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Winter Academic Term 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 5:32 PM on Fri, Mar 22, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2002 (January 7 - April 26)

Open courses in Spanish
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Winter Academic Term '02 Time Schedule for Spanish.


SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, written and oral exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 013, 014.

Instructor(s): Karen J Primorac

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:

  • Visión y Voz, Galloway-Labarca (Wiley). (Students placed in 231 have the option to buy the customized version for Spanish 231 that contains only the last two units of the book, workbook and laboratory manual).
  • Spanish 231. Course pack. Primis custom publishing (McGraw-Hill Co.)
  • Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course, and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials.

Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

TEXTS:

  1. Required:

    • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Course pack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments
  2. Recommended:

    • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of six cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the three required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
    • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
    • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 003, 004 Introduction to the Hispanic World through Cinema.

Instructor(s): Andrew Noverr (anoverr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

Using the medium of cinema, the goal of this course will be to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (Hispanic America and Spain). The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience of Hispanic history and society that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time, students will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency:

  • narrate and describe in the present, past, and future,
  • express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events
  • hypothesize about the past, future and present.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments are required (informal and formal reactions to movies and the themes presented), quizzes, oral examination, one twenty minute mini-exam and two exams (midterm and final).

Some of the movies to be presented and discussed:

  • Todo sobre mi madre
  • La lengua de las mariposas
  • La historia oficial
  • Mi familia

Use of the WWW and the Coursetools Application is a fundamental part of this course. Extensive coursework is conducted on the WWW.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 007, 008, 012 Business Spanish.

Instructor(s): Betina Schlossberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The objective of the course is to be able to manage in the business world and to understand the cultural differences between the U.S. and the Hispanic world and among the different Spanish speaking countries.

The course will expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the cultural aims of the course while developing the grammatical functions and notions necessary to perform appropriately in business situations.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments and active participation are required, two exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentation, final paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 015 Medieval Spain: A Crucible of Cultures.

Instructor(s): Elena Catro-Gerpe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The debate over multiculturalism is one of the main concerns of the postmodern world. Questions about tolerance towards diversity have increased tremendously over the last decades, as a consequence of the massive migratory movements from certain countries to others. But the story of different people living together is not something new. In this course we will explore the coexistence of Jewish, Muslims and Christians in the context of Medieval Spain. We will study the way these peoples lived together, their daily lives and traditions, the Arabic and Jewish contribution to European culture and science, their artistic legacy, as well as the social conflicts and the growing religious intolerance that eventually caused the forced conversion and expulsion of Jews and Muslims. This context will provide us with an opportunity to reflect on issues of tolerance and respect to the Others, using the past as a tool for understanding the present and hopefully, for creating a better future.

The practice and application of grammatical functions and vocabulary will be integrated in the content of the course. Materials will be provided in a coursepack and requirements will include active class participation, quizzes, homework, compositions, a final project, and a final exam, both oral and written.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 019, 020 Legends of the Hispanic World.

Instructor(s): Iván D Martínez (idmartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

Surely you have heard of the Legend of The Sleepy Hollow, The Little Brave and the Medicine Woman, or William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody . In this intermediate Spanish course, however, you will be familiarized with some of the most popular legends of the Spanish-speaking world such as La Llorona, El Dorado, Los Amantes de Teruel. Through these and other fascinating legends you will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments and active participation are required, two exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentation, final paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 025, 028 Representing Lorca: Intro to Spanish Cult and Performance of his Plays.

Instructor(s): José-Luis Fernández-Garcia (kronox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The aim of this course is to motivate students to learn Spanish using plays, poems and the Spanish culture as background to put materials into context.

Most of the course content studied will reflect the world of Federico García Lorca, a well known Spanish playwright and poet. The course will expand on the significance of feelings, the life and death of the poet, analysis of his works and ultimately attempts to involve students in discussion and examination of the ideas presented.

Throughout the course one of his works, Blood Wedding, will be acted out by the students. Therefore willingness to participate in it is a must.

We will as well expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the aims of the course, that is:

  • narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  • express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events;
  • hypothesize about the future and present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 027 Survey Introduction to the Hispanic World.

