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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 11:39 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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COMPLIT 122. Writing World Literatures.

Section 001 Writing World Literatures.

Instructor(s): Carrie Wood

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To translate means to carry across; it implies a bridging of domains (linguistic, ethnic, national, historical, cultural, personal, etc.) and a fluency in each. Beginning with a focus on language, we will address the question of what it means to be fluent in a culture or society. From there we will expand our conceptions of fluency and translation to incorporate questions of form, perspective, value, and meaning. We will take up some of the following questions: What kinds of translation do we do every day? What does it mean to translate a story or a message or information from one place or time to another? From one medium to another? From one person to another? Are there things that simply cannot be translated, that inevitably "get lost in translation"? If so, what are the implications of this for our understanding of our own culture or other cultures? As we consider these questions and the many others that are sure to arise in our discussions in the context of specific narratives, we will connect the problem of translation to the task of writing. Because there are no exact matches between words of different languages, a translator must constantly make choices. These choices add up to a kind of interpretation of the text. In producing a new text, the translator combines the critical and the creative and becomes in a sense the text's most intimate reader. Thus, in this course, we will be both critical and creative as we become intimate with texts and attempt to build bridges across languages and cultures. Through reflection upon these texts as models of thinking, speaking, and writing we will strive to improve our own analytic and communicative skills and become more self-conscious about how the ways in which we write (and think and speak) affect both ourselves and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 122. Writing World Literatures.

Section 002 Writing World Literatures.

Instructor(s): Sean Jeffrey Cotter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

To translate means to carry across; it implies a bridging of domains (linguistic, ethnic, national, historical, cultural, personal, etc.) and a fluency in each. Beginning with a focus on language, we will address the question of what it means to be fluent in a culture or society. From there we will expand our conceptions of fluency and translation to incorporate questions of form, perspective, value, and meaning. We will take up some of the following questions: What kinds of translation do we do every day? What does it mean to translate a story or a message or information from one place or time to another? From one medium to another? From one person to another? Are there things that simply cannot be translated, that inevitably "get lost in translation"? If so, what are the implications of this for our understanding of our own culture or other cultures? As we consider these questions and the many others that are sure to arise in our discussions in the context of specific narratives, we will connect the problem of translation to the task of writing. Because there are no exact matches between words of different languages, a translator must constantly make choices. These choices add up to a kind of interpretation of the text. In producing a new text, the translator combines the critical and the creative and becomes in a sense the text's most intimate reader. Thus, in this course, we will be both critical and creative as we become intimate with texts and attempt to build bridges across languages and cultures. Through reflection upon these texts as models of thinking, speaking, and writing we will strive to improve our own analytic and communicative skills and become more self-conscious about how the ways in which we write (and think and speak) affect both ourselves and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 Living Past.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/complit/140/001.nsf

It's an insult in this country these days to tell someone she or he is "living in the past." We of course want to live in the present, to be here, now. But isn't the past here, now, too? Doesn't the past live in the present? In this class we will think about the ways in which the past lives in the present, and the ways in which present-living people from various periods and cultures have tried to live with the past. We'll think about politics, trauma, memory, and time travel. Readings may include a poem about a mysteriously incorrupt dead body (St Erkenwald), a double memoir about an Indian anthropologist doing fieldwork in Egypt and searching for a 12th-century slave, a case study of an odd man haunted by a bad dream (Freud's "Wolfman"), a novel about time travel (The Doomsday Book). We'll also see a film or two, and do some fieldwork. Who cares about the past? We do.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 Women Writers & Classical Myth. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will ask why twentieth-century women writers (re)turn to Classical mythology, and how they (re)write particular myths to engender new meanings. Among the writers we will consider are Louise Gluck, H.D., Rita Dove, Marguerite Yourcenar, Christa Wolf, Adrienne Kennedy, and Anne Carson. In addition to learning how to read different forms of literature (fiction, poetry, translation, drama), you will develop your skills in literary criticism by writing a series of short papers. You will also have the opportunity to write your own creative version of a Classical myth.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 002 Reading and Healing.

Instructor(s): Madelaine A Hron

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/complit/241/002.nsf

The concept of healing through books goes back as far as ancient Greece, where the door to the library in Thebes bore the telling inscription: "The Healing Place of the Soul." Most people recognize the soothing effect of a good book, and turn to books as a means of inspiration, enlightenment or escape. In this class, through engaged reading and self-examination, we will explore the healing power of the written word. We will probe how writing defines our place in the world, how it creates identity, gender, or ethnicity and what it conveys about relationships, memories, character and the meaning and purpose of life. Most importantly, we will delve into what books have to teach us when things go wrong; we will confront such issues as loss and grief, depression and madness, illness and disability, old age and senility, discrimination and sexual abuse and violence and terror. Most of our readings will be short stories or excerpts drawn from major writers from all over the world; they will include some essays by thinkers on the subject of healing and writing and reflections by doctors and patients. We will complement our class discussions with films, documentaries, radio excerpts and art available on-line on the class web-site. Readings may include selections from Aristotle, Nietzsche, Elie Wiesel, Toni Morrison, Oliver Sachs and movies such as Iris or Girl Interrupted. The writing requirements will include short personal reflections weekly, a midterm and final essay. Class attendance and participation will be vital.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMPLIT 280. America and Its Others.

Section 001 Vietnam is Not a War: Literature & Film of the Vietnamese Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Lily V Chiu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is Vietnam? To many Americans, Vietnam is only a war a traumatic and unforgettable part of our national consciousness. For many French people, Vietnam is an ex-colony, a nostalgic topos engrained in French memory as a lost treasure. For many Vietnamese, who fought for over a millennium against the Chinese, the French, and the Americans, Vietnam means independence. What does "Vietnam" mean to you?

