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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in CAAS


This page was created at 11:33 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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CAAS 103. First Year Social Science Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Malcolm X, Black Power, and the Practice of History.

Instructor(s): Stephen Ward (smward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a concentration plan. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the life and legacy of Malcolm X, considering him both as an historical figure whose ideas and actions were part of a specific historical moment, and as an iconic, almost mythical figure whose image continues to stand as a powerful symbol. Our focus will be on understanding Malcolm's influence on the Black Power movement of the 1960s and 1970s, when various organizations and individuals claimed to be carrying on his legacy. In addition, we will critically assess the ways in which his legacy continues to be constructed and used to represent that period of Black struggle. Our investigation will be guided by three broad objectives.

First, we will study Malcolm X's life leading up to his emergence as a national and international figure of Black resistance.

Secondly, we will examine the contours and depth of his activism and its relationship to the broader African American freedom movement. This will include a close look at the various ways in which his ideas and his example as a political activist dramatically impacted the emergence of the Black Power movement following his assassination in 1965.

Finally, we will analyze and interpret contemporary representations of Malcolm X in both scholarly and popular forms, allowing us to better understand his legacy and his place in narratives of African American history.

Throughout the academic term, we will take care to highlight the ways that ideas and images are used to construct historical meaning – that is, to make sense of the past and its relationship to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 104. First Year Humanities Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – The Black Arts Movement.

Instructor(s): Derrick Gilbert (derrickg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a concentration plan. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Black Arts Movement (BAM) was the cultural/artistic wing of the Black Power Movement that existed from the mid-1960s through the mid-1970s. A key concept of BAM was the development of a "Black aesthetic," as well as using art for social change ("art for peopl's sake"). In this course we will:

  • examine the historical roots of BAM; analyze the works of BAM;
  • analyze the works of BAM artist – such as Amiri Baraka, Nikki Giovanni and Sonia Sanchez; and
  • attempt to link BAM to contemporary artistic movements such as hip-hop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 108 / HISTART 108. Introduction to African Art.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jessica Levin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (African Studies). May not be included in a concentration plan. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 108.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 200(105). Introduction to African Studies.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give students an overview of the historical, political, cultural, and economic developments in sub-Saharan Africa. Contemporary Africa has been characterized by analysts in all kinds of ways: as a group of new nations with a need for development; as a collection of states with colonially-created boundaries searching for viable political frameworks for development; and as a region of the world where authoritarian political and statist economic systems are giving way to a movement toward democracy and economic liberalization. This course does not seek to be comprehensive; rather, it will provide an overview on how Africa came to be characterized in these various ways, specifically focusing on the interactions of sub-Saharan African societies with outsiders, both historically and at present. The issues of race and ethnicity, discrimination and inequality, that have been and continue to be a major element of these interactions, will be examined in this course.

The course will begin with an examination of myths and facts about Africa. This will be followed by an exploration of the African precolonial past, emphasizing African connections with other societies, through migration and trade as well as through the trans-Saharan and Atlantic slave trade. The effects of colonialism in Africa will then be examined, along the resulting nationalist movements and related postcolonial concerns and problems. Central among these problems and issues are: the centralization of power and transitions to more pluralist and participatory political systems; the shifts in strategies of development, population growth, and poverty; and the intersection of gender and race in African postcolonial societies. The aim in presenting a historical background at the outset is to provide a context for understanding the bases of these problems and issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 201(100). Introduction to Afro-American Studies.

African-American Studies

Section 001 – Women of Color in America: History, Narrative, & Identity. Meets with AMCULT 210.001 and Women's Studies 230.001.

Instructor(s): Tiya A Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/210/001.nsf

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview and introduction to the area of Afro-American Studies. Historical, political, sociocultural, and behavioral perspectives are brought to bear on the analysis of the Black American experience. Specifically, the course intends to:

  • Introduce students to the corpus of knowledge characteristic of the Afro-American Studies disciplinary perspective;
  • Consider salient issues, debates, and critiques in the area;
  • Survey the Black American experience with emphasis on current social, political, and economic developments; and
  • Encourage the development of greater insight into the Black American experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 202(200). Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies.

