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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars


This page was created at 5:28 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LHSP

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Lloyd Hall Scholars.


A total of 20 credits of LHSP courses may be counted toward the minimum 120 credits required for an LS&A degree.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 Students Against Violence Everywhere (S.A.V.E.).

Instructor(s): Kate Winner (kwinner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students Against Violence Everywhere (S.A.V.E.) works to create violence awareness and teach peaceful conflict resolution. By educating elementary school aged children in the Ypsilanti school system, S.A.V.E. allows UM students to lead activities and projects in order to promote these goals. Through mentorship with these children S.A.V.E. participants teach alternatives to violent conflict resolution. This course will be held on Monday evenings at 7:00 PM (students will also be required to participate in in-school sessions on alternating Thursdays from 3:15 to 5:15).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 Solving Hunger.

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster (pskuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/lhsp/100/002.nsf

Have you ever thought deeply about what it means to be hungry? Have you wanted to help the people who face poverty, homelessness, and hunger every day? Have you wondered about the lives of the hungry and homeless in Ann Arbor?

In this course we will not only discuss the issue of hunger but also do something about it! Every third Tuesday we'll prepare and serve a hot meal to those in need through the Hunger Coalition of Ann Arbor. We'll read and reflect on the causes of hunger and homelessness. The class will get to know first hand the people in Ann Arbor who struggle for food and live with poverty. We'll look at different approaches to the issue and devote our own time and energy to solving it.

The class will meet during the first eight weeks of the semester from 5:006:00 on Tuesdays. On the third Tuesday of every month throughout the term, students will volunteer at the Hunger Coalition for two hours from 3:005:00 or 5:007:00. Please note that a commitment to volunteer every third Tuesday throughout the term is a requirement of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 003 Confronting the Unspeakable: Sexual Assualt.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Smith (nicksmit@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we talk about uncomfortable things? Take, for example, sexual assault. Far too often this serious problem is simply swept under the carpet, brought out into the open to be discussed by the community only after a serious and public event that simply cannot be ignored. Most of the time, however, people go out of their way to avoid talking to others about this sensitive subject. We seem to think that if we don't discuss it, we won't have to worry about it. Well, in this course we will discuss the sensitive subject of sexual assault, directly and openly. We will discuss why people avoid discussing sexual assault, and the effects on our community when we don't talk about the issue. Our discussion will extend outside our classroom, as well, as we organize and host various programs and events designed to make people more aware of sexual assault, and to provide them with suggestions and options for how to combat this problem.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 004 Backstage Community Theater.

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker (marktuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you ever wanted to work backstage in the theater? Want to see what makes participating in community theater so much fun? Here's your chance to find out first hand. Ann Arbor's Burns Park Players are putting on Annie this winter. The Burns Park Players is a non-profit neighborhood organization, which has been putting on musicals for almost 20 years. All of the proceeds from the productions directly benefit the arts programming in Ann Arbor's elementary schools. Come be a part of a great tradition and learn how to make scenery and props for this fun musical!

Due to the nature of theater, a significant time commitment is necessary. Our first meeting will be held Thursday, January 10th from 8:009:00 PM in the Art Studio at Alice Lloyd Hall. Thereafter we will be meeting at the Auditorium of Tappan Junior High School to work on the play. Come dressed in old clothes and prepared to have fun and work hard!

You may choose from the following work schedule:

  • Saturdays (January 12, 19, and 26) from 1:005:00 PM
    OR:
  • Sundays (January 13, 20, and 27) from 1:005:00 PM

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 005 Exploring Ann Arbor.

Instructor(s): Ben McDonough (mcdonou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Did you know that whole other sides of Ann Arbor exist, west of State Street and east of Markley? The Performance Network, the Fox Village cinema, Main Street cafés, Nichols Arboretum, and Yost Ice Arena are much closer than you might think. This course will explore the history of Ann Arbor by doing. In class, we will spend much of our time trekking through neighborhoods and visiting significant Ann Arbor sites in an effort to get you out of Lloyd and about in town. Out of class, you will describe your impressions of the city in bi-weekly journal assignments and build a website after taking a workshop on web design. This section of this course may occasionally meet on Thursday nights, so be sure to keep your schedules free!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 006 Exploring Ann Arbor.