In this class, we will read Vietnamese literature from the early 19th century to the present, including works by Nguyen Du, Ho Xuan Huong, Linda Le, Duong Thu Huong, Pham Thi Hoai, Ly Lan, Le Minh Khue, and Lan Cao. The writers we will read are all of Vietnamese origin, but some live in America, some in France, and some have stayed in Vietnam. By comparing the texts of these writers, we will also be comparing the different cultures that shaped their lives. How has exile and immigration affected those who now live in the "West"? How has living beyond the war and with Communism affected those who still live in Vietnam?

In addition to reading these texts, we will watch several films by Vietnamese film-makers, including Cyclo by Tran Anh Hung, Surname Viet, Given Name Nam by Trinh T. Minh-ha and Three Seasons by Tony Bui. We will also read some supplementary texts on postcolonial, film and feminist theory. All texts will be in English, but students are encouraged to read the texts in the original language if possible. Course requirements include bi-weekly two-page response papers and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 340 / MODGREEK 340. Travels to Greece.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Artemis S Leontis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/modgreek/340/001.nsf

See Modern Greek 340.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 362. Comparative Studies in Form and Genre.

Section 001 Nietzsche and Tragedy. Meets with Classical Civilization 386.001.

Instructor(s): James I Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer an introduction to one of the most innovative modern thinkers on Greek tragedy. The core of the course will be formed around Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy, or, Hellenism and Pessimism, with supplementary readings by Nietzsche from around the time (1872) and excerpts from his later writings on the Greeks and on Greek tragedy. By way of background we will read and discuss a handful of Greek plays (Prometheus Bound, Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Euripides' Bacchae ), and we will also look at ancient and contemporary literature written on (or against) Nietzsche and Nietzschean themes (for example, on the ritual origins of Greek tragedy, Dionysianism, catharsis theory, psychoanalysis, and cultural criticism), including short selections from Plato, Aristotle, Wilamowitz, Jacob Bernays, Walter Burkert, Freud, Lacan, Jonathan Lear, and Bernard Williams, as well as a book called Nothing To Do With Dionysus?. No prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 384(424). Literature and Other Disciplines.

Section 001 Literature for Psychologists. Meets with PSYCH 401.004 and GERMAN 449.001.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in literary studies. (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Literature may well be the most complex expression of human conditions we have, as an eloquent record of interior states, as a richly detailed observation of behavior, motivation, and interpersonal relations, or as sustained self-reflection on the nature of language in construing our images of self and the world. The goal of this course is to acquaint future psychologists (and all others who might be interested) with ways of reading works of literature both as psychological records and as critical reflections on psychology. Its rationale is that much of therapeutic dialogue is in nature hermeneutic, and that the study of literature aids us in analyzing and understanding human utterance in general and important elements of self-representation (like narrative structure, metaphor, symbol) in particular. In addition, this course will look at the literary elements in seminal psychological texts (e.g., Freud, Winnicott). Readings may include: Sophocles: Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare: Hamlet, Flaubert: Mme Bovary, Dostoyevsky: Notes from Underground, Kafka: Letter to His Father, Eliot: Four Quartets, Morrison: Beloved, Menaker: The Treatment, Palahniuk: Fight Club. We will also watch two films, Suddenly Last Summer, and The Three Faces of Eve. Requirements: attendance, participation, two 8-pp papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 384(424). Literature and Other Disciplines.

Section 002 Colonial Histories/Postcolonial Presents. Meets with Cultural Anthropology 340.001 and History 304.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in literary studies. (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 340.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 384(424). Literature and Other Disciplines.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in literary studies. (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

Section 001 Berlin, City of Extremes A Study in Art and Politics Between the Wars.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taking as its focus the city of Berlin, and its turbulent history between the two world wars, this course proposes a close-up study of the complex relation between art and politics in modern Europe. While the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) offered German, as well as other European artists living in Berlin, the opportunity to explore new forms of expression, with remarkable results, Hitler's rise to power in 1933 opened a period of severe political and artistic repression. In order to explore the limits of artistic freedom between the wars, we will focus on Weimar modernist and avant-garde productions in theater and film, as well as on the creative activities of European artists in Berlin (e. g. Josephine Becker, Julian Green, Christopher Isherwood, W. H. Auden, V. Nabokov). The effects of censorship and ideological complicity during the Third Reich will be examined in relation to state-sponsored film production and architecture, and the peculiar phenomenon of retrenchment represented by "inner exile." A special emphasis will be given to gender issues, insofar as they reveal the distance between sexual liberation, and personal repression, experiment and conformity, that marks the extremes of social and artistic life in Berlin during the interwar period. Examples will be drawn from fiction, theater, journalism, film, and architecture, produced either by Berliners themselves or by visitors and expatriates. Students from other disciplines are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

Section 002 Modernism and Its Other.

Instructor(s): Lydia Liu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the evolution of modernist aesthetics in response to war, cultural dislocation, and ethnic migration since the late nineteenth century. We will read canonical modernist texts alongside South Asian, African, Russian, Chinese, and Latin-American texts and explore the journey of literary "modernism" across the boundaries of national literatures. Our goal is to reconsider modernist texts in a global context in which Western and non-Western writers or artists engage in direct or implicit dialogue (or debate) concerning the meanings of suffering, memory, love, violence, and humanism.

Requirements: short papers, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 496. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

COMPLIT 498. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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