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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Communication Studies


This page was created at 5:18 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Communication Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMM

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Communication Studies.


COMM 101. The Mass Media.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan J Douglas (sdoug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/101/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide an introductory overview of contemporary mass media systems and an examination of the various factors historical, economic, political, and cultural that have shaped their development. The course begins with a description of present print and electronic media and examines their evolution. Attention is given throughout to the legal and ethical implications of mass communication systems and to comparisons between American media systems and those elsewhere in the world. Finally, it considers the probable future course of the media and examines possible alternatives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 102. Media Processes and Effects.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/102/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the contemporary research on mass communication processes and effects. Basic processes involved in the production, dissemination, reception, and impact of media messages are examined. The course investigates a variety of effects on individuals' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as influences on the functioning of larger social systems. It proceeds in general from investigations of individual-level to societal-level impact. Critical reading and evaluation of research on media processes and effects, and of its application to social policy debates, is encouraged and developed.

Text: Harris, R.J. (1999). A Cognitive Psychology of Mass Communication Third Edition. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah: NJ. Available from the Michigan Union Bookstore, Michigan Book and Supply, and Ulrich's Bookstore. Also on reserve on the second floor of the Shapiro Undergraduate Library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 111. Workshop on Managing the Information Environment.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, database searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 159. First-Year Seminar in Communication Studies.

Section 001 Introduction to Journalistic Performance.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in Communication Studies.

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar introduces first-year students to the basics of journalistic performance. The seminar will examine how journalists operate and discuss their role in society. Students will review the history and evolution of Western journalistic values, with special focus on the concept of "objectivity." The seminar will examine the application of those values to global news coverage. In conclusion, students will consider ethical issues involving journalists' obligations to their profession and to society.

Texts:

  1. David T. Z. Mindich, Just the Facts: How Objectivity Came to Define American Journalism, (New York: New York University Press, 1998).
  2. Wm. A. Hachten, The World News Prism: Changing Media of International Communication (Ames, Iowa: Iowa State U. Press, fifth edition, 1999, paperback)
  3. Everette E. Dennis and John C. Merrill, Media Debates: Issues in Mass Communication (White Plains, N.Y.: Longman Publishers, 1996).
  4. James Fallows, Breaking the News (New York: Vintage Books, 1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 211. Evaluating Information.

Instructor(s): Michael Traugott (mtrau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 111. (4). (SS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches the fundamental thinking skills necessary for critical evaluation of research-based arguments, especially those based on quantitative information. Such skills are required for one to be a competent mass communicator of information, a critical consumer of information relayed by the mass media, or an intelligent scholar of media processes and effects.

The course introduces generic logical and statistical concepts through analysis and discussion of specific cases drawn from research reported in the mass media (e.g., health and business news, public opinion polls), research on the media, (e.g., the impact of media violence), and research for the media (e.g., audience research). Students' logical and quantitative reasoning skills are improved through a variety of "hands-on" exercises and projects (many involving computerized spreadsheet programs). The course is introductory in nature, and no prior statistical expertise is required.

READINGS: The Course Calendar provided in this syllabus lists readings to be completed in preparation for each meeting of lectures and workshops. Required readings should be done in the order listed whenever possible. Two textbooks have been ordered for the course:

  • Katzer, J, Cook, K. H., & Crouch, W. (1997). Evaluating Information: A Guide for Users of Social Science Research, 4th edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Lavrakas, P. and M. W. Traugott. (1999). The Voter's Guide to Election Polls, 2nd edition. Chatham NJ: Chatham House.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 311. Mass Communication Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 211. (3). (SS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a guided introduction to mass communication research processes. The course will address methods of framing media research, techniques for gathering empirical data in an effort to answer these questions, and statistical and other techniques for organizing, analyzing and interpreting the data to form valid conclusions. Students collaborate in carrying out a term research project, which provides the opportunity to practice the many techniques learned in the course. The aim is to enable students to pursue their own ideas, from initial conceptualization and development of the research questions to final conclusions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 321. Undergraduate Internship.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, concentration in communication studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. No more than six credits combined of Comm. Studies 321 and 322 may be elected.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/comm/Internships/cs321info.htm

Communication Studies concentrators who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Student assessment will be based on the academic merit of the work and evaluation of the final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 351. Structure and Function of Media Systems.