Instructor(s): Ivan D Martinez (idmartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~anoverr/special/home.htm

The goal of this course is to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (South America countries) by studying various aspects of its history, social issues/problems, current and past customs. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience with Hispanic culture that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time, students will be exposed to the mayor communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency, that is, participants will:

  • narrate and describe in the present, past, and future,
  • express and support opinions,
  • express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events
  • hypothesize about the future and present.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments are required, three exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentation, final paper, and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle R Orecchio

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/270/002.nsf

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal-formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Course format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades also will be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Serafin M Coronel-Molina (scoronel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~scoronel/span270-links.html

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal-formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades also will be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Javier F Barrios

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/270/002.nsf

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal-formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades also will be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Text: Course pack : Part 1 at Excel (1117 South University) Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 Business Spanish.

Instructor(s): Maria De Lourdes Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Business Spanish 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the course is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish rammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 003 Spanish for the Medical Professions.

Instructor(s): Ann M Hilberry

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course's objective is to prepare students who will be working in medical fields to interact with the Spanish-speaking population. Students will build up their Spanish vocabulary and will hone their linguistic skills to prepare them to communicate effectively in Spanish in situations relating to the medical professions. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will require active daily participation on the part of the students as great emphasis will be placed on pair work and small group work. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a written midterm exam, and an oral final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 310. Advanced Composition and Style.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberly S Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/310/001.nsf

Students in this course will acquire an advanced understanding of grammatical structures while further developing their writing skills in Spanish. They will engage in extensive writing practice using a process approach that involves successive revisions. In addition students will acquire research skills and learn strategies for writing description, narrative, and argumentative essays. Course requirements: three essays, three exams, research paper. Course conducted in Spanish. Intended audience: Spanish concentrators and other students with significant training in Spanish language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/320/001.nsf

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Dennis D Pollard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/320/002.nsf

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Michael T Millar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/320/003.nsf

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 328. Studies in Hispanic Popular Culture.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Latin America and the movies: The local and the global in high and popular culture

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/328/001.nsf

Globalization has brought some changes to Latin American culture. Hollywood, MTV and the transnational record companies have been selling, successfully, their products in the Third World in general and in Latin America in particular in the last few years. As a consequence, there is now a series of products that incorporate elements from more than one cultural tradition. These are usually considered as hybrid cultural phenomena. We are going to study some literary and cinematographic examples of cultural hybridity that show a complex interaction between high- and low-brow cultural registers. In the case of Eva Peron and La novela de Perón, we will see how Argentinean recent history has been told by and independent filmmaker and a novelist, while in cases like Death and the Maiden, Gringo viejo, and Kiss of the Spiderwoman we will be confronted with "serious literature" works that have been appropriated by Hollywood. We will also deal with movies such as Erendira and The House of Spirits which allow us to study in detail the fate of Magical Realism, one of the most popular esthetic trends in 1960's and 1970's Latin America. Apartment Zero is an "art film" that relies heavily on pulp fiction tradition and The Mission is a Hollywood version of a colonial episode in Latin American history. We also will study some critics who have tried to make sense of globalization, cultural hybridity and popular culture in general, such as Néstor García Canclini, Renato Ortiz, and Jesús Martín Barbero.

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SPANISH 332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane E Marting

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine two types of the twentieth-century short story for which Spanish America has become internationally famous: (1) the surrealist or fantastic type; and (2) the testimonial type, also called the new journalism or the documentary story. We will explore why traditional realism no longer provided an adequate means of expression in the second half of the twentieth century for Latin American authors, and what short forms their new realisms took. After beginning with five famous stories on feminist themes in an anthology that provides extensive guidance on the way these stories have been understood, we then will look at two books exemplifying each kind of realism: the sur-real and the hyper-real. Two Argentines, Luisa Valenzuela and Julio Cortázar, serve as examples of the first, in which the border between reality and dream are blurred. Both express political and social views and evoke specific circumstances through humor and surprise. Our final two books unmistakably bear witness to real events transformed into literature. Elena Poniatowska, one of Mexico's most popular writers, produced the humorous and tragic stories of De noche vienes, about the relations between the sexes in terms of transgressions, peccadillos and tragedies, and in vernacular. Colombian Gabriel García Márquez, in contrast, tells the solitary adventure of a shipwrecked sailor lost at sea, and attacked by sharks. Both Poniatowska's stories and García Márquez' adventure story are based on interviews with informants and attempt to reproduce the situations on which they are based with a new verisimilitude and a sense of humor.

Evelyn Fishburn, ed., Short Fiction by Spanish-American Women.