Afro-Caribbean Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). (R&E). (Afro-Caribbean Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Caribbean poet Lorna Goodison will teach this introductory course. Readings will include poems by Derek Walcott, V.S. Naipaul, Jean Rhys, and other Caribbean poets.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 206. Issues in African Studies.

African Studies

Section 001 – Africa's Relations with Europe and Asia.

Instructor(s): Afeworki Paulos (apaulos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines Africa's relations with Europe and Asia in antiquity and the middle ages and impact of slavery and colonialism. Africa's reaction to external forces will be discussed with special focus on pan-Africanism, nationalist movements in Africa and African literature. Issues on postcolonial Africa will be explored by focusing on topics of governance, human rights, conflict resolution, foreign relations, and linkage with the diaspora.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 001 – Economic Origins of the African Diaspora.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigate the economic origins of the African diaspora. Diaspora is problemetized as the geographic dispersion of a people and more-broadly as trans-national connections in culture, language, politics, economy, genetics and worldview. Students are introduced to the following topics: the economics of the first African diaspora some 150,000 years ago; the continent of Africa in world economic history up to 1500 A.D.; the economics of migration and colonization on the continent of Africa before 1500 A.D.; the economics of the trans-Sahara and trans-Atlantic slave trades; Africans and the rise of the Atlantic economy; and the diaspora's contribution to the modern history of freedom, revolution, and democracy.

This is not a typical lecture course. Class resources include readings, films, the Internet, guest lecturers and Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. The class will read and debate selections from classic texts (like Walter Rodney's How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, Eric Williams' Capitalism and Slavery, and Philip Curtin's The Atlantic Slave Trade) as well as more recent contributions. There are no examinations. Student performance is evaluated on the basis of weekly reading reports, class discussions, performances in debates, and the quality of an empirical research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 241 / WOMENSTD 231. Women of Color and Feminism.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Cole

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/241/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 231.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 247(448) / HISTORY 247. Modern Africa.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/247/001.nsf

See History 247.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 303 / SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/soc/303/001.nsf

See Sociology 303.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 331 / PSYCH 316. The World of the Black Child.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie J Rowley (srowley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/316/001.nsf

This course has two objectives. They are, first, to introduce key areas of research and theory related to the socialization and development of African-American children and second, to facilitate critical thinking regarding this body of research and theory. The course will focus on cultural and situational forces that affect the lives of African-American lower-and middle-class children. In order to highlight the factors that contribute to the social conditions of the African-American child, a section of the course will look at the lives of specific individuals through their personal accounts and will compare the converging and diverging features of the socialization of African-American children and South African children. Topics to be discussed will include: (1) family, peers, and community socialization; (2) the development of a sense of self and racial identification; (3) portrayal of African-American in books for children; (4) school achievement and intellectual development; (5) teenage pregnancy; and (6) welfare, poverty, and father absence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 336 / HISTORY 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in America.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As an exploration of African-American women in the twentieth century, this course seeks to consider varieties of experience – including class, sexuality, and region – as it provides an historical framework for analyzing overarching issues facing contemporary Black women in the United States. We will also discuss Black women's relationships to both interracial and broader communities. In particular, we will assess how the nexus of race, gender, and class have influenced Black women's work, activism, political involvement, and creative output. Whereas this course is structured as a history course, it takes an interdisciplinary approach to Black women's lives: readings will draw from literature, sociology, women's studies, psychology, film studies, and legal theory. The method of instruction combines lecture and discussion. Successful completion of this course is contingent upon regular attendance, active participation, and appropriate preparation for each class meeting. Additional requirements included completion of short written assignments and a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 348 / DANCE 358. Dance in Culture: Origins of Jazz Dance.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an exploration of the origins of Jazz Dance through movement, as it relates to African-American vernacular dance, the African Diaspora, and American culture as a whole, placing African-American vernacular dance right at its center and providing a broader understanding of the influence of African-American dance and its legacy within 20th-century concert dance. Starting from the early dances of enslaved Africans in the Americas to the present, this course investigates the relationship of African-American vernacular dance to jazz dance forms. Its focus in this context is the influence of African-American vernacular dance and the identification of specific movement motifs and concepts, such as rhythm, improvisation, theme, syncopation, balanced asymmetry, and body carriage, as a clear retention of African culture and rooted deeply in the African aesthetic, as evidenced in the work of George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Jerome Robbins, and Jack Cole. It will identify the commonalities of movement and aesthetics of both, as well as the sociocultural conditions that contributed to their creation and influence in American dance and culture. The course utilizes movement sequences, as well as lecture, group discussion, supplemental readings, film, and video components, to provide both an experiential and theoretical understanding of these concepts. The course also will incorporate improvisation as an essential element through the class, as a basic concept in all African Diasporic forms.

