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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Geological Sciences


This page was created at 5:21 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Geological Sciences
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GEOSCI

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Geological Sciences.


Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

G.S. 100-115 are short (half-term) courses. They consist of detailed examinations of restricted geologic topics. The department lists the specific courses from this series in the Time Schedule for the terms they are offered (fall and winter terms only). Each course, when offered, meets twice weekly for half of the term (first half or second half), and the specific dates for each course are printed in the Time Schedule. These courses are designed primarily for students with no prior geologic training and they are open to all interested persons. G.S. 100-115 are offered on the graded pattern (optional pass/fail).


GEOSCI 100. Coral Reefs.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS JAN 8 TO FEB 21. FINAL EXAM ON FEB 21 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Philip A Meyers (pameyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 156. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Coral Reefs will be an in-depth tour of the biological and physical processes active in modern reef systems to provide a detailed understanding of the ecology of the individual organisms and the complex nature of their interactions within the reef community. Evolution of the reef community will be examined, ranging from the crude framework structures formed over one billion years ago by primitive algae to the luxuriant and diversified reefs of the modern-day oceans, to define the evolutionary strategies of reef building organisms. By tracking these evolutionary strategies through geologic time, the implications of man's intervention with the Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere on the character of future reef communities will be considered.

REQUIRED TEXT: Course Pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 100. Coral Reefs.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 002 MEETS MAR 5 TO APR 16. FINAL EXAM ON APR 16 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Kyger C Lohmann (kacey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 156. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~kacey/ugrad/courses.html

Coral Reefs will be an in-depth tour of the biological and physical processes active in modern reef systems to provide a detailed understanding of the ecology of the individual organisms and the complex nature of their interactions within the reef community. Evolution of the reef community will be examined, ranging from the crude framework structures formed over one billion years ago by primitive algae to the luxuriant and diversified reefs of the modern-day oceans, to define the evolutionary strategies of reef building organisms. By tracking these evolutionary strategies through geologic time, the implications of man's intervention with the Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere on the character of future reef communities will be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 103. Dinosaurs and Other Failures.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS MAR 5 TO APR 16. FINAL EXAM ON APR 16 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey A Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 149. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to our current understanding of dinosaurs and certain other reptilian groups of the Mesozoic Era. It is intended for students with an interest in geology, paleontology, or evolution, but does not require prior training in these fields. The course will deal with broad features of the evolutionary history of dinosaurs, methods of reconstructing dinosaur behavior and ecology, new developments in our interpretation of the biology of dinosaurs, and possible causes for the extinction of dinosaurs. There will be two lectures each week and a single exam at the end of the course.

REQUIRED TEXT: Course Pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 105. Continents Adrift.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS FROM JAN 8 TO FEB 21 WITH FINAL EXAM ON FEB 21 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Josep M Pares (jmpares@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205 or 146. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This one-credit course will explore the mobility of the continents and oceans in geological times. Conceptual and factual material will be combined with the principles of plate tectonics and the processes that drive the plates. No special background is recommended, and evaluation will be based on a final exam (with a practice take-home exam mid-way). The goals of this minicourse are to familiarize students with one of the more exciting recent developments in earth sciences, a unifying concept that explains ocean evolution, mountain building, earthquakes, and volcanoes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 107. Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS JAN 8 TO FEB 21. FINAL EXAM ON FEB 21 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Larry John Ruff (ruff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205, 146, or 147. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~ruff/geo107.W2002/geo107.W2002.html

This one-credit course is a study of the earth in action and includes the following topics: geography of earthquakes and volcanoes; catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism; volcanic rocks; volcanic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans; relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the Earth; volcanism and geothermal energy; manmade earthquakes; and earthquake prediction and control. Instruction by lecture; evaluation on basis of quizzes and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 107. Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 002 MEETS MAR 5 TO APR 16. FINAL EXAM ON APR 16 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=MARCH 11).

Instructor(s): Rebecca Ann Lange (becky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205, 146, or 147. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~becky/

This one-credit course is a study of the earth in action and includes the following topics: geography of earthquakes and volcanoes; catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism; volcanic rocks; volcanic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; volcanism and geothermal energy; manmade earthquakes; and earthquake prediction and control. Instruction by lecture; evaluation on basis of quizzes and a final exam.

