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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Civilization


This page was created at 11:38 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


CLCIV 102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joseph D Reed (josephdr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What did it mean to be Roman in the Ancient World? Was it all about togas, orgies, and world conquest? Or anxiety, violence, and a propensity for self-destruction? This course will approach the issue of Roman identity from a variety of social, political, and philosophical angles. Using selected Roman historians (Livy, Tacitus) and poets (Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan) as our guides, we will explore who the Romans thought they were, what position they felt their society occupied in the Mediterranean world and in the universe, and how their self-definition changed over time. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which the Romans constructed their past in order to understand who they were in the present. Grade will be based on exams, papers, and participation in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 341. Classics and Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/CC341/index.htm

Classical antiquity and the movies have been closely associated for almost a century. This course will explore how (mostly Hollywood) cinema has represented the ancient past and its literature. Reading the ancient sources and seeing how films have transformed them, we will look especially at the hateful tyranny and attractive decadence of the movies' ancient Rome. Beginning with the silent era (Last Days of Pompeii) and the 1903's (de Mille's Cleopatra of 1934)) we will examine films such as Quo Vadis, Ben Hur, Spartacus,, Cleopatra (1963), and Fall of the Roman Empire, as well as the pornographic Caligula of 1980 and Fellini's srange Satyricon. We will also look at comedies such as Roman Scandals (1933) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, and Life of Brian. There will be three short (4-page) papers, an hour exam, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 385(462). Greek Mythology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Mfw Verhoogt (verhoogt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~verhoogt/cc385.html

Greek Mythology comprises a group of traditional stories that discuss a number of universal themes such as creation, death, gods, heroes, the Other, family feuds, local history, and not to forget sex and cannibalism. In this course we will study the development of these tales in Greek literature and art. We will look at the myths themselves but also consider the context in which they have come down to us. We should realize that while we see Greek myths largely as a form of entertainment (Disney's Hercules for example), in antiquity myths also offered the Greeks valid explanations of the universe, mankind and society. Our focus will be on the interplay between myths and ancient society in both its contemporary and modern interpretations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 386(463). Greek Drama.

Section 001 Nietzsche and Tragedy. Meets with CompLit 362.001.

Instructor(s): James I Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 362.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 393. Plato's Dialogues in English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/clciv/393/001.nsf

In this course we will read the major dialogues, covering the entire span of Plato's philosophical career. Starting with the "early" Socratic works, we will move on to such masterpieces as the the Phaedo, and Symposium, and then finish with several of the later dialogues, including Theaetetus and Parmenides. Topics include Plato's ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics, as well as issues of interpretation in both the ancient and modern world. We will spend some time looking at how contemporary theorists, such as Heidegger or Derrida, read Plato. There will be two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 478. Roman Family Law.

Section 001 Meets with Latin 642.001.

Instructor(s): Bruce W Frier (bwfrier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to freshmen. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the past two decades, our understanding of the Roman family has been revolutionized by scholars who have sharply questioned the realism of the law that governed these families. Roman law is uncompromising in two main respects: marriage is not only easy to enter, but easy to end, to such an extent that the marriage bond appears too weak to be socially sustainable; on the other hand, the male head of the Roman household (pater familias) has such absolute power over his descendants, no matter their age, as to make them seem little more than his servants. Modern historians have critically reexamined whether these sources amount to what they seem, particularly when they are juxtaposed with literary sources describing Roman private life. This course will take up the debate, allowing students to decide for themselves regarding a lively and on-going dispute. In the process, students will learn how to think about the social implications of legal sources an issue of some significance also in the modern world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CLCIV 480. Studying Antiquity.

Section 001 City of Alexandria.

Instructor(s): Benjamin B Acosta-Hughes (bacosta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CLCIV 101 or 102, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a capstone seminar intended mainly for juniors and seniors in Classical Civilization or Classical Archaeology. Its purpose is to offer a forum for informed discussion of a variety of difficult questions about access to the classical past, and its modern-day ownership and presentation, seen primarily from the perspective of material culture (archaeology, art, museum displays, etc.).

The focus of this year's Capstone Seminar (CC 480) will be the city of Alexandria in Greek art, literature, and thought. Founded by Alexander as a Greek city looking out upon the Mediterranean, its presence in Egypt rendered it a multi-cultural metropolis that in many ways prefigures the modern cosmopolitan large city. In the course of the semester we will view this city from a variety of perspectives: as capital of the Ptolemaic kings and center of court patronage; as major port of a vast ancient economy; as cultural image in contemporary and later thought. Our primary sources (all in English) will include Alexandrian poets, philosophers, satirists, and a variety of voices drawn from many aspects of urban society. We will consider how Alexandrians lived, worked, traveled, loved, and mourned. A particular focus of the course will be the epigrams, first published in 2001, attributed to the 3rd cent. BCE poet Posidippus, many of which focus on the city, its rulers, its courtiers, and its common people. Together we will examine the ways a city defines itself, and is defined by others.

Course requirements include regular attendance and participation, two short oral reports, and a research paper of ca. 30 pages to be submitted at the seminar's conclusion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

Graduate Course Listings for CLCIV.


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