Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 5:22 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in German
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for German.


GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
  • Lovic, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac)Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

German 102 is the continuation of German 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Textbook
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

    Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, or 102. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

    The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

    Required Texts:

    • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
    • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500
    Recommended:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition , Macmillan
    • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
    • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning , McGraw-Hill
    • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., CD-Rom, Prentice-Hall
    • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Tutorial Software – Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 112. Second Special Reading Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, and one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. This course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 206. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level German conversation course may not register for German 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in German 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous German 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 212 / SOC 212. Sports and Society.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 – Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies.

    Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Sociology 212.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt , as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in German 221/231.

    Required Text:

    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

    • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main 221/231 course page]:

    • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary , Diogenes, Zuerich
    • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
    • Frisch, Max, Andorra , Suhrkamp
    • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
    • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
    • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland , dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

    Other Recommended Texts:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
    • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
    • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    In this course, students complete the four-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several "special topics" courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Philosophy, History, or Science, in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German in this field throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course.

    Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study, and students can emerge from German 232 with the genuine pride in what they are able to do with their German. More generally, by the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    The special topics and course requirements for this term's sections are given below.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 001 – Contemporary German Society.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 002 – Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm: Their Lives, Scholarship and Collection of Fairy Tales.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    This course will explore the lives of the nineteenth-century scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm and their ever-popular collection of fairy tales. The primary goal of the course will be to situate the most famous work of the Brothers Grimm into their wide-ranging scholarly interests. The course will include an introduction to their lives and scholarship. Both the intellectual motivations behind the fairy tale project and the manner in which the tales were collected will be explored in depth. The course will devote significant time to the tales themselves, including many that are not well-known in the U.S.

    A wide range of materials and assignments will be employed in the course. Required texts include an edition of the tales and a course pack containing excerpts from biographies of the Brothers Grimm, passages from the Grimms' scholarly publications and personal correspondence, and exercises to improve students' reading and writing skills.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 003, 004 – Mathematical and Scientific German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German – practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Required Text

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 005 – Contemporary German Society.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 007 – Classics of German Literature.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    This section offers an introduction to German literature through the reading of some of the most important texts in German (as well as world) literature. Our readings will proceed backwards, from Dürrenmatt (20th century) to Lessing (18th century), passing by such other eminent authors as Kafka, Heine, Goethe, and Schiller.

    Through these texts we will not only deal with literary history, but also touch upon political and social developments, and central issues of German culture. In pursuit of this goal we will read the texts at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity for exploring their meaning and discussing them under a large variety of aspects and perspectives. This means that class participation will be strongly encouraged and, in order to improve both speaking and writing skills in German, a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

    Text used: Dürrenmatt, Friedrich. Der Besuch der alten Dame , ed. Paul Kurt Ackermann, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 008 – Introduction to German Film.

    Instructor(s): Michael R Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

    This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (20-30 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 009 – Introduction to German Film

    Instructor(s): Ilka Rasch

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    GERMAN 306. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level German conversation course may not register for German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken German 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a German 325 (or higher) class. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

    In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 307. German for Medicine.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (1). (Excl).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course, students will read a variety of texts of special interest to students interested in studying medicine. Readings will be taken from newspaper articles on medical issues, from scientific and medical textbooks used by Medizinstudenten at German universities, and from medical journals. Class time will be devoted to clarification of the content of the readings, and, where applicable, to a discussion of theoretical and ethical issues raised by the texts. Course requirements include thorough reading of 2-10 pages of German per week; weekly journal entries on the readings (graded for content, not grammar); development of a "personalized" vocabulary list, 20 words per week, tested every three weeks; attendance and participation; a 15-minute presentation, and a written version thereof to be handed in at the end of the term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 310. Readings in German Culture.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 – Histories of German Cinema. Meets with German 821.002 and Film-Video 603.002.