Required Text: Encyclopedia of Earthquakes and Volcanoes, by Ritchie and Gates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 109. Water and Society.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS MAR 5 TO APR 16. FINAL EXAM ON APR 16 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Maria C Castro (mccastro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 206. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will present an overview of problems encountered through the unwise use of water resources and the resultant impact on society through the analysis of case studies. An introduction to the hydrological cycle and principles of surface and groundwater hydrology will be provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

GEOSCI 113. Planets and Moons.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS JAN 8 TO FEB 21. FINAL EXAM ON FEB 21 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Peter van Keken (keken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 204 or 153. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course provides a current survey of the geology and climates of the various bodies of the solar system in light of the extraordinary advances in planetary exploration during the past two decades. Topics treated include historical development of geological ideas about the solar system, planetary evolution, variability of geological processes throughout the solar system, and individual portraits of the principal members of the solar system family. No previous geological background is required. Course grade will be determined from a single objective-type final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 114. The Elements.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS MAR 5 TO APR 16 . FINAL EXAM ON APR 16 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Youxue Zhang (youxue@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High School math, physics, and chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 142. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~youxue/GS114.html

This lecture course introduces the origin, abundance, and distribution of the elements in the solar system. It is intended for students with an interest in science. The topics include: a review of the periodic table of the elements; stellar evolution and synthesis of the elements; nuclear properties and their relation to the abundance of the elements and their isotopes; and chemical properties and their relation to the distribution of the elements in planets and in different reservoirs of a planet. Great pictures of the planets; formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Evaluation on the basis of a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXT: The Elements, by Cox.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GEOSCI 115. Geologic Time.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 MEETS JAN 8 TO FEB 21. FINAL EXAM ON FEB 21 OR ARRANGED. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Eric J Essene (essene@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 135 or 145. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Until the middle of the 18th century the Earth was generally thought to be less than 10,000 years old, and according to many, close to its apocalyptic end. We now know that the Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago and that the entire history of mankind is nothing but the latest tiny fraction of Earth history. The formation of rocks, continental drift, volcanoes, and earthquakes is evaluated in the framework of geologic time and plate tectonics. The discovery of time from the Renaissance to the latest high tech developments in radioactive dating is reviewed. Finally, the history of planet Earth will be described including its accretion out of dust and giant impacts, the origin of the Moon, the formation of the atmosphere and oceans, the development of life, and the building of continents. The course will draw upon examples meaningful to the student to illustrate the principles. Lectures twice weekly for half the term. A final one hour examination.

REQUIRED TEXT: A Short History of Planet Earth, by MacDougall. In paperback.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 117. Introduction to Geology.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rob van der Voo (voo@umich.edu) , Josep M Pares (jmpares@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 116, 119, or 120. Those with credit for GS 205 may only elect GS 117 for 4 credits. (5). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to Geology is a single term course structured to provide students from all backgrounds with an understanding of the history of Earth and of the natural processes which have given rise to its landscapes, oceans, and continents. This includes examination of: the physical processes which give rise to plate tectonics and the formation of earthquakes, volcanoes, and the uplift of major mountain ranges; and the chemical and biological phenomena which modify the character of the atmosphere-hydrosphere-biosphere at the Earth's surface. This course includes a laboratory to provide hands-on experience in identifying common rocks and minerals and in understanding geological and topographical maps. The course includes lectures and weekly laboratory and discussion sections. Topics covered in class lecture are reviewed weekly in a one hour discussion section.