Course requirements: Studio participation and regular attendance at all lectures; reading assignments; take-home midterm; midterm choreographic phrase; final research project, and final choreographic phrase.

This course is intended for Dance majors, CAAS students, and the wider university community. Two meetings a week, 1.5 hours per session, in a format mixing lab with lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CAAS 355 / HISTORY 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 355.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Deconstructing Whiteness: Alternative Perspectives on Race, Class, & Gender.

Instructor(s): Kenneth Brown (krbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rcssci/360/004.nsf

This course will explore the history of race, class, and gender as they are represented and misrepresented in American history texts and in the culture at-large. Many revisionist historians assert that publishers and authors of high school textbooks willfully misrepresent American history in order to increase sales, quell controversy, and manufacture an adult populace that will conform to contemporary standards of "good" citizenship. Authors and publishers have a propinquity to represent American history in hyper-patriotic, feel-good pedagogy. High school textbooks in particular seldom present class conflict, urban history, immigrant history, race conflict, women's history, environmental history, or political skullduggery. Publishers of these texts are extraordinarily sensitive to historical events that may be controversial on a regional basis. The same textbook will represent American history in different ways in different parts of the country.

We will examine the "misrepresentations" in popular notions of American history and attempt to determine their political and social ramifications in a society where educators and other scholars "misinform" its citizens. Primary attention will be placed on the deconstruction of our contemporary notions of "whiteness" and how gender is reflected in this notion. Students will be required to read six short books and a few short articles, and view videos. Weekly e-mails are required. Students will also be required to lead class discussions based on the prior week's readings. The midterm assignment is an outline and annotated bibliography detailing a final research paper due at the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 – The History of Detroit in the 20th Century. Meets with RC 344.001

Instructor(s): Charlie Bright, Ward

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 344.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 – Third World Women. Meets with Women's Studies 345.001.

Instructor(s): Fadlalla

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 345.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 004 – Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to equip students, through lectures, discussions, individual and group discovery, with the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge, skills, and technique that will enable them to carry out social psychological research in the African environment. The course is aimed at the upper-level (300 & 400) undergraduate students in Psychology, African-American and African Studies, and other related social science disciplines. The principles underlying the collection of scientific research data remain the same but the cultural influence under which scientific research data are assembled must be taken into consideration if a researcher is to collect valid, reliable and research information that has external validity.

The discussion begins with examination of the status of psychology and social psychological research in Africa, factors that impede the development of psychology and social psychological research in the African setting, and the responsibilities of a social psychological researcher to the African subjects. We will also discuss the traditional African approaches to the generation of knowledge. The student will further learn how to plan psychological and social research in Africa, the use of sampling techniques in African setting, how to recruit and train field workers, interviewers, and how to obtain data that are reliable, valid, and have external validity from a non-Western population such as Africa. Finally, the course will assess the contributions of social psychological research to social change in Africa.

A textbook and Course Pack will be used for the course. Student assessment will comprise of attendance, class participation, two quizzes, and a final examination, and field research experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 005 – America's Civil Rights Movement.

Instructor(s): Joseph J. Gonzalez (joegon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~onthebus/

In this course, we will study the most successful non-violent movement for social change in American history: The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968. At times, we will learn from books and articles. Just as frequently, we will learn from experience, traveling throughout the South during spring break, visiting people and places central to the Movement. During previous trips, we have met Coretta Scott King, Julian Bond, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and Bob Moses, to name a few, and visited places from the Mississippi Delta to Washington, DC. During "Get on the Bus," you will learn both academically and experientially.