Instructor(s): Rachael Weisz (reckhous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Did you know that whole other sides of Ann Arbor exist, west of State Street and east of Markley? The Performance Network, the Fox Village cinema, Main Street cafés, Nichols Arboretum, and Yost Ice Arena are much closer than you might think. This course will explore the history of Ann Arbor by doing. In class, we will spend much of our time trekking through neighborhoods and visiting significant Ann Arbor sites in an effort to get you out of Lloyd and about in town. Out of class, you will describe your impressions of the city in bi-weekly journal assignments and build a website after taking a workshop on web design. This section of this course may occasionally meet on Thursday nights, so be sure to keep your schedules free!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 001 Academic/Career Exploration.

Instructor(s): Marc Vera (mvera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

You may be coming to the University with some common questions: How will I find what I need at this huge institution? What is a concentration? How do I choose one? How can my education fulfill the interests I had in high school, and how can I explore new areas? How will my education lead to a job after college? LHSP 101 can help you find the answers to these questions by introducing you to the numerous resources at the University as well as helping you form the difficult questions you need to ask yourself to guide your academic career.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 002 Academic and Career Exploration.

Instructor(s): Jeff Wilson (wilsonjk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

You may be coming to the University with some common questions: How will I find what I need at this huge institution? What is a concentration? How do I choose one? How can my education fulfill the interests I had in high school, and how can I explore new areas? How will my education lead to a job after college? LHSP 101 can help you find the answers to these questions by introducing you to the numerous resources at the University as well as helping you form the difficult questions you need to ask yourself to guide your academic career.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 003 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


LHSP 113. Studies in Social and Political History II.

Section 001 In Search of America's Civil Rights Movement.

Instructor(s): Alyssa Picard (picarda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class, a corequisite for LHSP 151.004 (hereafter, "the bus trip"), explores the origins, course, and outcomes of the civil rights movement, which some historians have described as the most successful nonviolent movement for social change in American history. In this course, you'll learn about the religious and political roots of the civil rights movement, examine the motives of the people who took part in the movement (and of those who opposed it), and prepare yourselves for your experience in LHSP 151.004. After the trip, we'll be incorporating your experiences into our classwork as we continue to study the ambiguous legacy of the civil rights movement. Is the civil rights movement over? If it has ended, when did it end? And if it continues, in what contemporary movements are its values best embodied?

If you are registering for this class, you must also plan to take the bus trip, and vice versa. Whatever else you were planning to do over spring break can wait: this will be the experience of a lifetime.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 115. Literature and the Arts in Society, II.

Section 001 Don't Brand Me! Music, Logos, and Lies, Oh My!

Instructor(s): Marc Vera (mvera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

You have been targeted. Businesses want your money, and they know they can get it. How? Don't you watch TV, listen to music, go to the movies? It's everywhere. The media are out to get you. In this course we will address the topic of "branding" and how it relates to advertising, music, and film. Why is it that when you see a Chihuahua you think Taco Bell? How can you hear music and automatically classify it? You will learn about the tactics used by companies to hook you in to their product, their style. Subcultures will play a large role in our discussion, as well as preconceived notions of what is "normal." We will read books such as No Logo, Nobrow, and You Are Being Lied To. There will be weekly music listening assignments and you will develop your own marketing scheme for a band. We will watch films, movie trailers, music videos, and cartoons. You will keep a weekly journal and write one short (3-5 page) and one long (8-10 page) paper. By the end of the course you will think twice about the ads in Vogue, what is played on MTV, and why you want to see a film with Julia Stiles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 001 Procreation or Recreation: Can We Control Ourselves?

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster (pskuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/lhsp/125/001.nsf

Do condoms make people promiscuous? Do we have sex for the "right" reasons? How do these reasons affect the law?

Sexuality is on the books, from pornography and contraception to rape and abortion. The law controls what we're not supposed to look at before our eighteenth birthday and whether we're allowed to buy birth control pills. The government decides whether schools teach us about the birds and bees or the diaphragm and the dental dam. And as much as TV has changed since Leave it to Beaver, so has the law.

Participants in this course will look at the way sexual values shape society's rules and put words to their own views and experiences. We'll find out who the rule makers are and whether they care about what we think.

We will use fiction and film in our investigation of attitudes about sex. The class will look at the law and the people who have worked to change it. Students will explore their own beliefs through writing and discover whether the current legal state supports or conflicts with their own values. We'll learn to disagree with each other about the most controversial of topics and to back up what we believe with our words.

Five assigned papers throughout the term will allow students to express how they feel about sex and discover if and how those feelings are represented in the law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 002 Affirmative Action or Legal Discrimination: A Case Study of the University of Michigan Law Suits.