    Instructor(s): Johannes F Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be elected for a total of four credits. May not be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Foreign Lit Mini/Short course

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/310/001.nsf

    This one-credit course introduces students to some of the landmarks in the long history of German cinema. From the earliest single-shot shorts presented by the brothers Skladanwosky in Berlin's "Wintergarten" in 1895 and so-called "sensation dramas" from the teens, we will follow the rise of German film to international renown with the masterworks of the Weimar era, its uses and abuses by National Socialism, and its various trajectories after World War II: from the "rubble films" of the immediate postwar years to East German DEFA Cinema and the New German Cinema in the West, to the current reconfiguration of German cinema in the wake of unification.

    Titles to be screened will include, among others: Trick of the Light (Die Gebrüder Skladanaowsky , dir. Wim Wenders et al., 1995); The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Das Kabinett des Dr. Caligari , dir. Robert Wiene, 1919); M (dir. Fritz Lang, 1931); Hitler Youth Quex (Hitlerjunge Quex , dir. Hans Steinhoff, 1933); Yesterday Girl (Abschied von Gestern dir. Alexander Kluge, 1966); I Was Nineteen (Ich war 19 , dir. Konrad Wolf 1968); Germany Pale Mother (Deutschland bleiche Mutter , dir. Helma Sanders-Brahms, 1980) and The Harmonists (Comedian Harmonists , dir. J. Vilsmaier , 1997). All films will be in German with English subtitles.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 319. German for Engineering and Industry (LAC).

    Section 001 – (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (1). (Excl).

    Mini/Short course

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course, students will work on the linguistic skills needed for an internship (or permanent employment) with a German engineering or manufacturing company. Readings will include excerpts from technical manuals and company memos. In the second half of the term, students will choose readings individually in accordance with their specific interests; ideally, they will choose materials provided by an employer with whom they have arranged or are trying to arrange an internship.

    Students will be required to develop personalized weekly vocabulary lists based on their readings, and to use these to write a journal of dialogues or memos. The course will include one or more guest lectures in German and English by employees of area businesses with connections to Germany, such as Daimler-Chrysler. The course is intended for concentrators and non-concentrators with a particular interest in science who wish to maintain or augment their German or intend to pursue internships in Germany.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 322 / HISTORY 322. The Origins of Nazism.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu) , Kerstin Barndt

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/history/322/001.nsf

    See History 322.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 001 – Cabaret.

    Instructor(s): Vanessa Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Explore the seamy side of Berlin in the 1920s. In this course on cabaret and the metropolis, we look at the way in which cabaret, - songs, comic monologues, skits, dances and short films – formed a basis for topical commentary on love, sexuality fashion, race, politics and urban life during the Weimar period. The course provides background information on Germany between the wars, and, against this backdrop, we examine cabaret as a critical response to changing social and political conditions. We watch films and read texts by, for example, Hollaender, Reinhardt, Brecht and Tucholsky, and work on improving German writing and speaking skills, We will also create a 'Schall und Rauch' theater of our own, singing and performing cabaret numbers. Not just for Marlene Dietrich wannabes.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 002, 005 – German Youth Cultures.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Love Parade, Fettes Brot, "Crazy": Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear quickly. They stress difference, creativity, and – above all – individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetics are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class.

    This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities and political orientations of youths within the last ten years. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, literature), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this "deutsche Besonderheit – der Mythos Jugend" (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, essays, short grammar assignments, engaged participation in an on-line exchange with students from a German university, motivated physical and oral presence.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 003 – The World According to Alma.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    At the dawn of the 20th century, Alma Schindler was regarded as the most beautiful, talented and intelligent woman in all Vienna. As we read her autiobiography, Mein Leben, we look into the lives and works of artists, writers, composers, musicians and political figures whom she influenced, including her several spouses (Gustav Mahler, Walther Gropius, Franz Werfel) and intimate friends and lovers. We try to understand how art could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos, as Vienna –the city of dreams – came to embrace German Fascism. Readings from Alma's autobiography are supplemented by videos; paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele; musical compositions by herself, Gustav Mahler, Alexander von Zemlinsky, Richard Strauss, Alban Berg, Maurice Ravel, Hanz Pfitzner, Arnold Schönberg, Ernst Krenek; and passages from works by writers such as Georg Büchner, Franz Werfel, Heinrich Mann, Thomas Mann, Bertha Zuckerkandl, Franz Kafka, and others.