The course is divided into three parts. In January and February, we will read secondary and primary sources of the Civil Rights Movement. During spring break, we will travel the South, visiting the people and places about which we have read. After our return, we will consider not only the historical origins of African-American resistance to racism, but also the Civil Rights Movement's legacy in issues such as affirmative action, racial profiling, and capital punishment.

During the academic term, you will write two significant, formal essays in two drafts, one before the trip, one at the term's end. You will also write informal response papers every week, reflecting on each week's readings. For a look at our three previous trips, visit our web site at http://www.umich.edu/~onthebus/. Make sure that you register for the one-credit trip [insert course number] at the same time as you register for the three-credit course.

Come join us. It will be a course and a trip that you will not soon forget.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 006 – Mapping Paris through America and Africa. Meets with French 331.001.

Instructor(s): Alain Mabanckou

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Paris as the metropole has always fascinated everybody because so many of us are postcolonial subjects. Through their gaze and understanding of this city as the center, African and American writers have in their different ways critiqued the centralization of the French culture which excludes them culturally and literally. We will explore in this course the extent to which approaching this exclusion has actually been mediated through artistic creation.

Thus, in this course we will study works by African (such as Bernard Dadié ) and American artists (such as James Baldwin ) which discuss Paris as the site of hegemonic discourse. The goal is mapping the silenced relationship between Paris, Africa, and America. We will also analyze the way in which African, American, and French cultures are actually in opposition with each other while simultaneously being complementary.

REQUIRED TEXTES:

  1. An African in Paris, (Novel) by Bernard Dadié
  2. Giovanni's Room, (Novel) by James Baldwin

FILMS:

  1. The American President in Paris
  2. La Noire de…
  3. The Kiss of the Dragon

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 361. Comparative Black Art.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Lockard (jmlockaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 360. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of CAAS 360, this accelerated course provides an interdisciplinary overview of Afro-American culture and art. CAAS 361 develops further information and dialogue for a closer examination of the interrelationship of the arts, and of how they influence and are influenced by society. The approach continues to be interdisciplinary, and Afrocentric. The Afro-American cultural experience and its various forms of existence and encounters are brought under close scrutiny in a variety of contexts: these will range from the historical and political to the philosophical, the religious, and the aesthetic. In the process, this course also examines the relationship of West African cultures to both South and North American insistencies. The course also recognizes and will examine the controversies surrounding the impact of the Afrocentric aesthetic on Western culture and lifestyles. Slides, films, and guest appearances will supplement lectures. But this course also is designed to be interactive and communal and to create opportunities for students to strengthen their skills and establish a clearer, more substantial concept of identity, focus, and direction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 394. Junior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – The Abolition and Aftermath of Slavery in the Americas.

Instructor(s): Julius Scott III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores in a comparative framework the abolition of slavery in several American plantation societies, with particular focus on the United States. It examines such issues as how and why slavery ended, the transition to economies based on free labor and the various outcomes of that process, and where emancipation fits within the broader context of Black Atlantic history. Throughout, we will pay special attention to the ways in which African Americans, whether in Haiti at the turn of the nineteenth century, in the British Caribbean in the 1830's and 1840's, in the southern United States in the 1860s', or in Cuba and Brazil in 1870s and 1880s, experienced slavery's demise and in turn struggled to shape the post emancipation period. In the process, we will be forced to confront basic assumptions about "freedom" that remain at the core of our society more than a century after the last American slave system was abolished in 1888.

Readings for the course include monographs covering a variety of American societies as well as a set of primary source documents dealing with emancipation in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 396 / ENVIRON 396 / NRE 396. History of Environmental Thought and Activism.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Meets with NRE 596.001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/396/001.nsf

See Environment 396.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 400 / MUSICOL 457. The Musics of African Americans.

African-American Studies

Section 001 – Meets with CAAS 557.001.