Section 002 only satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Zhaoxu Yan (zyan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/351/001.nsf

This course examines research and scholarship focused on existing media institutions, their genesis and current lines of development, institutional arrangements, organization and operation, economic structure, and characteristic communications "output." Course topics may include: the history of media systems; media and government, including legal, regulatory, and free-expression issues; media economics; international media systems; technologies; media organizational routines; and the values and behavior of media professionals. The course investigates the ways in which institutional, economic, and organizational arrangements affect professional behavior and media content, with attention to media system changes over time and in comparative contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 361. Processes of Mediated Communication.

Section 002 only satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/361/001.nsf

This course examines general phenomena involved with the creation, dissemination, and reception of mediated information. Course topics may include: information processing, including message encoding and decoding; media priming and framing of evaluations and decisions; influences of message structure and communication modalities on processing; media use and reception, including interpretive processes; information flow and control, focusing on influences of communication networks, message diffusion, and information gatekeeping; and communicative processes of learning, persuasion, and social influence. The emphasis is on the development and testing of general theories explaining how mediated communication works, even though research examined will center on particular cases (e.g., studies of priming in political communication).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 371. Media, Culture, and Society.

Section 002 only satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Bambi Haggins (bhaggins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the rise of the mass media and social and cultural issues surrounding the history of the mass media in the United States. Course topics studied may include: communication and social identity, including race, ethnicity, and gender; media's role in defining and representing culture; issues of pluralism and post-colonialism, media audiences as interpretive and "imagined" communities; media and social movements; and the role of media in altering and maintaining political and social order. Research on mass communication is examined in connection with broader questions about the relations between cultural systems and social formations, and about the dynamics of social and cultural change and contestation.

Required Texts: (available for purchase at Shaman Drum. The texts are also available on reserve):

  • Douglas, Susan. Where the Girls Are.
  • Frank, Thomas. The Conquest of Cool.
  • Kasson, John F. Amusing the Million.
  • Roeder, George. The Censored War.
  • Rosen, Jeffrey. The Unwanted Gaze.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 381. Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior.

Section 002 only satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Kristen S Harrison (krishar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 101 or 102 strongly recommended. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/381/001.nsf

This course critically evaluates research and scholarship on the impact of mass communication, especially television, in a variety of substantive domains. Media impact is treated both in theoretical and applied terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: social values; educational development; political behavior; violence and aggressive behavior; consumer behavior; health, emotion, and mood; and children. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 001 Supreme Court News Coverage. (3 Credits). Meets with Comm 439.002.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 439.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 002 Supreme Court News Coverage. (3 Credits). Meets with Comm 439.001.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 003 The Rule of Law In Journalism. Meets with Communication 439.004.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/439/003.nsf

See Communication Studies 439.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 004 The Rule of Law In Journalism. Meets with Communication 439.003.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/439/003.nsf

This course will study the intersection of journalism and the rule of law. Students will be introduced to the history and evolution of the First Amendment, government attempts to curtail free speech during times of political crisis, and the ground breaking advances for press freedom under New York Times vs. Sullivan and other seminal cases. The course will allow students to develop a philosophy about the role of a journalist who works in a democracy and with the benefits of the rule of law; understand that laws govern the craft of journalism and give rise to tensions; and gain an appreciation for legal journalism that tells human stories and critically analyzes the media.

Mr. Ghannam's research and professional interests include the intersection of journalism and the rule of law, international and legal affairs reporting. His work has most recently appeared in The Boston Globe. He is a consultant to the Washington, DC-based International Center for Journalists, which conducts training in 70 countries to promote independent journalism. He spent nearly 10 years as a staff writer at the Detroit Free Press where his duties included serving as an assistant Nation/World and Metro editor. He has also reported for the American Bar Association Journal, Time magazine, the New York Times and United Press International.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for original, individualized student research under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with the faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 453. The Media in U.S. History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret T Wheeler (mtwheel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the history of mass media in the United States, covering print, film, broadcast, and digital media. It examines different models of media development, exploring the relationship between technological, political, and cultural change. By surveying US media history in light of these models, it provides students with the historical grounding to better understand changes currently occurring in communications media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 001 History of the African American Press. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 486.001.