REQUIRED TEXT: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 118. Introductory Geology Laboratory.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GS 119, or 205 and 206, or 135. Credit is not granted for GS 118 to those with credit for an introductory course in geology (GS 116, 117, or 218). (1). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 119. Introductory Geology Lectures.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rob van der Voo (voo@umich.edu) , Josep M Pares (jmpares@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 116, 117, 120. No credit granted to those who have completed both 205 and 206. Those with credit for GS 205 may only elect GS 119 for 3 credits. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of lectures shared with Geology 117 but does not include the laboratory section. A separate discussion section is also scheduled to insure continuity with class material and student-teacher contact. Students interested in a ONE-TERM laboratory introductory science course should elect Geology 117. Lectures and discussion.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 120. Geology of National Parks and Monuments.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce H Wilkinson (eustasy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is not granted for GS 120 to those with credit for an introductory course in geology (GS 116, 117, 119). No credit granted to those who have completed both GS 205 and 206. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eustasy/GS120.html

This course approaches Earth history by examining the geology of places rather than by taking a process approach. It is designed for all interested undergraduates at the University of Michigan. The course format consists of three lectures each week and one two-hour demonstration-laboratory period, for four credits. Lecture material deals with the geologic history of selected national parks and monuments, which are chosen and scheduled so that those in which the oldest rocks are exposed (thus relating to the earliest portions of Earth history) are covered first. In so doing, we cover Earth history in a temporal progression, but do so by discussing different geographic areas. The demonstration-laboratory portion of the course will give you first-hand experience with rocks, minerals, and fossils; and an opportunity to discuss these in small groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 142. From Stars to Stones.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Youxue Zhang (youxue@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school math and science. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All other students need permission of instructor. Those with credit for GS 114 may only elect GS 142 for 2 credits. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~youxue/GS266.html

This course starts with stellar evolution and the formation of the elements in stars, and ends at the formation of terrestrial planets (especially our Earth) from these elements and the early evolution of these planets. Students will learn cosmochemical and geochemical concepts and methods, and apply them to study several theme topics. The theme topics may include: origin of the elements, lifetime of the sun, abundance of the elements, age of the Earth and solar system, origin of the Earth, internal structure of the Earth, planetary atmospheres, and meteorites. Though factual knowledge is an important part of the course, emphasis is on how scientists study and solve problems and how science progresses using historical examples. (Quantitative reasoning will be an important part of the course.)

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: From Stone to Star, by C. Allegre (1992) and The Elements, by Cox.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 145. Evolution of the Earth.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel B Mukasa (mukasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 135. Those with credit for GS 115 may only elect GS 145 for 2 credits. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar course is intended for first-year students with no previous knowledge of, or experience in, the earth sciences. The material will introduce students to the history of the Earth from its formation in the solar nebula, through the development of the continents, oceans, atmosphere, and life to its present state as an active planet. The course will explain how various features of the earth "work," including continental drift, volcanoes, and the formation of most rocks; how theories are developed in geology; and how the magnitude of time has been determined. The course will be divided into two halves. In the first half, the basic concepts will be explained. In the second half, students will each make a presentation covering a relevant subject which will be followed by discussion. Assessment will be by two one-hour examinations and an oral presentation that will form the basis for a term paper. Regular assigned readings from the course text book are essential.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Then and Now by Montgomery, (1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GEOSCI 150. Dinosaur Extinction and Other Controversies.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter D Wilf (pwilf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pwilf/gs150/gs150.html

One of the most dramatic developments in the sciences is the suggestion that a meteorite impact caused the extinction of the dinosaurs. This controversial idea is one of many that we will address in this course, which will deal broadly with the evolution and extinction of life on Earth. After an overview of the history of life, we will examine high-profile debates on whether major evolutionary events and mass extinctions occur gradually or catastrophically, whether dinosaurs are really extinct, and other topics.

Requirements: Reading, class participation, written assignments, midterm, and final exams.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: Prehistoric Journey: A History of Life on Earth, by Johnson & Stucky (1995); Extinction: Bad Genes or Bad Luck?, by Raup (1992); and Night Comes to the Cretaceous: Comets, Craters, Controversy, and the Last Days of the Dinosaurs, by Powell (1999).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

