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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 11:34 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements. May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/101/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology and biological anthropology. It emphasizes a set of fundamental concerns: the nature of culture, human variation and universals, cultural relativism and how knowledge of evolution and pre-history inform our understanding of what it means to be human. Specific topics include: primate (monkey and ape) behavior, evolution and the concept of race; the origins of agriculture and the rise of social complexity; language and culture, kinship and family, sex and gender roles, ethnicity, and religion; and the emergence of the world system, culture and political economy, and globalization. This course is intended to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures and intellectual methods that characterize the discipline. It stresses the unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students new ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity and to think critically. Required readings include an introductory text and several paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (primarily multiple choice), each covering one-half of the term; the second exam will be given on the final day of class. Section leaders require several short papers (no more than ten pages total) and other brief assignments or quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements. May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/101/026.nsf

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There will be four short papers due in section, and section leaders may have other requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 222. The Comparative Study of Cultures.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/222/001.nsf

Culture is frequently offered as an explanation as to why people differ from each other. Yet, does culture determine how people think and act? This course explores how aspects of social life are organized and understood in non-Western and Western societies, and asks how meaning is constructed historically in the context of large-scale forces. Topics which will be considered include race, gender, religion, personhood, and anthropological ethics and human rights. Readings will center on in-depth studies of particular communities as well as on controversies surrounding certain topics. The texts include studies of an indigenous Andean community, Afro-Caribbean spiritual practices, healing beliefs among Hmong immigrants, and social transformation among Amazonian indigenous peoples. Classes will be organized around the discussion of texts, films, and supplementary materials, and will include student group presentations. Students are expected to attend regularly and to be prepared to participate in class. Written assignments consist of several brief commentaries and three short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Race & Nation in Latin America. Meets with Honors 250.005 and History 302.002.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/258/001.nsf

In this course, we will look at how concepts and relations of race vary across Latin America and compare with prevailing U.S. conceptions. Our focus will be on how racial categories are tied to distinctions based on class, ethnicity, gender, and nationality. In particular, we will examine how racial disctinctions and relations are represented and altered as a result of social movements, cultural initiatives, and political conflicts. We will use a variety of materials, including fiction, film, music and testimonial accounts, and will look at studies of peoples in Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Venezuela, and other Latin American countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 272 / LING 272. Language in Society.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/272/001.nsf

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include: What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class, and gender? How do perceptions of language contribute to the transformation of social differences into relationships of unequal power? In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how understandings of language contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. Most importantly, we will consider how divisions such as "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" are founded in social, rather than linguistic judgments. Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are: (1) Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change; (2) the relationship between language and social life as seen in the interaction between language and social understandings of group membership, such as race, class and gender; (3) issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development and alteration of official and unofficial linguistic standards, and the social consequences of language change and language death. Throughout the course we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world, with the goal of using comparisons to highlight differences and similarities across languages and communities. There are no prerequisites for this course. Requirements for the course include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include a textbook and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 317 / REES 397. The Political Economy of Transformation in East Central Europe.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 Meets with REES 396.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 396. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rees/396/001.nsf

This course offers an overview of Eastern Europe, emphasizing changes in that region since 1989 in the context of the previous communist system. Using an anthropological perspective, it gives attention to the region's pre-communist history and how socialism worked, then moves to the "revolutions" of 1989; the second half of the course looks at contemporary economic, social, political, and cultural processes. These include new political behaviors, making private property, decollectivization of agricultural land, markets and consumption, changing gender relations, and problems of nationalism. The course may be elected for credit in the Center for Russian and East European Studies or in the Department of Anthropology; it is run as a combination of lecture and class discussion, with section meetings. Course requirements include an in-class midterm and final examination, a short paper, and class participation. Books to be purchased include:

  • Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed;
  • Walter Adams and James Brock, Adam Smith Goes to Moscow;
  • Dennis Hupchick, Concise Atlas of Eastern Europe; and
  • Stephen White, Communism and its Collapse.

