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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 5:31 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Sociology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Sociology.


SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Marie Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 300. Seniors must elect Soc. 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 195 or 300 (or 400). No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/100/001.nsf

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence. The second is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Karen S Honeycutt

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 300. Seniors must elect Soc. 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 195 or 300 (or 400). No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/100/012.nsf

Sociology is the systematic study of human behavior, social relationships, and societies. This course will introduce the "sociological perspective" as a tool for understanding the connections between the individual's everyday life and larger-scale processes and structures within society. We will focus particularly on various explanations for social inequality in the U.S. and empirical research about such inequality. Specifically, we will examine how social class, race-ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc., shape our lives and our social institutions.

What you should expect to get out of this course is a critical perspective on social life. You should be prepared to grapple with some issues you've never thought about before (or at least have never thought about sociologically before); be prepared to deal with value judgments, slippery concepts, and some ambiguity. Course requirements include three exams (20% each), two "sociological projects" (20% total), and attendance and participation at the weekly discussion section (20%).

NOTE THAT THIS IS SECTION *012*. THE LINK BELOW WILL TAKE YOU TO SECTION 001, SO TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, SCROLL DOWN TO SECTION 012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen S Honeycutt

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 300 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/101/001.nsf

How is our behavior influenced by others? How do we influence others' behavior? These questions are at the heart of social psychology. In this course, we will examine social behavior as a product of the interaction between and among individuals and groups. Topics to be covered include socialization, social relationships among groups, communication, social attitudes and attributions, the social nature of the self, attitudes and behavior, conformity, helping, close relationships, aggression and conflict, social power, and issues of inequality. Course requirements include three in-class exams (20% each), two or three short papers (total 20%), and attendance and ACTIVE participation at lecture and a weekly two-hour discussion section (20%). The textbook is James A. Wiggins, Beverly B. Wiggins, and James VanderZanden, Social Psychology, fifth edition (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994). A course pack is also required; it will be available at Accu-Copy in early January.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 001 – Sociology of Women's Health.

Instructor(s): Sheila Marie Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/105/001.nsf

Women's health issues currently exact multidisciplinary attention from a broad spectrum of fields, including sociology. This course offers a life-course perspective on women's health from a medical sociological stance, followed by an examination of gender-specific, health-related issues. An initial socio-historical examination of women's health and ancient women healers is followed by health-related topics for women in youth, as young adults, in midlife, and as women of age. Women's health issues covered in the second half of the course include inequalities in medical treatment and research, the medicalization of beauty, eating disorders, mental illness, violence and abuse, and sexuality. Students also are given an opportunity for in-depth research on issues of women's health which are pertinent to their academic and/or personal lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 110 / SI 110. Introduction to Information Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frost

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The vaulted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, Net games and dotcomes. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize these lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?) to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-shrinking and knowledge- building technologies such as telephones?), to the practical (what are the basic archetectures of computing and networks?) Successful completion of this gateway course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to become conversant with the analytical tools needed for the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of more traditonal disciplines, be conversant with the politics of information, the cultural and social frames constructed by various IT procedures and environments, and the ontologies of knowledge implicit in the information revolution. They should be ready to take arange of diverse advanced courses, addressing anything from computer-aided design to social statistics.

A key component of the course will encompass group projects on analytical topics, using group[ware and collaboratopn software to facilitate collective work and lerning. For example, a group might examine the delima of "privacy" versus "security" in the context not only of encryption technology and its inherent costs but also of the impacts on"cognitive communities" and their dependence on a relatively free flow of information–while also keeping crediting of new knowledge legally located with specific individuals. By contrast, another group could study the use and abuse of ambiguity in social relations mediated by IT infastructures, for example, how ambiguity in a chat environment can liberate people from preconceptions of lookism, racism, and prejudices toward handicaps, yet how it can also facilitate fraud and seduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 111 / UC 111 / NRE 111 / AOSS 172. Introduction to Global Change II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/

See University Courses 111.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

See Psychology 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 - Permission of Instructor

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 001 – Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender in the Contemporary World. (4 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jayati Lal (jlal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/202/003.nsf

This course examines the inequities of race, class, and gender, with a focus on the United States in a global context. We will review sociological approaches to social inequality: are race, class, and gender seen as individual attributes or as structural phenomenon? Are they theorized independently or is their intersectionality acknowledged? In addition to studying the social history of inequality, we will read individual biographical accounts of the experiences of being classed, raced, and gendered subjects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Azumi Ann Takata (takata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stats. 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/210/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to statistics for students in sociology and other social sciences with no previous experience with statistics. We will cover descriptive statistics for one and two variables, basic theories behind making statistical inferences, and inferential statistics. Emphasis is on understanding the techniques and applying them in social science research situations. Basic knowledge of high school algebra is assumed; some statistical analyses using computers will be used.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 212 / GERMAN 212. Sports and Society.