GEOSCI 153. Earthlike Planets.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter van Keken (keken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school science and math recommended. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All other students need permission of instructor. Those with credit for GS 113 may only elect GS 153 for 2 credits. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This first-year seminar introduces, in a small classroom setting, the terrestrial planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Physical and chemical studies of the solid planets allow for a better understanding of the evolution and future of our own world. This course combines an historical perspective with modern scientific approaches, augmented by the wealth of very recent planetary studies. The course grade is based on class participation, two exams, and a final project, which consists of a written report and an oral presentation.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Planetary System, 2nd ed. by Morrison & Owen.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 201 / GEOG 201. Introductory Geography: Water, Climate, and Mankind.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carola H Stearns (cstearns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 144. Those with credit for GS 111 may only elect GS 201 for 3 credits. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a basic introduction to physical geography which emphasizes many topics including maps, seasons, the atmosphere, greenhouse gasses, radiation and heat balance, the dangers of global warming, circulation, moisture and precipitation, air masses, and water supply. Students also study climate classification, geologic and historical climate changes, and landforms and their formation. Students in this lecture-lab course are evaluated by hourly and final examinations with satisfactory completion of the lab work a prerequisite to the final course evaluation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 222. Introductory Oceanography.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip A Meyers (pameyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the oceans. Contents include the shape, structure, and origin of the ocean basins; the sedimentary record of oceanic life and conditions in the past; the composition of seawater and its influence on life and climate; waves and currents; the life of the oceans and how it depends upon the marine environment; and the resources of the ocean and their wise use by society. The course format consists of lectures and readings from an assigned textbook. The course grade will be based on three one-hour exams and a two-hour final exam.

REQUIRED TEXT: Introduction to the World's Oceans, by Duxbury.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 223. Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in GS 222. (1). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an optional laboratory intended to provide students with opportunities to explore further various oceanography topics presented in the GEOSCI 222 lectures. Laboratory sessions will include sampling procedures, use of equipment, discussions, and demonstrations of how data are generated. The course grade will be based on written laboratory exercises and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXT: Course Pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 232. Earth Materials.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lars P Stixrude (stixrude@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem 125/130 or 210/211. Those with credit for GS 231 may elect GS 232 for only 2 credits. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~stixrude/GS232/index.html

This course is a required part of the Environmental Geology concentration program. It comprises an introduction to the inorganic materials that occur near the earth's surface and their role in environmental processes. The course consists of:

  • an introduction to matter and review of the elements and the structure of the atoms;
  • the nature of gases and molecules in the earth's atmosphere and their role in precipitation, sunlight filtration, and other processes;
  • geological fluids and the hydrosphere;
  • solid earth materials including minerals, their systematics, relationships between structure, bonding and behavior, and their combination in composites (rocks); and
  • processes and concepts such as diagenesis, the evolution of soils, and global geochemical cycles, in which all geospheres participate in essential ways.

In our study of the materials science of nature, we will explore such questions as: How do the physical and chemical nature of earth materials govern our environment? How do bonding and structure determine the properties of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, solid earth, and biosphere? How do transformation and change of earth materials mediate interactions among geospheres? Laboratory will explore the properties and characteristics of gaseous, fluid, and solid earth materials. There will be a midterm, final exam, and a term paper.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Manual of Mineralogy, 22nd edition, by Klein (2001).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 310. Petrology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Ann Lange (becky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GS 231 and either an introductory geological sciences course or GS 351 to be elected prior to or concurrently with GS 310. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Petrology is the study of the origins of rocks. Emphasis is placed on igneous and metamorphic rocks in this course. The evidence for the deep crustal and upper mantle sources of igneous rocks is traced using petrographic, geochemical, and phase diagrammatic observations. In metamorphic petrology the response of metamorphites to changes in pressure, temperature, and fluid composition will be evaluated, primarily using petrographic and phase equilibrium data. Plate tectonic processes will be tied in to the origin and evolution of many igneous and metamorphic rocks. Some comparisons with extra-terrestrial igneous petrology will be made. The lectures are coordinated with microscopic laboratories using optical techniques to identify and evaluate mineral assemblages. The grade is determined through a combination of midterms, laboratory exams, and a final.

REQUIRED TEXT: Origins of Igneous Rocks, by Hess and Introduction to Metamorphic Petrology, by Yardley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 351. Structural Geology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001 Introductory Earth Structure. Meets with Geology 451.001.

