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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies


This page was created at 5:22 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HJCS

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.


HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Pauli Weizman (pauliw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Milka Eliav

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Omri Yavin (omriy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Ilan Rosenberg (ilanr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 296 / JUDAIC 296 / RELIGION 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust.

Judaic Cultural Studies in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A study of the Holocaust as a historical event and its impact on Jewish thought and culture. We first survey the historical context: the European Jewish community on the eve of the destruction, and the events leading up to and culminating in that destruction. We then will focus on inner Jewish (and gentile) reactions to the Holocaust, and broader philosophical and ethical implications. We ask: What are the problems (moral, emotional, conceptual) in reading and writing about the Holocaust? What are its implications for those of us who come "after"? The course is also a meditation on visions of the Other, on ethnic-religious hatred, tolerance, and healing. Course materials include memoirs, poetry, fiction, psychological literature, as well as conversations with survivors. Take-home midterm; final exam; 5-8 page paper; journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HJCS 302. Advanced Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 301. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of the Hebrew sequence comprising the second term of the third-year Hebrew class. (Participation in Hebrew 301 offered in the previous term is not required if the student is at the advanced level.) The focus will be on developing proficiency in all five languages skills. Student participation is an essential part of the course. Readings will include short works of fiction as well as journalistic pieces. This will be supplemented by other media including music, video, recordings, readings, etc. Students' grades will be determined on the basis of assignments, participation (including in-class presentations), and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HJCS 472. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature, II.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raz Yosef (razy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 302. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will discuss, compare, and contrast the relationship between major Modern Hebrew writings and film adaptations. Tracing artistic, stylistic, thematic, and ideological similarities and differences between novel and film, the course will explore the ways meanings are produced, recycled, and transformed from novel to screen. We will raise questions such as: can an adaptation ever be "faithful" to its literary source? What kinds of stylistic equivalencies and transmutations are possible across the two media? Using feminist, post-colonial and critical historiographic theories, we will examine central historical and political discourses in the readings of both the literary and cinematic works of Israeli society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Politics of Culture in Hebrew Literature: Ethnicity. Meets with Comparative Literature 490.002 and Judaic Studies 317.001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many Israelis will tell you happily that problems with ethnicity are over. They can point to increasing interethnic marriages, to the many Mizrahim (Jews of Middle Eastern and North African origin) in the music scene, and even to the fact that the newly appointed Israeli president is of Iranian origin. And yet, the increasing rich volume of works of literature, films, plays, and poetry produced by Mizrahim in the last thirty years tells a different story. It tells that Mizrahi culture is deeply engaged with challenging and expanding further the discussion of post Zionism, and is central in shaping current debates about the politics of culture in Israeli society. It is this story that this course will try to construct with readings, in translation, of works by writers such as Ronit Matalon, Shimon Ballas, Albert Swissa; the poetry of Miri Ben Simhon, Sami Schetrit and Amira Hess; music by Zehava Ben, and films by Moshe Mizrahi, Rami Kimchi, David Ofek, and Buzaglo. At the same time, we will focus on how these writers address general questions of hegemonic language, discursive space, legitimacy, mapping and ethnic location, and subjectivity; how they challenge and approximate the canon and their notion of the homeland; and how their difference and otherness are slowly reshaping the landscape of Israeli culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 Nationalism and Visual Representations in Media and Films.

Instructor(s): Raz Yosef (razy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the complex role played by Israeli cinema in the construction of modern Israeli nationalism along the axes of cardinal historical and socio-political events and discourses of Israeli society, such as the Zionist project, the military culture, interethnic tension between Mizrahi and Ashkenazi Israeli Jews, the Holocaust and the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. Using post-colonial, feminist, queer and critical historiographic methodologies, we will examine visual tropes, themes, and narrative structures that inform the representation of Israeli national identity. We will critically view classical and contemporary Israeli films; try to expose the ambivalence, contradictions and multiple voices of Israeli society, and offer an alternative reading to the dominant national discourse. This course is open to undergraduates and graduate students. Graduate students have additional assignments and are expected to write a longer and more theoretically oriented paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HJCS 577 / JUDAIC 467 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

General HJCS

Section 001 Models of Jewish Renewal.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores several key examples of Jewish spiritual questing and renewal in the 20th century. Among the sources to be explored are Martin Buber and his theology of the holiness of relationship (pan-sacramental urge) and the intentional community around Kalonymous Kalman Shapira, the rebbe of the Warsaw ghetto, who developed a mystical fellowship and practice of soul-quieting/silence that bears interesting parallels to Vipassana meditation. The bulk of the course will be devoted to works (texts, memoirs, theology, devotional music) emerging from the so-called "Jewish renewal movement," which seeks sources as diverse as feminism, deep ecology, East Asian contemplative traditions, and "the politics of meaning." Authors to read include Arthur Green, Arthur Waskow, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, Judith Plaskow, Tirzah Firestone, Sylvia Boorstein, and Rodger Kamenetz.

(These latter figures explore the growing contemporary interchange between certain Buddhist and Jewish practices). We ask: how do these experiments alter/depart from/up-end/deepen traditional Jewish practices and spiritual direction? In so doing we raise questions regarding the multi-form shape and volatile nature of "Judaism" at the turn of the 21st century. As a final counterpart (or exclamation point), we will explore examples of engaged Orthodox renewal, and the spiritual skepticism and quest of Leon Wieseltier.

The course is conducted as a seminar, with a good deal of give-and-take. It calls for both intellectual rigor and engagement: to understand Judaism not only as "argument" but as "deep song." Occasional film, music, and examples of contemplative practice will deepen our inquire. Background in Judaic Studies or the study of Religion (including contemplative practice). Short essays, term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HJCS.


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This page was created at 5:22 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.


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