  • Luisa Valenzuela, Aquí pasan cosas raras.
  • Julio Cortázar, Queremos tanto a Glenda.
  • Elena Poniatowska, De noche vienes.
  • Gabriel García Márquez, Relato de un naufrago.

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SPANISH 340. Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Historia y cultura españolas en el siglo XX.

Instructor(s): Ana Monica Montero (ammon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso es un recorrido por la España actual que permitirá a los estudiantes familiarizarse con la historia reciente (desde la guerra civil hasta la sociedad democrática actual), la geografía y algunas manifestaciones sociales y culturales de España (fiestas, cine, gastronomía, literatura y conflictos sociales).

La dinámica habitual de la clase incluirá numerosas actividades (análisis de textos, discusión de tópicos, búsqueda de información en prensa y web, breves presentaciones, comentario de películas y documentales, etc.). Las clases se desarrollarán en español, aunque se tendrá en cuenta la dificultad del estudiante con el idioma. Habrá dos exámenes, 2 ensayos y un proyecto final. La participación del estudiante es importante para un desarrollo óptimo del curso.

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SPANISH 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Manuel Camarero

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a reflection on contemporary Latino America by examining historical, social, and artistic aspects of Latino America, with an emphasis on contemporary Latino American society through literature, films, and essays.

Students will follow discussions in class on a variety of topics:

  • Concept of Latino America.
  • History of Latino America from pre-colonial times up to today.
  • Latinos in the United States.
  • Contemporary Latino American literature.
  • Latino American cinema, and cinema on Latino America.

    TEXTBOOKS

  • Carlos Fuentes, El espejo enterrado, México: Fondo de Cultura Económica
  • Mariano Azuela, Los de abajo, México: Fondo de Cultura Económica
  • Manuel Puig, El beso de la mujer araña, Vintage
  • Sandra Cisneros, La casa en Mango Street, Vintage

    There will be a course pack of complementary lectures by Fr. Bartolomé de las Casas, Francisco de Vitoria, Manuel Payno, Ricardo Palma, José Martí, Horacio Quiroga, Leopoldo Lugones, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar, etc.

    RECOMMENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • E. Bradford Burns, Latin America: A Concise Interpretive History
  • Giovanni Bellini, Historia de la literatura hispanoamericana, Madrid: Castalia
  • Seymour Menton, El cuento hispanoamericano, México: Fondo de Cultura Económica

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    SPANISH 350. Independent Studies.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

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    SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Aspects of the Spanish Civil War.

    Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will introduce students to the most important event of 20th century Spain. The material for the course will include readings in historical and literary texts as well as documentaries and films.

    Students will write three short papers and take a final examination.

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    SPANISH 382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE 2OTH CENTURY.

    Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course examines the main literary and cultural trends in twentieth-century Latin American poetry, narrative, and theater.  Students will become familiar with the socio-historical contexts in which major authors of this century produce their works. This course completes the panoramic view of Latin Latin American literature presented in Spanish 381.  In the first part, Continuidad y Ruptura (Rulfo, Mistral, Quiroga, Henríquez Ureña, Mariátegui, Guillén, Borges, etc.), we will devote our readings to works produced before 1960 (vanguardismos, indigenismo, narrativas revolucionarias, universo borgiano). The second half, Consolidación y Expansión (Paz, Castellanos, Fuentes, García Márquez, Poniatowska, Ferré, etc.), will focus on the literary production of the "Boom" writers (1960-75) and their influence on writers of the 1970s and 1980s (nuevos relatos, renovación teatral, éxito del 'boom').

    Reading List:

    • Burns, E. Bradford. Latin America; A Concise Interpretive History.   Englewood Cliffs,    N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1982.  6th edition.
    • Chang-Rodríguez, Raquel and Malva Filer, eds.  Voces de Hispanoamérica: Antología Literaria.   Boston: Heinle and  Heinle Publishers, 1996.
    • Franco, Jean. An Introduction to Spanish-American literature.   London: Cambridge UP, 1994. 3rd edition.
    • Skidmore, Thomas E.  Modern Latin America. New York: Oxford UP, 2000. 5th edition.

    Grading: 

    • Classwork & Participation, 20%,
    • Biweekly Reports, 20%
    • 3 Quizzes, 30%
    • Final Paper, 30%

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    SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

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    SPANISH 401(306). Workshop in Advanced Practical Spanish.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275, 276. Spanish 401 may be elected prior to Spanish 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course completes the third-year sequence of practical Spanish. It is designed to round out each student's experience in the language. Particular care is taken to develop fluency and correctness of expression.