Instructor(s): Ben McDonough (mcdonou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/lhsp/125/002.nsf

If you have ever considered becoming a lawyer or simply had an interest in law or government, this course will give you a taste of the preoccupation of lawyers and judges who evaluate cases of legal discrimination. We will explore ground-breaking historical cases of legal discrimination as preparation for an examination of the current affirmative actions cases facing your new university. This course is targeted at students with little or no knowledge of the law, but who have an interest in learning more about it.

To get our legal juices flowing and to give you an introduction to reading cases, we will start with one fairly straightforward, early decision of the United States Supreme Court, Johnson v. M'Intosh, a case that showed clear legal discrimination against Native Americans. We will read at least three affirmative action cases, including the groundbreaking case, Bakke v. The Regents of the University of California, as well as two university cases, Grutter v. Bollinger, et. al, and Gratz v. Bollinger, et. al., and track new developments in these cases over the course of the term. Studying these cases will help us understand affirmative action, its history and grounding in our legal system, and its value and cost to our society.

By studying law and well-reasoned argumentative thinking, the stuff that forms the basis of all good law, we will sharpen our critical reading skills and our argumentative writing skills. The cases and related essays will deepen our understanding of the law and show its potential to be contorted, distorted, and abused. Since writing is the law's ultimate form of expression in our society, it serves as an especially appropriate subject for a course on argumentative writing. In addition, because legal writing follows certain stylistic conventions, it also serves as an instructive tool for clear, organized, and coherent expression. The final goal of the course to have fun!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 003 One People, One State, One Leader: Nazism and the Persuasive Power of Propaganda.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Wilson (wilsonjk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you ever wondered how the Nazis came to power, or why the Germans so enthusiastically embraced Hitler? Over the course of the term, we will address these and several other key questions regarding Nazism: Who joined the movement? Who voted for Hitler? How did the National Socialist regime function? And was there any resistance? And, perhaps most troubling of all, how were the Germans capable of the Holocaust? To answer these questions, we will study several documents from the period, including official edicts, private correspondence, and propaganda films (primary texts), as well as current historical scholarship, such as Burleigh and Wipperman's The Racial State (secondary texts). Though the analysis of these primary and secondary sources, we will explore how history is as much about arguments as it is about facts. Our main aim is to learn how historians and others articulate their arguments and how to understand and critically engage with them. As this is a writing course, you will spend a significant part of the term developing your argumentative writing skills. There will be five written assignments over the course of the term based on the course materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 004 Body Image: Self-Identity and Personal Expression.

Instructor(s): Manju Karki (mkarki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does self-identity and body image mean to you? How do the practices and significance of inscribing the body differ across cultures? We will explore the different ways of defining body image and the cost of maintaining those images, such as eating disorders, plastic surgery and liposuction. To supplement our knowledge, we will consider the role of the media in portraying so called "ideal images" to the society. We will discuss newspaper articles and view documentaries that voyage into some of the most controversial subcultures that use body art as physical and symbolic representation of their politics and personalities. This course will invite you to explore the spectrum of practices in body art, from the traditional to the popular. For example, how does the significance of tattooing one's body differ between American mall culture and the tribes of the Samoan Islands? Furthermore, we will look into some of the most controversial politics of inscribing the body, such as female genital circumcision. Most importantly, you will have the opportunity to analyze your perception about body image, body art, and its personal/cultural significance in class discussions and in a series of argumentative essays. The course will provide you with the opportunity to express your thoughts critically using one of the most effective tools we have writing. The goal of this course is to assist you in shaping your ideas and developing your voice into a distinct form of personal expression that reflects your unique identity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 005 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 On Writing: Approaching the Blank Page.

Instructor(s): D. Lani Pascual (dpascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For a while, writing was powerful: we wrote runaway notes to our parents, I-love-you notes to our grandparents, and romantic poems to our cousins that we hid away in journals. Later in life we wrote song lyrics and fantasized about performing them on stage; we may even have written diaries and aspired to turn them into published memoirs. Then one day, between our kindergarten crayoned "A" and that essay we wrote admission to college, writing stopped being creative and powerful; instead, it became an exercise, a chore. And without any conscious decision, we simply stopped writing. No more poems, no more lyrics, no more diaries, no more stories. Pages once easy to fill, lay empty and abandoned. What happened? In this creative writing course, we will work to rediscover the expressive freedom and technical craftsmanship of creative writing. You will identify and study your influences in a reading list of your own design. You will also compose several short pieces that challenge the limits of your creativity and develop your talent. Most importantly, you will complete this course with a polished, innovative, and original work of creative expression--from poetry to prose, welcoming everything in between. Class discussions will focus on the craft of writing and student workshops.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 002 From Kansas to Munchkinland: Drawing and Painting.