Section 001 – Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has obtained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of the passing century. There can be simply no doubt that team sports, as forms of mass culture, have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Why did American culture allow four sports (baseball, football, basketball, and hockey) to flourish simultaneously, while soccer alone prevailed in Germany? Why has the "sports map" remained so stable throughout an otherwise volatile century? Will this stability persist in the new millennium, or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural spaces?

In answering these questions, the course will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 300(400). Sociological Principles and Problems.

Introductory courses

Section 001 – Modern Social Change.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For juniors, seniors, and graduate students with no background in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 100 or 195. (3). (SS). (Introductory course).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to sociology through the study of modern social change. For the purposes of this course, the notion of social change is construed broadly to comprise both emergent societal change and changes effected by such actors as states and social movements. The course will cover sociological theories of modernity and modern social change, as well as empirical research on social change in specific societal spheres, periods, and contexts. Political and economic development, urbanization, colonialism and post-colonialism, state socialism and post-socialism, changes in family structure, progressive and anti-modern social movements, and globalization are among the topics likely to be covered in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen S Honeycutt

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or AAS; AAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/303/001.nsf

What is the meaning of race in the contemporary U.S.? This is the central question that will inform our discussions in this course throughout this term.

In the first third of the term, we will briefly review the four major "waves" of immigration to this country: the first, composed mostly of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-1800s; the second, Southern and Eastern Europeans from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, as well as some Asian immigrants during the same period; the third was the movement from the South to the North of African-Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth, from 1965, is still going on and largely consists of immigrants from Latin America and Asia. We will pay particular attention to the historical context in which these groups came to and/or moved within America and what that context meant for their success (or lack thereof).

In the second third of the term, we will examine the connection between race and some major social institutions: work & the economy, education, the family, and medicine & health. This will be followed by three classes with "open" topics chosen by the class as a whole.

In the last third of the term, we will take a sociological look at some contemporary issues of race and ethnicity in the U.S.: race and ethnic relations, English-only laws, immigration policy, debates about the relative significance of race and class, affirmative action, and the new challenges of multicultural identities & the future of race in America.

Throughout the term, we will be attentive to the intersections among race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, age, and other "social identities" in shaping our individual lives, our interactions with others, our social institutions, and our society as a whole.

Course requirements will include exams, papers, and attendance and ACTIVE participation at lecture and a weekly one-hour discussion section.

The textbook will be a collection of readings in a LARGE course pack, which will be available at Accu-Copy the first week of January.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): John Lie

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the history and problems that racial minorities have faced in the U.S. by surveying the experiences of groups such as African Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and Asians. The social history of the groups is discussed as well as the social problems confronting it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 304 / AMCULT 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret R Somers (peggs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 405. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/305/001.nsf

An introduction to various problems in the analysis of social organization as they are treated in the works of several seminal figures in sociological thought. The course will ask how these thinkers accounted for the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization, and how they accounted for social change. In the context of this analysis the student will be introduced to various accounts and uses of such theoretical concepts as structure, function, norm, power, solidarity, integration, differentiation, communication, stratification, adaptation to environment, social control and deviance. Attention will also be given to the way in which the organizational concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Upper-Level Writing Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~yuxie/soc310/

This course teaches the main basic research methods used by social scientists: observation, survey, experimentation, and statistics. It demonstrates the logic (as well as the "illogic") of reasoning in social science. You will learn how to use the computer for statistical analysis and word processing. Evaluation is based on four quizzes (40%) and four research projects (60%). You should be prepared to take computer labs. Prior knowledge of computers and popular software's (such as Microsoft Word and Excel) is helpful but not required. The research projects will be based on real data that have already been collected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 320 / PSYCH 310. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruby L Beale , Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

See Psychology 320.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 311.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Students must simply register for the course through Wolverine Access (on overrides will be issued)

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

See Psychology 311.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 5 Waitlist Code: 5; Students must get permission through the Intergroup Relations Program in 3000 Michigan Union ( 936-1875)

SOC 330. Population Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sela V Panapasa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/330/001.nsf

This course focuses on a selection of population issues that relate to social and economic problems. Some time at the start of the course is spent reviewing the overall world demographic situation and basic demographic measures. Causes of change in population growth rates and the consequences of population change for individuals and society also are considered. The course has an international focus. Much of the material relates to the Third World; some topics relate specifically to the United States. Students are expected to master a modest amount of technical material, learn some basic demographic facts and concepts, and develop an understanding of the major viewpoints and theories concerning the population problems covered. Students are encouraged to develop a critical perspective on why certain population trends become defined as problems and why analysts disagree on the existence and nature of these problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 331. Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): W Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/331/001.nsf

In this course, the methods of modern social science and demography are used to analyze the causes and consequences of those large scale social and economic changes now occurring in the United States. There is an emphasis upon population trends as both the causes and consequences of social and economic change.

