record and tracing the physical and behavioral evolution of our species. The course will conclude by asking how evolution has affected contemporary human behavior. The emphasis throughout will be on the processes that have shaped human evolution and how these have produced who we are. The course includes three lectures plus one discussion/lab meeting per week. Grades will be based on three midterms and GSI evaluation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRBIO 362. Problems of Race.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles L Brace (clbrace@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrbio/362/001.nsf

The subject matter covered in this course is different from but complementary to that covered in Anthropology 347 which is more concerned with race relations. Anthropology 362, on the other hand, addresses itself to two main problem areas where race is concerned: (1) the common concept of race has an inadequate foundation in biology and must be dispensed with before we can make sense out of the very real aspects of human biological variation. This portion of the course treats the dimensions of human biological differences that can be traced according to selective force distributions and their changes through time. These will be contrasted with the biological traits that show regional clustering but which have no adaptive value and cannot therefore be hierarchically arranged. (2) If the common concept of race has an inadequate biological base, how did we get stuck with our generally held assumptions when it would appear that they owe more to folklore than to biology? This portion of the course deals principally with the history of the race concept. All the material covered by the course will be dealt with in lecture. Supplementary readings will be suggested from time to time, along with specific sections in the assigned texts.

Texts: C.L. Brace, The Stages of Human Evolution. Lecture outlines (syllabus) and C.L. Brace, Race is a Four Letter Word will be available at Kinko's copying.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRBIO 364. Nutrition and Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andres R Frisancho (arfrisan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrbio/364/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is to study nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically this course will examine:

  1. the evolutionary roots including mammalian evolutionary history, primate origins, fossil evidence from australopithecine to Homo sapiens
  2. food procurement through hominid evolution including the archaeological evidence about the evolutionary roots of human diet, the evolution of the digestive system and brain size of non-human and human primates;
  3. food and nutrients which examines the physiology of nutrient utilization from carbohydrates to fats and proteins, vitamins, minerals and electrolytes
  4. Homo sapiens food procurement from hunter-gathering, agriculture and animal domestication
  5. food and culture which examines the sociocultural factors that may have contributed to the practice of cannibalism, the ecological basis for the preference and food taboos in contemporary populations, the biological basis for the variability in the ability to digest milk, accommodation to dietary restriction throughout the life cycle, and the consequence of human endeavor to increase its food supply and decrease energy expenditure on the increased prevalence of obesity that is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the industrialized world.

NOTE: All students are expected to know about the principles on which techniques of assessing body composition and nutritional status are based. Such knowledge will be tested on the exam. One option is to learn these techniques by having one's own body size and composition measured by another student, and to measure another student's body size and composition. Students may also choose the option of measuring the weight and fat percentage of their GSI, if their GSI agrees. Students who do not wish to have their body size and composition measured and/or who do not wish to perform such measurements on others will be excused from the assignment. Those who do not participate in these measurements will lose no points as a result. Instead, such students will be given written exercises addressed at interpreting these anthropometric measurements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 365. Human Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. High school biology is assumed. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrbio/365/001.nsf

Human evolution has been a biological process with both social and physical aspects. Through lectures, discussion section, laboratory, and reading, the interrelated process of behavioral and physical change is outlined for humans and their ancestors. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary mechanisms, and context is provided through an understanding of the pre-human primates. The human story begins with origins and the appearance of unique human features such as bipedality, the loss of cutting canines, the appearance of continual sexual receptivity, births requiring midwifery, and the development of complex social interactions. An early adaptive shift sets the stage for the subsequent evolution of intelligence, technology, and the changes in physical form that are the consequence of the unique feedback system involving cultural and biological change. The "Eve" theory and other ideas about the origin of modern humanity and human races, and their development and relationships, are discussed in this context. Class participation and discussion are emphasized, and there is a required discussion/laboratory section for elaboration of lecture topics and supervised hands-on experience with primate skeletal material and replicas of human fossils. Student evaluations are based on two examinations, laboratory quizzes, and a laboratory exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRBIO 399. Honors in Biological Anthropology and Anthropology/Zoology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit twice.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seniors who choose to enter the honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior honors program should consult with the departmental honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the College Honors Program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior honors program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 451. Molecular Anthropology Lab.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Andrew Merriwether (andym@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. Anthro. 450 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~andym/451.html

This is a laboratory course where students will learn and employ some of the basic methodologies for collecting molecular genetic data. Methods include DNA extraction, PCR, electrophoresis, RFLP analyses, analysis of STR polymorphisms, and DNA sequencing. Class projects will include the collection and analysis of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 467. Human Behavioral Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A strong background in the natural sciences is assumed, including any two of the following courses: Anthropology 161, 368; Biol. 162, 404, 494. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/anthrbio/467/001.nsf

This course considers the anthropological significance of recent advances in natural selection theory. Particular topics include: cooperation, reciprocity, inclusive fitness, sexual selection, mating systems, and parental investment. Students will read the primary scientific literature to learn how anthropologists test evolutionary hypotheses in varied geographic and cultural contexts (for example, Ache hunter-gatherers of Paraguay, Dogon agriculturalists of Mali, Kipsigi pastoralists of Kenya, 19th-century Europeans, and contemporary North Americans). Natural selection theory will also be used to probe the field of human reproductive ecology, with emphasis on the demographic transition, historical demography, the evolution of menstruation, and female fecundity. In addition to exams, students will write a term paper in which they hone their ability to discriminate among alternative view points using both qualitative and quantitative data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Andrew Merriwether (andym@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the course number to take directed laboratory study or computer analytical study with Dr. Merriwether. Entry is by intructors permission. Email your full name, student number, Anth 471 sec 006, (and choose from 1-3 credits) to andym@umich.edu and Dr. Merriwether will forward approval for you to CRISP into the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 562. Human Nature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. Anthro. 467 and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics include: human social relationships, morality, religion, and the emotions. Students will read provocative books such as, Robert Wright's The Moral Animal (or other books of current interest), as well as original scientific articles. Students will be encouraged to discuss the subject matter in relation to their own experiences. This is a fast paced course intended for students who are simultaneously enrolled in Human Behavioral Ecology (Anthro. 467) or who have taken Anthro. 467 in a previous term. Other courses on evolution and behavior may be substituted for 467 with permission of the instructor. Grading will be based on class participation and an in-depth research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRBIO.


Page Counter


This page was created at 5:13 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.