    Class time is devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to and discussing music (songs, symphonies and operas), discussing representative works by contemporary authors, and surveying the political events of the time.

    Requirements: at least three oral presentations in class, one two-page essay every second week, a 15-page term-paper, and active participation in class discussions. Alles auf Deutsch, natürlich. Matters of German grammar, style, pronunciation etc. are treated according to the needs of the students. Since students are exposed to far more than they can possibly learn, there are no quizzes, no tests, no final exam–students choose what they want to learn and write about it.

    Required text:

  • a course pack, available at Accu-Copy.
  • Optional but recommended:

  • Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage
  • a good German-English/English-German dictionary
  • Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 004 – Science, Technology, and German Culture, Past and Present.

    Instructor(s): Kevin S Amidon

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course provides students with an opportunity to combine their pursuit of deeper interests in science, technology, and culture with their further study of the German language. The history and contemporary context of several major scientific and technological issues (especially as they relate to Germany and German-speaking countries) will form the basis for class discussions, presentations, and writing. These issues include biology, genetics, and bioethics; nuclear physics and atomic politics; and the links between German science and industry. The course is also designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and discuss their own ideas and interests, and to integrate these interests into their class discussions and assignments.

    The course will be conducted in German, with the goal of improving reading, writing, and speaking abilities. Throughout the course of the term, students (both alone and in groups) will develop topics of special interest to them, with the goal of successfully presenting what they have learned to the class in German, and culminating in a final presentation. Written work will consist of regular journal entries (some on paper, some as e-mail discussions) and some longer analytical assignments (presented as essays on paper, web pages, or in other formats). Reading materials will be partially set by the instructor, and partially provided by students in the course of their investigations (in consultation with the instructor). Students will make two major presentations to the class (in groups or individually), one in the middle of the term and one at the end. Finally, specific problems in German grammar, vocabulary, and usage will be discussed, driven largely by students' own concerns and questions. Regular short quizzes will address these issues. Grading will be based generally evenly on quizzes, written work, presentations, and energy of participation in class work and discussions.

    Students who have completed German 232: Mathematical and Scientific German are particularly welcome, but no special prior knowledge is assumed, and the course is open to all who have passed or been placed beyond a German 232 course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 005 – German Youth Culture

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of six credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/326/005.nsf

    See German 326.002.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    GERMAN 349. Working in Germany.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 231. (1). (Excl).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will prepare students for the experience of a summer internship with a German company. It will help them prepare for the practicalities of living in a German-speaking country for a longer period of time. Topics to be studied include documents and bureaucratic structures, cultural sensitivity, German business practices, and practical aspects of everyday life in Germany. This course is intended for any student about to embark on a summer internship in Germany. One hour per week. Discussion.

    Students will read and discuss a selection of apposite readings; learn and be tested on the specialized vocabularies of German bureaucracy and business; and write three 3-page papers, in German, on German social forms and business practices.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 350. Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business in German; the European Union and Germany's roll therein; trade; traffic and transportation, marketing, industry; money and banking; and ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material, newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams, a number of short reports, papers, and projects and a final exam. The language of instruction is German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course allows students to receive credit for an internship in a German-speaking country completed previous to registering for the course. During the term, the student will complete and turn in a three part report written in German. Part one will be a research paper on the city, area, and country where the student completed the internship. Part two will be a research paper on the company or business which provided the internship. Part three will be a longer journal concerning the daily conduct of the internship and the living situation. Finally, the student will make an oral presentation concerning the internship to either the 350 or the 430 Business German Course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course provides an introduction to German drama of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting aesthetic, cultural, and political shifts during the period. We will pay special attention to the role of history, science, and sex. Readings include plays by Büchner Woyzeck, Wedekind Frühlings Erwachen, Brecht Mutter Courage, and Frisch Andorra. The course is taught in German with occasional English excursions.