Aims of the Course:

  • To develop an understanding of the causes and consequences of those major social and economic trends that are now reshaping the United States with an emphasis upon population trends as both a cause and consequence of large scale change.
  • To provide training about the quantitative analysis of contemporary social, economic and demographic trends using data from the Public Use Microdata Samples of the Censuses of 1980 and 1990.

Note: This course does not presume that you have had prior training using computers for social science research or a statistics course. The training you will need will be presented in the computer sessions. You will become familiar with the presentation and analysis of social science data as well as with several statistical procedures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Marie Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/344/001.nsf

Sociology 344 will provide a sociological examination of marriage and family life. The course will consider the meaning of marriage and family life and the ways that these social institutions are embedded within the larger social system. Of particular importance are the ways in which marriage and family systems intersect with, define, and are defined by the social and economic structures of society. The course will study various dimensions of marriage and family patterns, including structures, processes, relationships, and changes. The course will examine the ways in which family structures and relationships are influenced by social, economic, and personal forces and how family structures and processes, in turn, influence personal and social life. Several main aspects of marriage and family life will be investigated: kin relationships and household structure; division of labor and authority; courtship and mate selection; union formation and dissolution; and childbearing. Both historical and comparative perspectives on these marriage and family issues will be considered. A text book is typically required. Grading is based on a combination of exams and essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity

All students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course_PC.html PRIOR to registering for a Soc 389 Project Community section. Questions and overrides must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

Sociology 389 is known as Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving.

Students enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project.

NOTE: All sections of Sociology 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

WL:2. If a particular section is full, please e-mail Mark Chesler(seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

Section 003 - Homeless Outreach Program. (3 credits).
Section 004 - LUCY. (3 credits).
Section 005 - High School Tutoring. (3 credits).
Section 006 - COORDINATING K-12 TUTORING PROGRAMS. (3 credits).
Section 007 - MENTORING MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS. (3 credits).
Section 008 - THURSTON ELEMENTARY ENRICHMENT. (3 credits).
Section 009 - LAWTON ELEMENTARY ENRICHMENT. (3 credits).
Section 010 - ANN ARBOR: PITTSFIELD ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 011 - AMERICA READS: ISSUES IN LITERACY. - 2 CREDITS.
Section 012 - DETROIT: AFTER SCHOOL OPPORTUNITY CENTER. (4 credits).
Section 013 - DETROIT: HARDING ELEMENTARY. (4 credits).
Section 014 - DETROIT: VETAL SCHOOL. (4 credits).
Section 015 - DETROIT: LATINO/A YOUTH MENTORS. (4 credits).
Section 016 - SCARLETT MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 017 - FORSYTHE MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 018 - HOPE MEDICAL PROGRAM TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 019 - KCP: COMMUNITY OUTREACH. (3 credits).
Section 020 - SOS AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 021 - UM HOSPITAL: MOTT/WOMEN'S. (3 credits).
Section 022 - UM HOSPITAL: ADULT SERVICES. (3 credits).
Section 023 - GLACIER HILLS: RETIREMENT COMMUNITY. (3 credits).
Section 024 - UHS MEDIA CAMPAIGN. (3 credits).
Section 025 - HIV/AIDS EDUCATION. (3 credits).
Section 026 - SAFE HOUSE: WOMEN. (4 credits).
Section 027 - SAFE HOUSE: CHILDREN. (4 credits).
Section 028 - OZONE HOUSE. (4 credits).
Section 029 - FEMINIST MENTORS. (3 credits).
Section 030 - PRISON MULTICULTURAL DIALOGUE. (3 credits).
Section 031 - DETENTION CENTER: WRITING TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 032 - DETENTION CENTER: RECREATION. (3 credits).
Section 033 - TRAINING SCHOOL: RECREATION. (3 credits).
Section 034 - JAIL: CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 035 - W. WAYNE CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (4 credits).
Section 036 - ADRIAN PRISON CREATIVE WRITING. (4 credits).
Section 037 - ADRIAN/W WAYNE PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 038 - Jackson Prison Debate. (3 credits).
Section 039 - TBA. (3 credits).
Section 040 - ANN ARBOR TENANTS UNION. (3 credits).
Section 041 - EMPOWERMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (3 credits).
Section 042 - URBAN AGRICULTURE (HUNGER ACTION COALITION). (3 credits).
Section 043 - MCSP-MENTORING MIDDLE SCHOOL ATHLETES. (4 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 393 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / POLSCI 396. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 – The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe. Meets with REES 397.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery (verdery@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/rees/396/001.nsf