There will be a sizable course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 330. Culture, Thought, and Meaning.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an intensive, upper-division introduction to cultural studies. We will trace variations of the concept of culture and its relation to thought and meaning from the nineteenth century to the present. Much of the course is organized around current debates in anthropology about structure, personality, interpretation, cognition, metaphor, practice, gender, and the body. The ethnographic settings of these debates range from the hills of the northern Philippines to our own homes. The first goal of the course is to give you a rich introductory understanding of current theoretical movements in cultural anthropology and a stronger appreciation of cultural difference in all its forms. This is also a writing-intensive course. The second goal of the course is to give you hands-on experience in writing academic prose of high quality. Your performance in the course will be judged primarily through your written essays, which should deal in a substantive way with what you learn from the readings and lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 340 / HISTORY 340. Colonial Histories/Postcolonial Presents.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Meets with Comparative Literature 384.002.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1945 one-third of the world's landmass was under some form of colonial rule. Despite formal decolonization throughout the world by the 1950s and 1960s (in India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Kenya, Senegal, Morocco,and Vietnam to name a few) some scholars would argue that "empire" and the models of domination developed during the 18th and 19th centuries continue to shape the distribution of goods, services, and knowledge in the world today.

  • How is it that literally billions of people could be dominated by such small numbers of colonizing countries throughout most of the 19th and 20th century?
  • What is "post-colonialism"?
  • Does it refer to the fact that colonialism is long over or the very opposite, that colonialism is alive and well in newly fashioned forms?
  • What's the relationship between the rise of racism in France, Germany, and England and the history of colonialism in these countries?
  • If colonial power was in part based on the control and distribution of knowledge of which history-writing is a part how do we write colonial histories that don't reflect only the history of the "winners?

This course looks at some of the shared features of colonial cultures in a range of different periods and different locations through the Americas, Asia, and Africa. It focuses on the broad social and racial policies of colonial rule and everyday sites of their implementation. We will look at the large and small scale forms of refusal and resistance that people mounted against powerful colonial regimes. The course will draw on films that mirror the continuing memory of colonial rule in people's visions of the world today. We will ask why colonialism matters in the contemporary world in some places more than others, why for some it is hard to remember, for others hard to forget. In each case, we will read books that attempt to write new kinds of histories that attempt to understand how colonialism created its colonizers and its colonized. This is a seminar that offers new ways of understanding the present because of the new ways we can look at the past. In short, this course familiarizes students with the political and cultural issues that arise in studying and identifying "the colonial" in the postcolonial world today.

Books include: The Colonizer and the Colonized, Silencing the Past, Tensions of Empire, The Colonel and the Convict, Speaking with Vampires.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 344(444). Medical Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/344/001.nsf

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This course will examine beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers will be explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we will also draw upon examples from Western biomedicine among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorders, schizophrenia to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 370 / LING 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/ling/370/001.nsf