    Requirements: two papers (~8pp), attendance, participation.

    In conjunction with German 381, 383, 384, or 385, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or teaching minor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present.

    Section 001 – Taboos: The Forbidden in 19th and 20th-Century German Literature. Meets with German 457.001.

    Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/457/001.nsf

    See German 457.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 406. Conversation Practice.

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

    The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 415. The German Language Past and Present.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Julio Sanchez Hernandez

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methods of descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics and to apply these to a survey of the German language in both its current and past states. We will be concerned with the internal structure of the language; however, we will relate the internal structure to the cultural and social contexts in which the language has evolved and in which it is currently used.

    We will pay attention to the differences between spoken and written varieties of German as well as the relationships between standard German and the many German dialects and regional standards. The class is oriented around group discussion, lectures, and presentations.

    Requirements include brief homework assignments and short essays, a midterm, a final term paper and an oral presentation of the final paper. Readings will be in German and English. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    German 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read and prepare current short newspaper articles, stories, interviews, essays, etc. This textual material serves as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages.

    All class members are expected to give one brief presentation, and lead the subsequent discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3). (Excl).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

    Section 001 – Meets with German 430.451

    Instructor(s): Janet K Van Valkenburg

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goals of German 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

    This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

    This term, German 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

    Section 001 – Taboos:The Forbidden in 19th and 20th-Century German Literature. Meets with German 385.001.

    Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/457/001.nsf

    What are society's dos and don'ts? What constitutes socially and politically acceptable behavior? What can taboos tell us about the transformation of German society?

    This course examines the way in which nineteenth- and twentieth-century German literature deals with taboos that disrupt or reinforce the social, political and moral order. We look at literary manifestations of, for example, the anarchist, 'Emanze', homosexual, collaborator, whore, cannibal, 'bastard', divorcee, at the suicidal, the incestuous and polygamous. The course includes short texts and excerpts from works such as Grimm fairy tales, Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter , Wedekind's Frühlings Erwachen , Freud's Totem und Tabu , Kafka's Die Verwandlung , Schnitzler's Leutnant Gustl , Frisch's Andorra and Christa Wolf's Der geteilte Himmel . The syllabus also looks at German rock, hiphop and rap, and covers films such as Tod in Venedig, Effi Briest, Angst essen Seele auf, Freak Orlando , and Shoah . Taught in German, the course is designed to improve intermediate-level written and spoken German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

    Instructor(s): Amrine

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Upper-Level Writing hopwood-eligible course

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 493 / SOC 493. The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 – Meets with Political Science 489.002.

    Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will analyze a very particular form of political participation, namely the social and historical aspects of fascism and right-wing movements. What is fascism? When does it arise? Who are its supporters? Who are its beneficiaries? What is its relationship to established political institutions? Above all, what is its relationship to that ubiquitous and fascinating social process known as "modernization"? Was it a unique phenomenon "in its own time and place" (i.e., the Europe of the 1920s and 1930s) or does it continue to exist albeit bearing different names and altered disguises?

    The course is divided into two sections. The first section will illuminate certain key aspects of fascism and right-wing movements in a general comparative framework. The emphasis will be on concepts and analyses rather than descriptions and events per se. Still, this section of the course will be deeply anchored in history and empirical reality. We will mainly, though not exclusively, use Germany as our empirical case during this first segment of the course.