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 397. Junior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 210; prior or concurrent enrollment in Soc. 310 or 512; and Honors standing in sociology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is the first in a three-course sequence designed to help students to write an Honors thesis in sociology. All three academic terms are very work-intensive, but particularly this first one. In this course, students will:

  1. review the literature in their area of interest
  2. construct a sociological research question about their topic
  3. design a methodology to collect data toward answering that question
  4. write a prospectus that outlines the project
  5. find a faculty member who will mentor them throughout the project.

This course is organized primarily as a workshop to help students accomplish all of these tasks. This course is also meant to help students improve their social science writing skills and to become comfortable with the process of writing. Finally, the course requires students to do a lot of work independently.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 399. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in Sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

hopwood-eligible course

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objective is preparation of a significant research paper. Possible projects are canvassed in fall seminar meetings; students then do research under a faculty member until March; papers are presented to the seminar for criticism in the Spring.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 401. Contemporary Social Issues III.

Introductory courses

Section 001 – Race, Class and Social Policy.

Instructor(s): David R Harris (drharris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.allharris.com/soc401.html

This course focuses on definitions and consequences of race and class in American society. Throughout we will pay close attention to how existing social policies affect racial and class inequalities, as well as what alternative policies might be pursued. Topics will include: the new census race categories, affirmative action, welfare reform, wealth, and the digital divide. The format of the class will be a combination of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 428. Contemporary China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Xiaogang Wu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 100, 195, or 300. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course gives a survey of post-1949 Chinese society, focusing on the social change since 1978. The course is structured not as a historical chronology, but rather as a thematic discussion of some major issues in socialist China. We will explore the basic institutional make-up of Chinese society, the structural changes brought forth in the reform era, and how these institutions configure social life in China.

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SOC 429. Social Institutions of Modern Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Azumi Ann Takata (takata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology, anthropology, political science, or economics. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/429/001.nsf

This term, we will focus on institutions of Japanese business and labor. We will begin with an overview of business and economic conditions in Japan. In the first half of the course, we will examine aspects of Japanese business, such as company structure, subcontracting relations, distribution networks, corporate groups, government relations, and globalization. In the second part, we will take up issues in Japanese labor, such as transition from school to work, hiring and promotion, compensation, training, and gender/race issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Rudd (erudd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why distinguish between sex and gender? Is gender just about women? What does the distinction between men and women have to do with families, economies, states, and social change? How does gender shape major social institutions? In this course, students will gain tools for asking and answering questions like these through close readings of influential gender theorists such as literary critic Toril Moi and sociologists Evelyn Nakano-Glenn and R.W. Connell, studying empirical research which applies a "gender lens," and engagement with representations of gender in dance, song, and film. The course strives to inspire students to think broadly and creatively about gender as embedded in everyday life, enabling and constraining social interactions, and structuring organizations and institutions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 454. Law and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 458. Sociology of Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the purposes and roles of schooling in society. We will explore issues of socialization, stratification, the social organization of schools and classrooms, and the uses of both formal and hidden curriculums. We will examine issues of inequality, race, class and gender, cultural transmission and social change. We also will explore the role and experience of participants in schooling. Finally, we will examine contemporary issues in schools and possibilities for change in schools and change in society. Students are expected to be active participants in discussions and presentation of class readings and topics. There will be one short paper and a take-home exam. Students also will be expected to devote considerable time and effort to a research paper on some aspect of school change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 – Labor and Global Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eian/Soc460syllabus.pdf

How is the global economy changing and why? What do these changes imply for workers and their organizations in the global North and South, and how are they responding to the challenges and opportunities created by the current model of economic globalization? Will any of the leading proposals for the reform of trade, labor law, and immigration policies make a positive difference for workers? If so, which ones and why? This course explores these questions, paying special attention to the experience of workers, and the strategies of governments, corporations, and unions, in the USA and Mexico. During Winter break, there will be an optional field trip to the maquiladora city of Nogales, Mexico. Financial support for students who go on the field trip will be provided by the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations' Labor and Global Change Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 463 / COMM 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001 – Meets with Comm 485.002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 463 / COMM 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 002 – Meets with Comm 485.002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 465 / PSYCH 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/soc/465/001.nsf

The course will examine how people become social deviants and how relevant social institutions contribute to this process. Early portions will examine the legal enforcement, judicial, and corrections systems which together determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. Later portions will focus on particular forms of deviance (e.g., delinquency, theft, fraud, rape) with a view to understanding and evaluating the several theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their genesis and perpetuation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 472 / PSYCH 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Sections 001, 002 ONLY satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stats. 350 (or 402) and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/psych/381/001.nsf

See Psychology 381.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 481. Senior Seminar: Interaction Processes.