Instructor(s): Ben van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GS 117 or 119. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~vdpluijm/gs351.htm

This course includes the description and analysis of geological structures in the Earth's crust and an introduction to global tectonics. There wil be three lectures and one laboratory session weekly. The following topics are covered: the description of geological structures; the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting; stress, strain, deformation and rheology; introduction to dislocation theory; micro-structural analysis; principles of plate tectonics; and selected orogenic systems of the world. This is a core course for concentrators, but is open to all who want to have a basic knowledge of geology. Evaluation is based on graded lab assignments, a lab test, and three exams.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: Earth Structure An Introduction to Structural Geology and Tectonics, by B. A. van der Pluijm and S. Marshak, (1997) and Structural Analysis and Synthesis, (2nd ed), by Rowland & Duebendorfer.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 418. Paleontology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel C Fisher (dcfisher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GS 117 or Biol. 162. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods of analysis, and major controversies within paleontology. It will familiarize the student with the fossil record (primarily, but not exclusively, of multicellular organisms) and its use in dealing with problems in evolutionary biology, paleoecology, and general Earth history. Three lectures weekly; midterm, final examination, and term paper.

Required text: Prothero, Bringing Fossils to Life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 419. Paleontology Laboratory.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel C Fisher (dcfisher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GS 418. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introductory laboratory in paleontology. It will involve observation, analysis, and interpretation of fossil specimens (primarily invertebrates) and relevant material of living organisms. Its goal is to give the student experience in dealing with paleontological problems and to develop a familiarity with the systematics and morphology of important groups of fossil organisms. Students should be registered concurrently or previously in GEOSCI 418. One three-hour lab weekly; lab exercises, midterm, and final examination.

Required text: Prothero, Bringing Fossils to Life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 425. Environmental Geochemistry.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip A Meyers (pameyers@umich.edu) , Stephen Kesler (skesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with geochemistry as it relates to humans and their geologic environment. The intended audience for the course includes advanced undergraduates and graduate students in Geological Sciences, as well as students at a similar level in related divisions such as Chemistry, Natural Resources, Public Health, and Engineering. The course reviews the composition of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere and the ways that they are related to the composition of the biosphere. Special attention is given to naturally-occurring elements and compounds of environmental interest and to geochemical processes of environmental significance. Lecture material is supplemented by problem sets and discussions. Evaluation is based on these assignments, as well as a midterm and a final exam. Reading comes largely from a course pack, class handouts, and research papers.

REQUIRED TEXT: Course Pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 427. Environmental and Technological Applications of Mineralogy.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001 Envir proc/Nucl Waste Dispos. Meets with NERS 590.001.

Instructor(s): Rodney C Ewing (rodewing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GS 231/232, comparable courses in the solid-state, or the approval of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to attract those students with an interest and background in solid-state sciences. The emphasis will be on the combination of fundamental principles with application to environmental and technological problems.

Major topics include:

  • Fundamental Principles:
    • Classification and description of structure types
    • Interpretation of crystal structures
    • Phase transitions
    • Trace elements
    • Mineral surfaces
    • Amorphous solids
  • Review of selected analytical techniques

  • Application (examples of selected topics):
    • Clays: Structure, sorption, and retardation
    • Soils: Near-surface geochemistry
    • Cement: Degradation processes
    • Zeolites: Ion exchange and molecular sieves
    • Actinides (U, Th, Pu, and Np)
    • Toxic metals (Pb, Se, Te, Hg)
    • Design and testing of waste forms for high level nuclear waste
    • Design of opto-electronic devices: Strain across boundaries
    • Acid mine tailings
    • Hazardous mineral dusts: silica and asbestos
    • Colloids
  • Science applied to society:
    • Epidemiological studies as a research tool in mineralogy
    • The analysis of risk

Upper-level undergraduates and first year graduate students in Geological Sciences, Materials Science, and Engineering. Lecture. The lecture will be supplemented by readings from current scientific journals. Grades will be based on homework assignments, a term paper, and an oral presentation of the paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 436. Field Studies in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, and Sedimentology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


GEOSCI 437. Evolution of Vertebrates.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey A Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in general biology or historical geology. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides students with a detailed interaction with the facts and hypotheses regarding the origin and evolution of all the groups of vertebrate animals (except mammals see GEOSCI 438). Lectures and labs explore the fossil record and history through time of sharks, bony fishes, ancient armored fishes, amphibians, turtles, dinosaurs, pterodactyls, crocodilians, lizards, and birds. Adaptations and extinctions are studied in the context of earth history, paleoecology, and evolution. Three lectures and one lab per week. Graded on the basis of two exams and one term paper.