    The second section will concentrate on a few countries other than Germany, so that we can compare and contrast realities of fascism which we discussed in the first, conceptual part of the course with the help of added examples. The countries discussed will be Austria, Spain, Italy, Romania, Hungary, Argentina, Japan, and Russia. We will end the course with a discussion of the New Right forms of contemporary right-wing politics so that we can have a fine temporal comparison with the original fascism fifty years later and thus answer the question better as to whether fascism was something unique in its time or rather a larger and more lasting phenomenon of political rule.

    Course requirements: There will be an in-class midterm examination. In addition, there will also be a final paper which will be due on the last day of our class meeting. The paper should be double-spaced, typed, and not exceed twenty (20) pages. It should be on a topic which involves the concepts and materials used in the course. The exact topic will have to be approved by the instructor.

    All books used in this course will be available at the bookstore and also willbe placed on reserve in the library.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

    Section 001 – Krautrock.

    Instructor(s): Michael R Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    A tour of post-war German culture through the radio-waves, nightclubs, and record shops of the divided nation. From the in flux of American popular culture in the immediate post-war years, to the folksinger/activist/poets of the 1960's, to the electronic experimenters of the 1970's, the particulary German take on "punk" in the late 70's and early 80's, the artful banalities of the Neue Deutsche Welle, an uneasy look into the musical culture of the far right, ending with an investigation of post-wall, post-Wende, multicultural Germany's appropriations of rap, hip-hop, and electronica. Song texts in German and English. Discussions in English.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

    Section 002 – Language variation in translation: American films dubbed into German. Meets with Linguistics 492.007.

    Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/german/499/002.nsf

    Linguistic variation (e.g., regional dialects, Ebonics, youth slang etc. ) is often a critical component of character and plot development in film. For instance, in the film Rush Hour , the differences between an African-American police detective and a police detective from Hong Kong are accentuated through differences in their language use. Similarly, in Clueless, differences in a group of high school students' language use helps distinguish the preps from the stoners and jocks.

    The central question for this course concerns how linguistic variation is dubbed into German. We will spend the first part of the course exploring the boundaries of linguistic variation and the similarities and differences between variation in German and variation in American English. The remainder of the course will be devoted to the analysis of mainstream American films that have been dubbed into German. Students will construct their own corpora from a larger corpus of 35 films representing action, drama, comedy, and children's film genres and from those develop research questions (e.g. How is the English second person pronoun 'you' dubbed into German? How is slang dubbed?) based on individual and group interests.

    The course is oriented as a collaborative research seminar, in which students are highly encouraged to work in independent teams oriented around a single problem or corpus (e.g., action films or children's film). Students will be expected to present their research to the class, write short reports about their projects, and maintain a research diary. Although students should be proficient enough in German to be able to understand a full-length feature film, native-like fluency is not required. Discussion will be in English and German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 504. History of the German Language.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The main focus of this course is the development of the German language and its dialects, beginning with the earliest reconstructible stages and working forward through time to the present day. We shall investigate traditional questions of Germanic linguistics – changes in sound patterns, grammatical structures and vocabulary, the role of German vs. Latin as an acceptable written medium, German "under attack" from foreign influences – in the context of social, cultural, economic, religious, and political trends and events that shaped central Europe. We shall read and discuss previous research in Germanic linguistics, thus gaining an understanding of the development of the discipline as well as of the language itself. The linguistic data with which we will be working will be in German; readings will be in German and in English. Familiarity with basic linguistic terminology will be helpful, but by no means required. We will not dwell on the intricacies of Indo-European and Germanic sound laws or of theoretical debates, but will strive to develop an ability to analyze and discuss important historical issues. Readings (available in a course pack at Accu-Copy) will be heavy. Students will give several informal reports in class during the academic term, write a term paper, and give a formal presentation of the term-paper in class. No quizzes, no tests, no exams. Only reading, writing, and discussing. Undergraduates are more than welcome.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    Graduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


    Page Counter


    This page was created at 5:22 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.


    lsa logo

    University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

    This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

    Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

    Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.