Section 001 – Interaction Processes: The Self in Social Encounters.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an undergraduate seminar that uses a discussion format. Students are expected to participate actively in the teaching and learning processes. We will explore how the self both adapts to, and directs conduct in, social encounters. Our focus will be on encounters that take place in everyday settings where the activity of both self and others is partially guided by local social structure – e.g., by frames, rules, roles, and relationships.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 493 / GERMAN 493. The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 – Meets with Political Science 489.002.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 493.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 – Steam Engines and Computers: From Industrial Proletarians to Information Workers. (3 credits). Meets with RCSSCI 360.003 and HIST 498.002.

Instructor(s): Thomas W O'Donnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 360.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 – Sociology of Aging and the Life Course. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Duane Francis Alwin (dfa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/womenstd/483/002.nsf

The objectives of this course are to increase students' appreciation of a sociological perspective on aging and the life course. The course will introduce students to the major theories and concepts social and behavioral scientists use to describe and understand the process of aging as a social phenomenon. Topics to be covered include (among others) theories of aging, issues in the demography of aging, health and disability, successful aging, work and retirement, intergenerational support in the family, and death and dying. Upon completion of the course students will be able to describe and interpret age-related transitions; identify the contributions of a variety of disciplines (e.g., biology, sociology, psychology, anthropology, philosophy) to the study of aging; critically analyze major issues and controversies related to aging; identify major legislation and policies that affect the older population; and to access information on a range of topics connected to the study of aging.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 – Women and Work - Meets with Women's Studies 483.002 (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Laurie Morgan (morganla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

3 credit course. This course will draw on research and theory from sociology, economics, psychology, anthropology, history and organizational behavior to analyze a wide range of issues regarding gender and work. We will study the construction of gender through work, effects of changing technology, gendered structures of opportunity, emotion work, globalization of women's work (both through capital and labor mobility), sexual harassment, work and family, housework, gender segregation of jobs, pay inequality, and trends in paid labor force participation and attachment. The objective is that students come away from the course able to engage scholarship on these issues across different disciplines.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 496. Special Course.

Section 001 – Cnflict, Hstry & Reslotn in the Estrn Mediterranean. Meets with Soc 596.001.

Instructor(s): Taner Akcam

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered as a part of a long-term project organized by the International Institute that aims to establish a center for the Study of History, Conflict and Reconciliation in the Eastern Mediterranean. This Center would develop a unique historical and geographical perspective on the current conflicts in an area that spans from the Balkans to the Middle East. This course employs social sciences in general and history in particular to examine the conflicts in the region; it focuses primarily on the Turkish-Armenian conflict and its possible resolution while also providing an overview of the Kurdish-Turkish and Nagorno-Karabagh issues. In this new formulation, history is not employed merely as a supplementary category, but rather as an integral part of the dilemma itself. Yet the main purpose of the course is not to elaborate on 'what really happened' either, but rather to show the manner of dispute surrounding the issue. The course analyzes and demonstrates that beside history itself, the discourse on history -- how one speaks about history -- and its representation are equally important. In fact, in the above-mentioned conflicts, the historical discourse and its representation are not merely a major part of the problem, but even a new source of it. Therefore, rather than focusing on the actual events, the course examines how the issue has been/is handled and interpreted. The intent of the course is thus to seek out the possibilities of a dialogue that could eventually lead to its resolution. One of the important elements that reproduces conflict and hinders dialogue in the region is 'grounded prejudice'. Opposing groups have sustained this prejudice across time and space, and through social and cultural institutions and practices, After surveying the dynamics of each conflict, the course articulates the concept of grounded prejudice and suggest different scenarios through which it could be eliminated. The course concludes with the analysis of this grounded prejudice, thereby opening up the possibility of dialogue by creating a space in which dialogue may occur, identifying and circumventing the obstacles involved, and creating a new language through which to articulate it. The 'Insider Outsider' model is employed in particular to elucidate one of the important sources that creates of these prejudices. The course requirements include two in-class presentations and one final paper

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 521 / CAAS 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 521.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 596. Special Courses.

Section 001 – Meets with Soc 496.001.

Instructor(s): Taner Akcam

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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