REQUIRED TEXT: Course Pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 451. Introductory Earth Structure.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001 Meets with Geology 351.001.

Instructor(s): Ben van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 351. (3). (Excl). (BS). Geology and oceanography concentrators should not enroll in GS451, but elect GS 351.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~vdpluijm/gs351.htm

This course offers description and interpretation of geological structures in the Earth's crust and an introduction to global plate tectonics. Topics covered are: mechanics, stress, strain, and deformation; hand-specimen and field description of geological structures; the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting; flow of rocks (rheology); introduction to dislocation theory; microstructural analysis; principles of plate tectonics; and tectonic evolution of selected regions. The course is aimed at those with an interest in geology beyond the introductory level, as well as students who want a basic understanding of the outer Earth's physical properties. Geology and oceanography concentrators should not enroll in GEOSCI 451, but elect GEOSCI 351. Geology graduate students may take this course for credit by permission only. The course meets for three weekly lectures, together with GEOSCI 351; however, laboratory sessions are not included. Grading is based on three exams.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth Structure, by B.A. van der Pluijm and S. Marshak (1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 477. Hydrogeology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Clara Castro (mccastro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Phys. 140 (or 160)/141, Chem. 125/130, and Math. 116; Math. 215/216 are recommended. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to physical and chemical hydrogeology. Emphasis is on processes and direct applications to geological settings. Problem solving is an important course component. The hydrologic cycle, physical rock framework, and properties of aquifer systems will be described and quantified. Groundwater flow and mass transport equations will be covered, as well as pump test design and analysis. Natural tracers and groundwater dating will also be discussed. An introduction to groundwater modeling with simulation of groundwater flow and mass transport will be provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 483. Geophysics: Seismology.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Larry John Ruff (ruff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent election of Math. 215 and Phys. 240 (or 260). (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~ruff/courses.html

This course studies physics of earthquakes and the Earth's interior. Various seismological techniques to infer those from seismic waves are presented. Most treatments are application of physics to the real Earth and basic knowledge of math and physics is required. Geological background is not required. The outline of the course is:

  • basic seismological information including spatial and temporal distribution of earthquakes, magnitude and intensity scales, locating earthquakes, and seismometry;
  • elastic wave theory including stress and strain, seismic wave equations, body and surface waves, refraction and reflection, and free oscillations of the Earth;
  • the Earth's structure; and
  • earthquake source models.

Lecture and laboratory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 486. Geodynamics.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolina R Lithgow-Bertelloni (crlb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GS 420 and prior or concurrent election of Math. 215 and Phys. 240 (or 260). (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces the student to the analysis of dynamic problems in geology and to the mathematical and physical tools by which they are solved. The basic principles of continuum and thermal physics are derived and applied to both small and large scale geological processes with principal emphasis on global processes. Four major topics in continuum physics will be considered in geological context: stress, strain, and elasticity; heat conduction; fluid flow; and advection of heat. The results of simple physical models allow us to explain a range of geophysical observations, including oceanic bathymetry and heat flow, plate kinematics, and the stress within plates. The student should take from the class an understanding of the physical causes of plate tectonics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 489. Geological Sciences Honors.

Primarily for Concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with Geological Sciences 490.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 490. Geological Sciences Honors.

Primarily for Concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with Geological Sciences 489.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 497. Turner Lecture Seminar.

Primarily for Concentrators

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lynn M Walter (lmwalter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two required GeoScience concentration core courses.(1). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/announce/turner02.html

Focuses on current earth science research presented in the Geological Sciences Department's Turner Lecture Series. Students attend a group seminar and the Turner Lecture each week and read a paper by the week's speaker. The seminar group also critically evaluates the substance and style of each presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GEOSCI 498. Research or Special Work.

Primarily for Concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with Geological Sciences 499.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GEOSCI 499. Research or Special Work.

Primarily for Concentrators

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with Geological Sciences 498.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for GEOSCI.


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