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker (marktuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Close your eyes and imagine that you were born completely without sight. Now imagine that your sight was miraculously restored. What would you "see"? Look at your hand and wiggle your fingers. Is this what you expected your hand to look like? Would you be able to comprehend the world around you or would everything be such a confusing mass of shapes, lines, colors, textures, spaces, shadows and light that you feel suffocated by the overwhelming complexity of it all?

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to draw and paint requires you to look at the world more closely and to record what you see more accurately. Learning to see, not what you "think" you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through drawing and painting you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are.

The first half of the course will be spent in black and white, drawing the human body; something simultaneously intimate and yet completely foreign. The second half of the course will concentrate on seeing the world in color through painting. Bring an open mind and plenty of stamina because the first few weeks will feel much like learning how to ride a bike - blind, of course.

Note: This course will require the purchase of art materials related to drawing and painting. A specific list of materials will be available on the first day of class. There is also a lab fee of $40, which will cover the hiring of the model(s). Expect at least 4 hours per week of drawing/painting assignments in addition to class attendance and participation. There will also be field trips to museums and artist's studios, which will be scheduled separately.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 003 Experimental Art.

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs (tubbsbl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Art is a personal and developmental process of communication, and to that end, the objective of this course is to overcome our inhibitions destroying the barriers and preconceptions around making art. In this course we will explore the unfamiliar, experiment, learn new skills, and build your confidence, enabling you to trust your creative instincts. Research of childrens' art, graffiti, and conceptual work give supporting background to this intuitive process. You will explore your own ideas in charcoal, paint, collage, mixed media, and even performance art, and then create a final piece for exhibition. BEWARE!! Wear clothing you can get paint on so we can really have some fun. Lab fee: $50

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 004 Humor and the Creative Non-Fiction Essay.

Instructor(s): Joy Ritchey (jritchey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course in creative non-fiction will focus on humor. While the core of the course will be concerned with your own writing, the assigned reading will include Jonathon Swift, Benjamin Franklin, Mark Twain, Woody Allen, Karen Finley, Fran Liebowitz, and David Sedaris. Students will have a great deal of control over course material. We will study the ironic, the absurd, the obscene, and the satirical with an eye towards putting such devices to use in your own essays. Course requirements include an in-class presentation, an analytic essay, several short writing assignments, and one longer writing project. We will concern ourselves with the analysis of humorous devices and their application in all sort of writing, including the personal narrative, and social commentary. The course will function as a seminar and writing workshop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 150. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Addressing by Undressing: The Relationship and Differences Between Black and White People. (1 credit). Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Rebecca Cottingham

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will give students a safe atmosphere within which they can express their feelings and thoughts concerning the taboos in Black and White culture. Students will be looking at events in history that laid the foundation for relationships that are manifested today. By examining other areas (e.g., stereotypes, derogatory words/phrases) students will learn about the origins of each and take action in their own use of stereotypes and derogatory language.

Through comparison of popular literary figures that are pushed to the forefront as being "American" or "Black" writers, students will see the separations that still occur in America and discuss their reactions. Students will have the opportunity to hear from fellow students who have first-hand knowledge of Mississippi, a state that still operates in the past. Students will leave this course with a better understanding of how the "race card" still operates in our world today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Managing Your Money. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Noel Liley (nliley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you ever been frustrated by money? Do you ever wonder why you make the decisions you do regarding your money? Do you try each month to save and then wonder where all of your money has gone? Do you have questions about how to manage your money in the future?

This course will take a comprehensive look at fiscal management and responsibility as they relate to societal and family values. Students in this course will explore their own values about money and how they connect to their actual fiscal management habits. Throughout the course students will engage in personal goal-setting, values exploration, and assessment exercises to help them meet their financial management needs. While the course is designed to be a very personal and individual exploration of money management, students will be expected to engage in classroom discussions and share their experiences with their classmates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Three Therories of Human Nature. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): John Cantu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We often are told that we "ought" to be something or another. And when we ask why this should be so, the most common answer is because it is "human nature."