Instructor(s): Travis A. Jackson (travieso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. Musical background preferred. Undergraduates only. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/musicol/457/001.nsf

See Music History and Musicology 457.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 405 / ANTHRARC 400. Field Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (8). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Anthropological Archaeology 400.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 406 / ANTHRARC 401. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in CAAS 405. (6). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Anthropological Archaeology 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (CAAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CAAS 418 / POLSCI 324. Black Americans and the Political System.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 324.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 422 / ANTHRCUL 411. African Culture.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 442 / FILMVID 442. Third World Cinema.

Afro-Caribbean Studies

Section 001 – Third World Cinema.

Instructor(s): Frances K Gateward (gateward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). (Afro-Caribbean Studies). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 442.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 and 450 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/451/001.nsf

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453. African-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Space, Arch & AfrAmer Identity. [3 Credits]. Meets with American Culture 498.001 and ARCH 409.053

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska, Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/498/001.nsf

See American Culture 498.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 – Comparing Black Aesthetics: Black Drama and Theatre in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. Meets with Theatre 4040.001.

Instructor(s): Dieudonné-Christophe Mbala Nkanga

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be devoted in exploring the major developments in the aesthetic experience of Black Drama and Theatre in the U.S., the West Indies, and Africa. Through the reading of plays (some in class) and critical materials, viewing videos and films, students will consider, question, and compare the experience of domination, colonialism, post-colonialism, and emancipation of the Black people in this geographical space as expressed by various playwrights and artists of African descent over the last fifty years. The playwrights in consideration for this course are: Ama Ata Aidoo, Amiri Baraka, Aime Cesaire, Sony Labou Tansi, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, and August Wilson.

In addition to these playwrights, students will question essays and other critical and historical materials by writers such as DuBois, Asante, Appiah, Gates, Soyinka, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, and Jeyifo, as they pertain to Blackness and its expression. The course will combine historical perspectives and theatre and performance criticism approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 – SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA.

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When economists discuss the development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. "The Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa" is a seminar course that is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development.

Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 005 – Higher Education and African-American Social Development in the 21st Century.

Instructor(s): Larry Rowley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/458/005.nsf

This course is an upper-division undergraduate elective that will examine selective aspects of higher education and its relationship to the African-American community. Emphasis will be given to the role that higher education has historically played in the social, economic, and political development of African Americans with a view toward its role in the twenty-first century. American higher education will be examined primarily as a major social institution that continues to grapple with the difficult issues of race. The required text will provide the broad contours of the course and the conceptual framework for analyzing and exploring the social function of higher education. These texts will be supplemental with journal articles and excerpts from other books that deal with several major issues that are currently of concern to African Americans in higher education (e.g., issues of race and wealth, affirmative action, standardized testing, and urban educational challenges).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 006 – Reproductive Health, Gender, and Politics in Africa: A Southern Africa Perspective. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Shingairai Feresu (sferesu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/458/006.nsf

This course will consider reproductive health of women, gender inequalities, and politics of health in Africa with a special focus on Southern Africa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 007 – Blacks, Indians & Making of America. Meets with AMCULT 496.004.

Instructor(s): Tiya A Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 496.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 476 / ENGLISH 478. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

African-American Studies

Section 001 – Black Narrative and the Politics of Mobility. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor required.

CAAS 489 / ENGLISH 479. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

African-American Studies

Section 001 – The Slave Narrative. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201, 274 and/or 338 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 479.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Remembering Babylon: Caribbean/Canadian Writing [African Diaspora]. Meets Jan 15-Feb 19. [1 credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Michael Bucknor (mikebuck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the ways in which Afro-Caribbean cultures mark inter-national/diasporic spaces.

For Marlene Nourbese-Philip,

"when the African came to the New World she brought with her nothing but her body and all the memory and history which [provided] all the tools necessary for spiritual and cultural survival" ("Managing the Unmanageable" 298).

It is not surprising, then, that

"African and, later, Caribbean peoples, [uprooted] from their past, have had to rely on their body-memories and on a performative oral tradition that initiates recall of their cultural heritage . . . . Ritual performance in song, dance, oral story-telling has been the main means of recovering and preserving those memories stored in the body" (Bucknor "Body-vibes" 309).