Instructor(s): Catherine A Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~squiresc/pressyll.htm

See CAAS 486.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 002 Ethics Issues In Journalism. Meets with Comm 458.003.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 458.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 003 Ethics Issues In Journalism. Meets with Comm 458.002.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on problems in journalistic ethics at a time of growing concern over standards of news coverage, as exemplified most recently in the Lewinsky case. The course provides an historic overview of traditional journalistic ethics. Coupled with that is a detailed study of changing values in news coverage as media decision makers adapt to social, economic and technological changes. The course highlights such problems as sensationalism, infotainment, anonymous sources, hidden cameras, punditry, the lowering of the wall of separation between the business and editorial sides of news organizations, invasions of privacy, and the personal behavior of journalists. The course studies journalists' responsibilities to their profession and to the public, and examines proposed solutions to the problems of ethics violations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 004 Reporting On War. Meets with Comm 458.005.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/458/004.nsf

This course will examine how the attacks on the United States and the war on terrorism were reported differently, or in lock step, by various media. Special emphasis will be placed on First Amendment law, the role of the independent journalist, journalism ethics, government attempts at censorship, and media self-censorship in contrast to the Vietnam experience. Students will weigh journalistic duty against national security, classified information, and increased government surveillance and its impact on public information. This course will also consider the impact of Al-Jazeera satellite TV and the conflicts confronting publicly-traded media companies that must strive for mass appeal, profits, truth, and accuracy.

Mr. Ghannam's research and professional interests include the intersection of journalism and the rule of law, international and legal affairs reporting. His work has most recently appeared in The Boston Globe. He is a consultant to the Washington, DC-based International Center for Journalists, which conducts training in 70 countries to promote independent journalism. He spent nearly 10 years as a staff writer at the Detroit Free Press where his duties included serving as an assistant Nation/World and Metro editor. He has also reported for the American Bar Association Journal, Time magazine, the New York Times and United Press International.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 005 Reporting On War. Meets with Comm 458.004.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/458/004.nsf

This course will examine how the attacks on the United States and the war on terrorism were reported differently, or in lock step, by various media. Special emphasis will be placed on First Amendment law, the role of the independent journalist, journalism ethics, government attempts at censorship, and media self-censorship in contrast to the Vietnam experience. Students will weigh journalistic duty against national security, classified information, and increased government surveillance and its impact on public information. This course will also consider the impact of Al-Jazeera satellite TV and the conflicts confronting publicly-traded media companies that must strive for mass appeal, profits, truth, and accuracy.

Mr. Ghannam's research and professional interests include the intersection of journalism and the rule of law, international and legal affairs reporting. His work has most recently appeared in The Boston Globe. He is a consultant to the Washington, DC-based International Center for Journalists, which conducts training in 70 countries to promote independent journalism. He spent nearly 10 years as a staff writer at the Detroit Free Press where his duties included serving as an assistant Nation/World and Metro editor. He has also reported for the American Bar Association Journal, Time magazine, the New York Times and United Press International.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 459. Seminar in Media Systems.

Section 001 Media and Narrative: Reading the Structure and Impact of Media in Narrative.

Instructor(s): Margaret T Wheeler (mtwheel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the relationship between media and the stories that get told in them. While it does not accept the claim that "the medium is the message" uncritically, it recognizes that the structure of a medium affects how stories can be told in that medium. At the same time, the stories that get told in a particular medium can say quite a bit about the larger social structures that support that medium. This course explores the relationship between media and narrative by pairing critical texts with self-referential narratives in a series of media: oral, book, newspaper, movie, and television.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 468. Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes.