But this very commonplace and common sense notion of "human nature" is not very common or sensible when examined carefully. Indeed, the more we investigate these seemingly simple claims, the exceedingly more confusing they become.

Are we like Plato supposes creatures whose sense of self is solely dependent on our belief of ideas? Alternatively, are we to borrow from Marx nothing more than social creatures whose lives in economic society determine our sense of culture, politics, and self? Or are we as Sartre believes condemned to freedom where choices determine our values?

Are there answers to be found? According to some of these theorists, yes. And according to others, no. Such is the philosophic condition. Our venture will not be to definitively settle any of these nettlesome issues. Rather, in the spirit of all noble introductory philosophic ventures: The journey of self-exploration will have to be worthy of itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Battle Hymns and Protest Songs. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Lorenzo Buj

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Rock 'n' roll may at bottom be a hedonistic art form, but it can also give voice to larger historical concerns. At various times it has been a means of social protest or political self-expression, often by carrying messages of alienation or holding out for justice and utopian solutions. Rock, in other words, has often fulfilled a counter-cultural function, being critical of the lapses in American democracy or the failings of ideology. At the same time, American popular music from the Civil War onward has had its share of righteous and inspiring songs, patriotic hymns and battle anthems for what is perceived to be a just cause. This course will be focused mostly on rock 'n' roll music, studying how it reflects the social and political upheavals of a particular time (selecting issues from the Civil Rights era, through Vietman, and into the lone-superpower period of the past decade), but it will also range into the pre-rock era and into contexts other than those directly affecting the U.S. The basic unit of study will be the individual song, with samples coming from The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Coca-Cola jingles, Chuck Berry, Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Sly Stone, The Sex Pistols, The Clash, Kraftwerk, Bruce Sprinsteen, Tracy Chapman, Public Enemy, Rage Against the Machine, and Radiohead.

Assignments will include two or three very short essays and a group presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 004 Get on the Bus: In Search of America's Civil Rights Movement. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Teresa Buckwalter (tbuckwal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Note: Concurrent enrollment in LHSP 113.001 is required for this course.

What are you doing for spring break? Are you going to Ft. Lauderdale? Cancun? Or do you want something different something you will remember long after your sunburn heals and your hangover fades? If you do, then look no further. We'll get you out of Ann Arbor and out of the classroom. We'll take you places that you have never seen before. We'll show you what it was like to risk your life in the cause of freedom.

In this course, you will visit the people and places of America's Civil Rights Movement. You will see the sites of Martin Luther King's birth and most famous speech, as well as the locations of famous demonstrations and protests from Tennessee to Mississippi. Along the way, you will meet people who were there on the front line in the fight for civil rights and often no older than you at the time.

The requirements for this class are simple. You must register for LHSP 113.001, a three-credit course on the history of the Civil Rights Movement. During the trip, you must keep a detailed journal of your impressions and experiences. If last year offers any guide, the cost of this trip to you will be modest. So leave your books, your computer, and your sun block behind. Come experience history with your own eyes.

If you have any questions about the trip, please email Teresa Buckwalter at tbuckwal@umich.edu or Joseph Gonzalez at joegon@umich.edu.

NOTE: The first mandatory class meeting will be Wednesday, January 9, 2002 in Klein Lounge at 7 P.M.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 005 Lord of the Rings. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): David Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings is one of the most widely read, and beloved books of the second half of the twentieth century. And, this December, it will be brought to the screen in one of the most ambitious cinematic projects of all time. What is it that that makes Tolkien's work so compelling? Perhaps as remarkable as Tolkien's success is that fact that he wrote The Lord of the Rings at all. He was not a writer of fiction by profession; instead he was the notably under-productive (even in the Oxford of the 1930s-50s) Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo Saxon at Oxford. With very few (but excellent) works of scholarship to his credit, colleagues at times wondered what he was doing. Part of the answer was that he was grading papers for money orphaned at an early age, with a large family, he was always chronically short of cash. Indeed, it was on the backs of examination papers that he began to compose his fiction. The Hobbit, his breakthrough (and at that point only) book appeared almost by accident: he lent the unfinished manuscript to a friend who had the flu and she passed it on to a former student of Tolkien's who worked for a publishing house.