See Linguistics 370.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in a seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 403. Japanese Society and Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a multi-media course designed to introduce and explore the salient patterns in and of (mostly post-WW2) Japanese society and culture. Our overall aim is to appreciate the ways in which Japanese women and men, girls and boys from punks and theatre fans to police officers and office workers construe, construct, communicate, reproduce, and resist everyday practices and realities. We will also challenge and transcend parochial stereotypes of Japan (of Japanese and Euro-American invention alike). Japan warrants closer attention by Americans and for more reasons than the wild success of animation (anime'), Nintendo, and Pokemon in their everyday lives. Long characterized in the popular and scholarly media as the "cultural opposite" of the United States for example, "the Japanese" are homogeneous, more polite, less litigious, less violent (but more suicidal), and more tuned to nature than "the Americans" people are understandably surprised to learn that Japan was a powerful empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; that it has a long history of social unrest and feminist activism; that it is a multi-ethnic society; that its mass media thrive on gratuitous sex and violence; and that its environment is one of the most polluted in the capitalist world. Rather than casting Japan and the U.S. as opposites, it is more productive to understand the various forces and circumstances out of which institutions such as the constitution, educational system, racism, consumerism, health care, popular entertainment, the police, etc. emerged and were shaped in each society. This then, is our mission: to look carefully and closely at those Japanese social structures, institutions and practices that either closely resemble or greatly deviate from those of mainstream America so that we can simultaneously learn how to understand better the complexities of American culture and society which is far more than just the "opposite" of everything Japan represents. Ditto Japan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 404. Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Webb Keane Jr (wkeane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Southeast Asia is marked by enormous diversity in everything from ecology to political systems. Long a dynamic cross-road between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific, the region is socially and culturally complex. Today, for example, it includes important groups of all the world's major religions. Indonesia, the world's fourth largest country, is home to the largest Islamic population within a single national border; the Philippines, whose complicated special relationship with the United States dates back to the nineteenth century, is predominantly Catholic. In the background to these large nation-states are hundreds of distinct traditions and languages, including the royal courts of Java, the ritual systems of Hindu Bali, hunting-based societies of the Borneo forests, and rice-farming villages of Malaysia, as well as significant diasporic communities such as urban Chinese entrepreneurs. Interacting with these are sprawling mega-cities and multi-national industrial enclaves. This course will approach the region by way of selected case studies, through the reading of ethnographic monographs. Our focus will be on island Southeast Asia (Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, East Timor). This course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 411 / CAAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa. Topics covered include: ecology, environment, and population; precolonial and colonial origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary African states; family and kinship; religion, music and the arts; race, gender, class, ethnicity, and cultural and national identity; African migration; politics and policies of social change and economic development. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Grades are based on four 5-6 page, type-written, take-home papers, and contributions to class discussion. Film/videos shown in class when available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 417. Indians of Mexico and Guatemala.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101, 222, or junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course provides an overview of Indian groups occupying Mexico and Guatemala. Groups include the Maya, Nahuatl (Aztec), Zapotec, Mixtec, Huichol, Mixe, Tarascans, etc. Course will focus on social and political organization, world view and religion, subsistence, settlement patterns, etc. Comparisons and contrasts between groups will be made in an effort to determine shared ancestry, the borrowing of various practices, the domination of one group over another, and independent developments. Two required papers (midterm and final) constitute course grade. No prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 429. Television, Society, and Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Television has been compared to a new religion, cultivating homogeneity, uniting adherents in a common set of images and symbols. Television executives, commentators, and reporters have become "key gatekeepers" assuming roles played historically by political and religious leaders. TV has been labeled "narcoticizing" and faulted for diverting attention from serious social issues and replacing effective thought and action with passive absorption in portrayals. Television has been said to reinforce existing hierarchies and impede social reform. It also stimulates participation in a worldwide cash economy, and TV's worldwide spread has raised concerns about cultural imperialism. Ethnocentrism is common in the evaluation of television and its effects. Understanding of TV impact can be broadened through a cross-cultural approach to this medium, which, specific content and programming aside, must be recognized as one of the most powerful information disseminators, socializing agents, and public-opinion molders in the contemporary world.