Section 001 Designing Persuasive Communication. Meets with Art 407, Marketing 407

Instructor(s): Douglas H Hesseltine (hesselti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Part of a sponsored project on persuasive communication, this interdisciplinary seminar investigates the changes in business, technology, and design that are reshaping the words and images, the form and content of persuasive mass communication. Its aim is to provide students with skills critical to an understanding of both the business and techniques of persuasion. This seminar examines how media content producers design and pitch messages. It challenges participants to use critical methods to evaluate media products and to examine current cultural and economic transformations. It investigates emerging strategies for reaching global and regional audiences, discusses the impact of new technologies and media convergence, and examines the social and ethical issues that underlie persuasive strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 478. Special Topics in Media and Culture.

Section 001 Cultural History of Radio.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Battles (kbattles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/478/001.nsf

It is the goal of this course to develop a critical cultural perspective on the history of radio, examining radio programming and its connections to the broader culture. The course begins with an exploration of the beginnings of popular radio in the 1920s and ends with a discussion of its current state. Considerable time is spent considering radio's "golden age" during the 1930s and 40s when it was the dominant popular culture medium. Course readings focus on secondary, scholarly books and articles, but will occasionally include primary texts. In addition, students will be required to complete weekly reading responses, a short analysis essay, and a final research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 484 / POLSCI 420. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. The interaction between the press, politicians, and the public during political campaigns receives detailed attention. Topics include: how news is made; campaign strategies; political advertising effects; relations between Congress, the President, and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 485 / SOC 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001 Meets with Comm 485.002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 485.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 485 / SOC 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 002 Meets with Comm 485.001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores enduring research questions concerning mass communication and public opinion. Important normative and conceptual issues (e.g., the role of the press in a democratic society; the susceptibility of citizens to media influence; the differentiation of mass, crowd, and public; the relationship of attitudes to opinions) are first identified and examined by reviewing writings in social philosophy and social science. These issues are then investigated further through a review of relevant research in sociology, political science, social psychology, and mass communication. Emphasis is given to recent research dealing with the impact of the media on public opinion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 488. Special Topics in Media Effects.

Section 001 Propaganda. Meets with Comm 488.002.

Instructor(s): Richard L Allen (yebo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/488/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 488.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 488. Special Topics in Media Effects.

Section 002 Propaganda. Meets with Comm 488.001.

Instructor(s): Richard L Allen (yebo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/488/001.nsf

This course examines propaganda from the perspective of different academic disciplines, with a major emphasis placed on work from the broad field of communication. Although the subject of propaganda is vast and the literature is extensive, our approach entails a systematic survey of its history and an investigation of its contemporary significance. With the appearance of a wide variety of new communications technologies and the ever-present promise of additional channels for disseminating information, the opportunities for heightened propaganda activities become more pronounced. Many scholars have noted this fact and various predictions have been made concerning its societal impact. We will evaluate these predictions and also offer our own. The goal of the course is to provide a challenge to the participants to become involved in the intriguing world of propaganda. The hope is that it would stimulate further research and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 488. Special Topics in Media Effects.

Section 003 Media and the Body. Meets with Women's Studies 483.005.

Instructor(s): Kristen S Harrison (krishar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/comm/488/003.nsf

This course explores the way the human body is portrayed within, and affected by, the mass media. The term "body" is broadly construed to apply to a wide range of corporeal issues that have been linked to identity, such as ability and disability, race, age, sexuality, social class, athletic prowess, and health. How the body is adorned, how the body is shaped, the age of the body and its skin color, whether the body is portrayed as active or passive, free or restrained, are all questions central to understanding what the media say about human beings and their identities through portrayals of human bodies. The gendered nature of the media-portrayed body will be explored as a common thread throughout these topics. In addition, the effects of media portrayals on the bodies of audience members will be explored, especially effects on arousal and emotion, behavior and health.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 492. Senior Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s): L Rowell Huesmann (huesmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 491. (3). (Excl). No more than three credits of Comm. Studies 491-492 may be included in a communication studies concentration plan. (INDEPENDENT).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second in a two-part honors seminar program and culminates in the composition of a senior honors thesis. Students must have successfully completed Comm 491. This course is offered only in winter term and meets only on occasion, based on a schedule to be arranged at the first class session. Students work directly with their thesis advisers, and are expected to meet regularly with them for direction and assistance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 502. Marsh Professor Mini-Course.

Section 001 Media and Government. Meets Mar. 11 - Mar. 21.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


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