The Lord of the Rings sprang from the rejection of another work that Tolkien really wanted to publish (and never did in his lifetime). Now we can watch the evolution of his story from the first drafts through his own later efforts to the interpretation of his work for the screen. The existence of so many of Tolkien's letters and papers gives us a chance to watch the author at work, and to explore fundamental questions about what it means to be a writer.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 006 Cleopatra and other "Dangerous Women." Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): David Potter (dsp@umich.edu) , Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Late in 1999 a papyrus upon which was written an enormous land grant to a Roman officer was reread, and upon the text was found a single word (in Greek) approving the grant. The scholar who read it thought that the only possible person to write this one word was Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt, the famous Cleopatra, removed suddenly from the world of fiction and the imagination and suddenly replaced in her role as the Macedonian queen of Egypt.

Who was this Cleopatra? In her own time and throughout subsequent centuries, she has been more image than flesh and blood character. In some sense, the last person to take her seriously was Queen Zenobia of Palmyra, who adopted her name and monuments when she tried to lay claim to the eastern Roman empire in the third century AD, and, like Cleopatra, she joined the pantheon of dangerous women in the imagination of the ancient world. We will begin by studying the image of the dangerous female, beginning with Circe and Medea through Virgil's Dido, looking at the way that they are handled in Greek and Roman thought, and then move on to look at what we really know about Cleopatra as a figure in the history of Egypt and the Middle East. Cleopatra had the misfortune of picking the wrong side in the Roman civil wars of the thirties BC, and thus became the new Medea, ruining both the men she met and herself through her unwillingness to accept a passive role. From the Roman Mediterranean of the first century BC to the screens of the late twentieth century, we will then trace the way that the figure of Cleopatra and her fictional counterparts have been treated in art and literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 007 Russia on the Great Lakes. Eight-week minicourse. (Drop/Add deadline=January 27).

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will look at the shape and character of an exemplary and growing community of new immigrants to Southeast Michigan, native speakers of Russian from the former Soviet Union. Themselves forming very diverse communities, they provide insight into one of the most interesting and significant phenomena in today's United States the many worlds created and sustained by waves of immigration from all over the world. The course will examine the cultural, economic, legal, linguistic, national, generational, and other issues which unite and/or divide these immigrants. We will examine accounts of "being in America" and "being an American" provided by various immigrants from Russia. We will look at institutions, which play a role in these communities, from local Orthodox Churches, Synagogues, and related bodies, to newspapers, stores, and cultural events such as concerts and plays. We will talk to representatives of some of these institutions and to some of the immigrants themselves, and will attempt to map out a cultural geography of this world, largely invisible to the outsider, but actually extensive and complex. During the course, students will be encouraged to explore parallels with other immigrant communities (for example, Southeast Michigan is home to many Arab-Americans, and has a significant Hispanic population as well). The course will include reading and viewing assignments, field trips, interviews, and research on the World Wide Web, and will require one eight-page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


LHSP 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Living Liminally: The "Unreal" in Campus Life.

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One often hears the comment "college life is not real life." While there may be some truth to this statement, it is usually in the context of some disparagement of the supposed utopian undergraduate experience that outsiders of various sorts make such statements. But are there aspects of "America at Play" that the media and other analysts or observers have neglected to address? Identifying the "unreal" in college life can serve as an impetus for exploring not only misconceptions about, but also the positive contributions of, the university experience. Personal and professional exploration of this mythical unreal realm will constitute the core of our projects and meetings, with our aim being to transform exploration into action.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 228. What is Writing?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cecilia Infante (ceciliai@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Do you feel that your first-year writing course prepared you to write for all your courses or your summer internships? Are you interested in exploring writing as it is practiced in a variety of academic and professional situations? What is Writing invites students to develop their writing skills and to expand their understanding of writing by introducing them to the differing stylistic conventions that govern the practice of writing across the curriculum and in the workplace.

Our lecture series features an interdisciplinary team of student-nominated faculty and alumni, recognized for their innovative approach to teaching and their dedication to undergraduate education. These faculty will discuss how writing varies from discipline to discipline from statistics to history to journalism to health care and beyond as they illustrate the expectations and standards that faculty in their field hold for students' writing. Discussion sections will give students the hands-on opportunity to experiment with each style of writing, equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need and to make appropriate rhetorical choices when writing for a variety of professional and academic contexts.

This course also will prepare students for their upper-level writing requirement because they will bring with them a critical understanding of the relationship between a discipline's rhetorical features and epistemic assumptions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

LHSP 229 / ENGLISH 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott J Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/english/229/001.nsf

See English 229.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LHSP 229 / ENGLISH 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Patrice Marie Rubadeau

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/english/229/002.nsf

See English 229.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LHSP 299(200). Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lloyd Hall Scholars Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

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