This seminar will consider cross-cultural diversity in TV and will assess the medium's various social, cultural, and psychological dimensions and effects. Students, who will include seniors, concentrators and graduate students in American Culture, Communication, Anthropology, and other related fields will each investigate an aspect of television. Students will be responsible for attending class, organizing and participating in discussions of particular readings, and presenting, orally to the class and in writing, a term paper based on research concerning some aspect of TV impact.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics. The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth. The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization; etc. The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Visual Encounters with the Other.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Language & Socialization. Meets with Ling 492.005, Psych 551.244, Psych 457.001, and Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek, Marilyn J Shatz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on how language use relates to socialization into a group. We will examine this relationship with respect to topics such as identity formation, personhood, socio-economic status, race, and cognition. We will read from the recent literature comparing these various aspects of socialization across different speech communities and then discuss questions such as the following. What kinds of (contextual, linguistic, developmental) constraints impact socialization? What is the nature of and how does the relationship between language and socialization vary across different contexts? Do the levels of analysis in the current research provide reasonable descriptions of both differences and similarities across contexts? We will also discuss where we would like to see future language-socialization research go. Upper-level or graduate student status required. Some background in developmental or cognitive psychology, linguistics, cognitive or linguistic anthropology would be helpful.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Indigenous Political Movements.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the prospects and limits of contemporary indigenous political movements. The emergence of the 'indigenous' as a political category and social movement has opened up new politics and debates about alternative forms of sovereignty and resource use in many parts of the world. This course examines the efforts of indigenous peoples to ensure their own physical and cultural survival, as well as to protect their environment. The paradox of their position, however, is that in order to guarantee their rights, they may need to become activists: the maintenance of difference in the political economy of contemporary culture requires movement and translation across cultural, political and geographic boundaries. Working with these activists is a range of actors, each with their own agendas and resulting compromises for the communities that accept their support. Indigenous political movements have the capacity to introduce new ideas into the public domain in a compelling fashion, presenting alternatives to the universalizing discourses of science and capital. Topics may include, but are not limited to: definitions and histories of indigeneity; the politics of culture and representation; debates about sovereignty and special rights; social movements and civil society; alternative notions of space, place and time; the intersection of indigenous politics and global environmentalism; and indigenous knowledge and debates about intellectual and cultural property rights. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Pacific, Southeast Asia and the Americas, with special emphasis on Melanesia and Amazonia. Readings: several monographs and electronic course reserves. Requirements: regular participation, several short papers and a research project and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/458/004.nsf

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." Are such groupings based on shared language? Many Americans and Euopreans assume that communicites are normally monolingual that a common language brings people together, and language differences divide them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual. What do language similarities and differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? We will consider what can be meant by each of our three terms, "language" (when do differences matter for social identities?), "ethnicity" (what is the basis of ethnic identity?), and "nationalism" (what social program is entailed?). Drawing on cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we seek to understand how linguistic similarities and differencees real or imagined unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology. Readings and discussions will concern topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and the emergence of print media; conceptions of "nation" and "language" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in debates about national identity, at home and abroad.

In addition to the class discussions and readings that involve the whole class, each student will explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, an in-class test, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 Thinking Across Cultures. Meets with Psych 487.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the course, we will evaluate descriptive and experimental treatments of the ways "traditional" concerns in psychology have been explored across cultures. This includes relationships between language and thought, categorization and inference, problem-solving and decision-making. We also will treat cross-cultural research that falls within the emerging frameworks of "domain-specificity" and evolutionary psychology: including, folkphysics, folkpsychology, folkbiology, and folksociology. Finally, we will explore how these insights can illuminate understanding of such pervasive cross-cultural phenomena as religion and environmental cognition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/461/001.nsf

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices, and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages. We will focus on topics such as the relationship between language and landscape, oral narratives, language and thought, dominant/subordinate language contact situations, sign language, and literacy. No special background is required, but students should have upper-level or graduate student status. Course requirements include preparation for and active participation in discussions, three short book reviews, a midterm exam, and a paper on a topic related to the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 475. Ethnography of Writing.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/475/001.nsf

Examining genres that range from lists to letters and novels, and from contracts to constitutions, this course looks at writing as a cultural practice. The approach is contextual and historical, situating specific forms of writing (and reading) in relation to class, gender, and cultural background, and with respect to precolonial, colonial, nation-state, and transnational settings. While the course criticizes analyses that rely mainly on evolutionary schemes, technological determinisms, or projections of western European history, it advances the tools of a cultural analysis of writing. This approach draws on recent research in linguistic anthropology, adapts ideas from literary criticism and cultural studies, and integrates indigenous theories about texts. Ethnographies of writing and reading are anchored in detailed studies set in several parts of the world, various historical periods, and in contexts such as schools, courts, political arenas, and ordinary life. Topics will include the relation of the spoken and the written, forms of script and print, authors and authority, uses of literacy, and the role of writing in bureaucracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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