By examining the literary text as a material embodiment of cultural practice, the course will allow us to trace the ways in which Caribbean/Canadian writing inserts an African presence in Canada. In this half course, we will pay particular attention to the performative resources of Afro-Caribbean culture that are used as "tools of survival" in the Babylons of past home countries and present host societies. The term "Babylon" is retrieved from Rastafarian "Dread Talk" and is the archetypal trope that describes oppressive regimes predicated on hegemony. Babylonian hegemonies related to race, class, culture, gender, and sexuality are interrogated using these African-diasporic traditions. Both Barbadian/Canadian Austin Clarke (who chronicles the experience of the domestic workers who came to Canada in the 1950s in his pioneering novel, The Meeting Point) and Jamaican/Canadian Lillian Allen (who uses her dub poetry collection, Women Do This Everyday, to focus on issues affecting Caribbean women in the diaspora) employ the African-diasporic oral/expressive resources to "chant down" Babylons past and present. This course, with an emphasis on Afro-Caribbean retention, comparatively examines the performative structures of two writers of the Caribbean and demonstrates the significant impact of Afro-Caribbean cultural expressions on other diasporic cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 – Modern African Diaspora in Western Cities. March 5-April 2 [1 Credit]. [Drop/Add deadline=March 11].

Instructor(s): Charles Tshimanga-Kashama (ckashama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the history of the Modern African diaspora in European and North American cities. The objective of the course is to analyze the Modern African diaspora in several major cities – Paris, Brussels, Charlotte (North Carolina) – and explore its complexity and the many strategies African youth have adopted to recreate their imagined communities. Special emphasis is put on the emergence of African popular cultures in these cities. The dress codes of these youth, their recreative activities, popular music, and linguistic fabrications are intriguing phenomena that open new stimulating perspectives for historical inquiry. They help us to understand the different aspects of the global African diaspora. The course will be run as a seminar, with group discussions freely mixed with short lectures, guest lecturers, film discussions, and brief student presentations.

Required Texts:

  • Scott, James. 1990. Domination and the Arts of Resistance, New Haven-London: Yale University Press.
  • Okpewho, Isidore – Boyce Davies, Carole & Mazrui Ali. 1999. The African Diaspora. African Origins and New World Identities. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

Films: Mobutu, Roi du Zaïre (Mobutu, King of Zaire) and Pièces d'identité (ID card).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 495. Senior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 – Race in the City and American Culture.

Instructor(s): Lori Brooks (llbrooks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (Capstone Course). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/495/001.nsf

This research seminar is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of urban culture and the representation of the city in American culture. Beginning with the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago and ending with the 1992 L.A. riots, the course emphasizes the transition from a utopic (though ambivalent and racist) view of the city and urban life in the late 19th century to a harshly racialized and apocalyptic view by the end of the 20th century. The course will be shaped by themes such as the racialization of urban space, the gendering and racialization of poverty, cultural articulations of ghetto life, and the production and consumption of cultural forms such as hip hop and urban graffiti. Course texts will include historical studies, urban sociology, autobiography, novels, music, film, and studies of urban design. We will read texts by a variety of thinkers, including W.E.B. Du Bois, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Claude Brown, David Zucchino, Joe Austin, and Tricia Rose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 495. Senior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 – Critical Race Theory: American Legal Culture & Construction. Meets with History 477.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (Capstone Course). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/495/002.nsf

This course will explore Critical Race Theory, an intellectual movement that has sought to reexamine the terms by which race and racism have been understood in the American consciousness. Through readings in law, history, literature and the social sciences, as well as through autobiography and film, students will explore the ways in which race and power are constructed and represented in American legal culture, and more generally, in American society as a while. We will investigate the connections between race and other social markers such as gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity through a consideration of queer theory, whiteness studies, and Latina/o critical theory. Also central to Critical Race Theory is its mobilization as a political intervention aimed at changing the relationship between race and power in American culture. Thus, we will consider concepts of neutrality and objectivity, activism and social change, and their relationship to scholarship and the production of knowledge. Students will be evaluated based upon contribution to class discussion and completion of a research project with final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 004 – Meaning & Representation AfricanAmerican Music &Culture. MEETS WITH AMCULT 699.002.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 699.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 007 – Anthropology of Music. Meets with Anthro 558

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 558.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for CAAS.


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