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    SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics.

    Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/405/001.nsf

    This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish. The central part of the course introduces concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and sounds (phonology). The last third of the course examines subfields of linguistics such as pyscholinguistics (study of language acquisition) and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation).

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    SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

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    SPANISH 414 / ROMLING 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

    Other Language Courses

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard, and an overview of the linguistic situation in modern Spain. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

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    SPANISH 420 / AMCULT 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Cultural Encounters in the New World.

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/420/001.nsf

    This course explores the construction of ethnic, racial, and national identity in documentaries and fictional narrative films that portray friendly and not-so-friendly cultural encounters during periods of historical transformation in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking regions of the hemisphere. These films can be seen as forming part of the larger project of nation-building, or they can offer a critique of tensions and struggles that have been overlooked in that process. In analyzing these films, we will be considering approaches to narration and their impact on the representation of history and memory; cinematic tropes associated with (neo)colonialism; the role played by visual style in the figuration and interpretation of historical events; and the filmmakers' own positionings in relation to the state and the cultural politics of identity. Emphasis will be given to films focusing on the Brazilian and Venezuelan Amazon (including historical reconstructions of the Conquest); Good Neighbor films; urbanization and modernization in Latin America; the U.S. Southwest; and slave rebellions in the nineteenth-century Caribbean. Filmmakers include: Nelson Pereira dos Santos, Jorge Bodansky, Tomas Gutierrez Alea, Antonio Eguino, Robert Young, Nicolas Echevarria, Severo Perez, Werner Herzog, Gillo Pontecorvo, Sergio Giral, Walt Disney, Gloria Ribe, and others.

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    SPANISH 432. Gender, Writing, and Culture.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Contemporary Latin America.

    Instructor(s): Diane E Marting

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course we will explore critical concepts related to the binary of gender and its history in Spanish American literature. In class, examples from the Latin American visual arts in the twentieth-century will be compared and contrasted with the written manifestation of gender throughout the academic term. First the gender binary of fixed male and female identities will be analyzed in two short works of fiction about the female witch or outsider, whose marginalized identities fascinate or frighten. In Somers' early novella La mujer desnuda and Fuentes' short story Aura women represent the lawless wild (out)side of culture. Next we will analyze two humorous and sarcastic dramatic works by feminists, Mexican Rosario Castellanos and Puerto Rican Rosario Ferré. In these plays farce, parody and theatricality ridicule stereotypes of women writers and other women in society and in literature. In order to better conceptualize the causes of the persistence and the decadence of such clichés, we will then discuss sections of Lucía Guerra's historical and critical essay, La mujer fragmentada, and Nelly Richard's more theoretical work, Masculino/femenino. These chapters from Chilean feminists summarize much recent thought on gender in writing and culture. Finally, cultural elements the theories see as evincing untraditional views of gender, or as aiming to transcend the gender duality, will be analyzed in José Donoso's novella.

    • Rosario Castellanos, El eterno femenino.
    • Rosario Ferré, El coloquio de las perras.
    • Carlos Fuentes, Aura.
    • Armonía Somers, La mujer desnuda.
    • Nelly Richard, Masculino y femenino: prácticas de la diferencia y cultura democrática.
    • José Donoso, El lugar sin límites.

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    SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

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    SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    • What do literary critics do?
    • What have they done?
    • What can they do?
    • How is studying literature (being part of Literary Studies) different, or not, than reading literature?
    • What's the relationship between a practice called "criticism" and a feeling called "pleasure"?
    • How about between that practice and unpleasure?
    • How can writing communicate the experience of reading?
    • What's the connection between criticism and creativity?
    • Who cares about literary criticism anyway?
    • And why should they?

    In this course, we will explore these questions via a series of readings of fiction, literary criticism, and literary theory. Students should emerge from the course with: (1) an elementary understanding of the variety of practices that may constitute literary criticism as a practice; (2) an introductory glimpse into the various institutional forces that help determine what gets called literary criticism; (3) exposure to the assumptions, habits, feelings, and values of critical thinking. A great deal of writing will be required in the course, particularly in the form of regular short essays. The course will be conducted in English.

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    SPANISH 438. The Economy and Politics in Latin America/Spain.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 The Economy and Politics of Literature in Latin America.

    Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will study the symbiosis of politics, economy, and fiction in the making of modern Latin America. We will begin the course discussing the following question: How are the notions of ideology, national culture, and social formation related to a political reading of fiction? Through a careful reading of a nineteenth-century novel, we will explore the formation of national states and the organization of free trade. The course then will move on to the study of literature, national popular consciousness, and import substituting industrialization (1930-1950), and, finally, to national affirmation and transnationalization (1950-1980).

    Though students in the course do not need to have a previous background in Latin American politics and economics, they are expected to be interested in the relations between literature, politics, and economics. Course requirements will include three partial take-home exams (60%) and a final take-home (40%).

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    SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Spanish Golden Age Literature.

    Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course deals with the major writers of Spain's Siglo de Oro. We will read representative works of the major figures of the period: Fernando de Rojas, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Miguel de Cervantes, Calderón de la Barca and Lazarillo de Tormes.

    The reading of these texts will be accompanied by material on the social and economic situations of the period: the Conversos, the problem of poverty, the idealization of the pastoral world and the conflict between traditional society and the fast developing world of commerce.

    Students will write two essays and take a final examination.

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    SPANISH 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Latin America/Spain.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Literatura de la posguerra civil española.

    Instructor(s): Ana Monica Montero (ammon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    La Guerra civil española (1936-1939) fue un conflicto civil que marcó la historia, la conciencia y la expresión cultural de España durante el resto del siglo XX. Este curso comienza con una breve introducción a la historia de la Guerra civil, tras la cual se propone revisar algunas de las manifestaciones más destacadas de la posguerra: humor escapista, comics, rol de la mujer, narrativa breve, literatura de queja social, etc. Todos estos temas expresan la repercusión de la Guerra civil, su tratamiento o su ausencia. Algunos de los autores cuyo trabajo se analizará son: Francisco Ayala, Miguel Délibes, Carmen Martín Gaite, Jardiel Poncela y Camilo José Cela. La dinámica habitual de la clase incluirá el análisis de textos, la discusión de tópicos y breves presentaciones. Las clases se desarrollarán en castellano, aunque se tendrá en cuenta la dificultad del estudiante con el idioma. Habrá dos exámenes, 2 ensayos y un proyecto final. La participación del estudiante es importante para un óptimo desarrollo del curso.

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    SPANISH 472. Pre-Columbian Societies.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS: WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THEM AND HOW WE REPRESENT THEM.

    Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/winter/spanish/472/001.nsf

    This course will focus on Ancient civilizations in the Americas and how we perceive them today. One of its purposes is to give students an idea of the vast variety of indigenous cultures in pre-Columbian times, how much we know about some of them but, most of all, how much we ignore. Special attention will be paid to their subsistence patterns and social organizational principles. Another goal of this course is to analyze the ways in which we, from a Western vantage point, portray indigenous cultures.

    Inga Clendinnen's Aztecs. An Interpretation gives us the chance to focus on a study of Aztec culture before the arrival of the Spaniards. It provides us, too, with a challenging example of the pros and cons of ethnohistorical reconstruction.

    We will read Steve Stern's book on a region of the former Inca empire, Huamanga, in order to learn about the relationship between the Inca rulers and their subjects. The book also deals with the different ways in which indigenous peoples from the Andes adapted to the changes provoked by European colonization. The compilation by Malpass will shed some light on the way in which the Inca occupied the different territories they conquered. It also tells us about the advantages of a research method that combines a study of both the archaeological record and the chronicles. Michael Coe's Breaking the Maya Code is an excellent source of information about how we, contemporary scholars, view the indigenous worlds of the past. Philip Deloria's Playing Indian will help us understand how many of our conceptions about indigenous cultures are based, more often than not, on our ignorance of important facts regarding the interaction between early European settlers and Amerindians.

    A course pack will contain information about the cultures that populated the Valleys of the Rivers Ohio and Mississippi in prehistoric times. We will also read a couple of novels (The Witness, by J. J. Saer and People of the River, by W. M. Gear and K. O'Neal) and a few films (both fictional and documentary) that will give us an idea about how our society represents indigenous cultures. We are also going to watch a few movies that represent indigenous subjects and cultures, such as Hollywood Westerns and a couple of ethnographic films, as well as fragments from Pocahontas, 1492, and others.

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    SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Latin American Poetry.

    Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Qué son los sueños? Qué misterio guardan? Qué revelan sobre nuestro ser, sobre el mundo que habitamos; sobre la vida, la existencia, la realidad, el tiempo, el más allá, la muerte? Estas y similares preguntas se han planteado filósofos, poetas y místicos de todas las épocas y latitudes. En este curso estudiaremos las respuestas que cuatro autores hispánicos del siglo veinte han ofrecido a estas interrogantes de raigambre metafísico: María Zambrano (España), Humberto Díaz Casanueva (Chile), Jaime Saenz (Bolivia) y Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina). Dedicaremos la primera parte del curso al estudio de "la fenomenología del sueño y de los sueños" de Zambrano desarrollada en sus ensayos compilados en El sueño creador y Los sueños y el tiempo. En la segunda parte del curso aplicaremos la fenomenología de Zambrano al estudio de la poesía de Díaz Casanueva, Saenz y Pizarnik. Apoyándonos en la lectura cuidadosa de estos textos, conversaremos no sólo sobre las cuestiones y los planteamientos que estos autores nos ofrecen respecto al valor congnoscitivo de los sueños, sino que también reflexionaremos sobre los puntos de convergencia y divergencia que hay entre el discurso filosófico y el poético.

    El desempeño de los estudiantes será evaluado en base a su participación, dos exámenes parciales y dos trabajos escritos.

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    SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Borges as Genre.

    Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course presents an in-depth view of the works of Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986), the most influential Latin American writer of the 20th century.   Through a close reading of his most significant essays, short narratives, and poetry, this course will examine the literary inventions created by Borges vis-à-vis his literary persona, his apocryphal use of quotations and historical figures, as well as his fixation with libraries, new concepts of space and time, and "undiscovered" universes. Borges' vast production often intertwines fiction and essay, thus challenging any fixed or set genre affiliation for his oeuvre.  Borges is indeed a "genre in itself."   Given the complex nature of Borges' writings, our readings for this course will concentrate on his production between 1929 and 1972, which include the most important collections of his complete works: Fervor de Buenos Aires, Cuaderno de San Martín, Historia universal de la infamia, Ficciones, Aleph, Otras inquisiciones, and El Hacedor.

    Selected Reading List:

    • Balderston, Daniel. Borges: realidades y simulacros. Buenos Aires : Editorial Biblos, 2000.
    • Bell-Villada, Gene H.  Borges and his fiction: a guide to his mind and art. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1999.
    • Borges, Jorge Luis.  Obras completas. 4 Vols. Barcelona: Emecé, 1996 [Selection of Vols. 1 and 2]
    • Molloy, Sylvia. Las letras de Borges y otros ensayos. Rosario, Argentina: Beatriz Viterbo Editora, 1999.

    Grading: 

    • Classwork & Participation, 20%
    • 3 Short Papers, 30%
    • 2 Presentations, 20%
    • Final project,  30%

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001 Cortazar and Keats.

    Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 002 Paideia mexicana: La huella del helenismo en el México revolucionario.

    Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    [Paideia es una palabra griega que no tiene equivalente en español o en inglés. Significa, simultánea y conjuntamente, civilización, cultura, tradición, literatura y educación].

    En este curso vamos a estudiar el heleno-centrismo en la obra (literaria, filosófica, magisterial, cultural y política) de un grupo de intelectuales que tuvieron una notoria influencia en la paideia mexicana revolucionaria (1910-1940). Antonio Caso, Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Alfonso Reyes, José Vasconcelos y demás miembros del "Ateneo de la juventud" fueron los artífices de un amplio movimiento cultural en contra del positivismo (la filosofía oficial del porfiriato, 1876-1910) y a favor del humanismo (cuyo origen y fuente espiritual es la paideia griega). Estos intelectuales buscaban no sólo fomentar la cultura de las humanidades en México sino que anhelaban la realización de los ideales de la paideia griega tanto en México como en toda América Latina. Su humanismo de izquierda fue institucionalizado en México durante los gobiernos de Obregón, Calles y Cárdenas y rindió valiosos y diversos frutos en la literatura, la filosofía, las artes, la arquitectura y la educación.

    En este curso vamos a estudiar no sólo la huella del helenismo en la paideia del México revolucionario en general y en la obra de los ateneístas en particular (especialmente la de Reyes y Vasconcelos) sino que también realizaremos una evaluación crítica de los presupuestos ideológicos del heleno-centrismo transculturado que estos intelectuales abrazaron y promovieron.

    Este curso es de lectura intensiva. Habrá dos exámenes parciales en el transcurso del semestre y se pedirá un trabajo de investigación y análisis al final del semestre.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level Spanish literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

    Literary and Cultural Studies

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

    hopwood-eligible course

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    Graduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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