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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in College Honors


This page was created at 5:23 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in College Honors
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HONORS

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for College Honors.


HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 Academic Discourse. Meets with Linguistics 319.001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 319.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 Exploring the Psychological Underground of Power. Meets with Psychology 401.007.

Instructor(s): David Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines power from several related psychological perspectives. We begin with a survey of the phenomenology of power, that is, what it "feels like" to exercise power over another person or group. We then explore several topics relating to power:

  • some possible biological and physiological bases of these feelings,
  • psychological theories about the nature and meaning of the power experience,
  • the effects of power on others, both good effects (e.g., inspirational leadership) and bad (oppression),
  • the effects on the powerholder,
  • links between power, aggression, and sexuality,
  • power and the creation of "difference" among people,
  • the psychological and cultural origins of power drives, and
  • whether (and how) power can be tamed or even given up.

Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from other social sciences, and from literature. The course does not have any particular prerequisites beyond a strong interest in the topic and curiosity, though an introductory psychology course would be helpful.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 003 Alternative Realities: Science and the Study of Human Perception.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate a number of broad, highly subjective, inherently interesting questions about the nature of human perception. The broadest of these will be the question of cultural relativism: Do people from widely different cultures experience immediate reality in fundamentally different ways? The alternative realities to be explored will be those attributable to cultures, subcultures, cults, historical eras, substances (i.e., drugs), and mental illness. Most importantly, the scientific reality will also be presented in this context. Grades will be determined entirely by writing papers, which will be individually developed and evaluated through individual tutorial meetings held every three or four weeks at the instructor's office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 004 Law and Psychology.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt, as well as some fictional accounts e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues such as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome. Each student will write a weekly commentary as well as a closing argument that will be presented to the class for one of the cases under consideration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 Numbers and Reasons.

Instructor(s): Fred L Bookstein (flb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (NS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an underclass course in how numbers are used in argument about patterns in the world. Initially it appears that these uses are diverse. Measurement in the natural sciences typically deals with true values (constants); measurement in the behavioral and social sciences, with problems of managing social systems. Measurements in sciences on the boundary, like neuropsychology or medicine, attempt with variable success to capture stable latent aspects of individual hidden states or histories. In this course we try to sort out much of this variation by careful attention to the logical role of quantification in the versions of reality constructed by the various disciplines we consider, from astrophysics through historical sociology. The approach is by various methods, including cognition, arithmetic, history of science, and the careful analysis of instrument readings, answers to questions, and various visual representations of same. Four specifically statistical themes--least squares, the normal distribution, inverse probability, and regression--are covered in brief lectures, but there is no associated "homework." Reading load: heavy, about 1500 pages over the semester, plus an optional reading list of some 75 additional volumes. Writing: Four short papers and a term paper Maximum class size - 15 Enrollment is by permission of the Honors Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department

HONORS 290. Honors Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 292. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 390. Junior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Complexity and Emergence. (2 credits). Class will meet from Jan 15 thru Mar 14, 2002. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27) .

Instructor(s): John H Holland (jholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many of our most perplexing problems inner city decay, trade balances, control of epidemics, and effective education, to name a few arise when a large number of individuals interact and, in the process, adapt to each other. Such systems are called complex adaptive systems. Simple reduction, where we sum up the activity of the parts to get the behavior of the whole, does not work for these systems. The whole is genuinely more than the sum of the parts for complex adaptive systems, a phenomenon called emergence.

The object of this course is to give a broad understanding of complex adaptive systems, both the form of the problems that attend such systems and the ways of approaching such problems. Along the way we will look into the creative process, particularly as it occurs in the "two great P's of human intellectual endeavor, Poetry and Physics."

Readings: Roughly 200 pages selected from HIDDEN ORDER and EMERGENCE (both books authored by Professor Holland and published by Addison-Wesley).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 002 Ramifications of a Networked World. (1 credit). Course meets March 5-21. (Drop/Add deadline=March 11).

Instructor(s): Clinton Brooks

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with permission of the Honors Program.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our world is networked. The premise is that we do not have the models right for understanding the ramifications of this or how to function in such a world. We are applying industrial age thinking. The United States was deliberately established as a representative democracy, based on geography. The Internet may be making traditional geographic boundaries meaningless. I am writing this synopsis in September 2001. By the time of this seminar in March 2002 the U.S. may be at "war" with a terrorist network. What does this mean? What are the ramifications of networks on our governance processes? The intent of this seminar is for the participants to get beyond the hype abounding about the Internet and the media to dialogue about what we think we are experiencing and what the ramifications may be. Your generation is, perhaps mainly unconsciously, shaping the networks with their effects that you will live with. We will set the focus of the seminar as a function of the background, knowledge, interests, and concerns of the participants.

Class Meeting Dates:
March 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, & 21, 2002
3:00 to 5:00
1303 Mason Hall

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for HONORS.


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