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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Environment


This page was created at 11:41 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ENVIRON 111(UC 111) / GEOSCI 172 / SOC 111 / NRE 111 / AOSS 172. Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Allan (dallan@umich.edu), Mary Anne Carroll (mcarroll@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange2/

Course E-mail: globalchange@umich.edu

Instructors:
David Allan SNRE
Richard Ford Anthropology
Gayl Ness Sociology
Lisa Curran SNRE/Biology
Mary Anne Carroll AOSS/Chemistry
Vincent Abreu AOSS
Ben van der Pluijm Geology

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid changes now occurring in the Earth as a system its climate, human population, natural resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II Human Impacts guides students in learning about the natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-based introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, and our impacts on land, air, and water resources and on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is appropriate for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly written lab exercises, a poster project, midterms, and final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn about:

  1. Human Population Growth
    • Its History and Social Influences
  2. Detection of Global Environmental Change
    • Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
  3. Human Impacts on Resources
    • Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources
    • Urban and Industrial Environments
    • Deforestation and Desertification
    • Biodiversity
  4. Achieving Sustainable Development
    • Economics of Development
    • International Treaties and Government
  5. Our Common Future
    • Models of the Future
    • Role of Culture,Technology and the Individual

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 139 / NRE 139. First-Year Seminar in the Environment.

Section 019 Environment, Sustainability, & Social Change. Meets with UC 154.001.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/uc/154/001.nsf

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand, at both the global and local levels, the emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will address the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community-based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Over the course of the academic term, seminar members will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and will utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be primarily individual, but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 191 / RCNSCI 291. The Biodiversity of the United States.

Section 001 Meets January -March 12. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Catherine E Badgley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/envrnstd/291/001.nsf

See RC Natural Science 291.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 210 / NRE 210. Introduction to Environmental Policy Making.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Mohai

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/210/001.nsf

Introduces social, political, and organizational processes that influence and shape environmental and natural resources policy. Topics include the legislative processes; agency functioning and behavior; interest-group activity; interaction in the political arena; the role and influence of technical information, public opinion, historical antecedent, and prevailing social conditions and institutions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 239 / NRE 239. Introduction to Environmental Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 115 and ENVIRON 100. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/239/001.nsf

Applications of introductory mathematical, statistical, geographical, and mapping concepts for analysis of environmental data. Computer labs use example data sets and statistics and GIS software.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 263(ENVRNSTD 263) / RCNSCI 263 / UP 263. Energy and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marc W Melaina

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, or any college course in mathematics or natural science. (4). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/environ/263/001.nsf

See RC Natural Science 263.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 300 / NRE 300. Special Problems and Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study covering different resource issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENVIRON 311 / NRE 311. Introduction to Aquatic Ecosystems.

Section 001 Meets with NRE 511.001.

Instructor(s): Michael J Wiley (mjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in biology and chemistry. (4). (Excl). (BS). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mjwiley/www311/index.html

Introduces fundamental physical/chemical/biological concepts and basic techniques necessary for the study of aquatic ecosystems. Covers physical-chemical processes, overview of aquatic fauna and flora, and surveys major types of aquatic ecosystems including rivers and streams, lakes, wetlands, oceans. Interactions between the hydrological cycle and the landscape provide the basic theme around which ecosystem presentations are organized. Laboratory sections present basic taxonomic materials during the first half of the course; during later half lab sessions will focus on field trips to representative environments and on the collection of biological specimens for required individual collections. Prerequisite: Introductory Biology/Ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 312(NRE 480) / POLSCI 380 / NRE 312. Environmental Politics and Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry Rabe

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an advanced offering on environmental politics and the environmental policymaking process. The course will consider both processes of policy formation and implementation, placing particular emphasis on the development of alternatives to conventional regulatory practices at federal, state, and local levels of government.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 315 / EEB 315. The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mercedes Pascual (pascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 100 or 162. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/eeb/315/001.nsf

See Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 315.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 333 / NRE 333. Writing About Natural Resources and Environment.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: junior standing and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course taken in conjunction with regular SNRE courses by which the upper-level writing requirement is met.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENVIRON 350. The Built Environment: Introduction to Landscape Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erickson, Michener

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/environ/350/001.nsf

The content of this course is broad, but critically important for helping informed citizens learn to look at the things we build and the spaces we inhabit. Built environments affect our entire lives, yet we rarely focus on their influence. This course bridges the natural science, social science and humanities realms anticipated in the new Program in the Environment. Course lectures and readings emphasize breadth over depth. student case study work, however, will develop depth in particular landscape topics.

This course is an introduction to the role of humans in shaping the built environment. It explores physical design and cultural meaning at various scales and contexts in the landscape. We explore the power of physical design and planning to enrich the human spirit, provide functional needs, interpret cultural history, and sustain natural systems. The course is concerned with exploring how Americans shape space and how, in turn, space shapes people. We take a topical approach, dealing with different aspects of landscape change, design and planning. The course illustrates how humans have adapted and shaped landscapes for functional and aesthetic goals. A unifying theme is emphasized throughout: the important link between natural and social processes of landscape change. Landscape design and planning professional skills will not be taught directly; the goal is not to prepare students for landscape architecture practice. However, this course is designed to encourage students to think about land from many different perspectives. Prepare to think, talk and write about villages, mobile homes, theme parks, shopping malls, freeways and farms, among other built forms. You will be asked to consider many aspects of these diverse places economic, social, historical, political, and ecological.

Three exams per term. Five assignments, including a semester-long journal exercise and four other exercises that have two to five pages of writing each.

Intended audience: Sophomores and Juniors in the Program in the Environment, or elsewhere in LSA. The course should appeal both to students interested in environmental literacy generally, and to those following specific environmental career tracks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 361 / NRE 361. The Psychology of Environmental Stewardship.

Section 001 Meets with NRE 561.001.

Instructor(s): Raymond De Young (rdeyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/nre361/

One of the enduring challenges of crafting a sustainable society is to create one in which people will want to live. A restrained and austere existence will likely prove to be an ecologically necessity. It is unlikely, however, that people will eagerly pursue such a life if it is presented as the unfortunate necessity of survival. The issue here is how to reframe and then promote such a future so that people not only willingly accept it but actually seek it out. This is primarily a behavioral, not a political or technological, challenge. To meet this challenge behavior change tools and strategies are developed. Emphasis is on informational and motivational means of changing behavior in a durable manner. Case studies provide examples of programs at the individual, institutional and community level.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 365 / NRE 365. International Environmental Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Princen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores institutions, actors, and outcomes in international environmental policymaking. It examines international dimensions of industrialized and developing country policies and considers normative and ethical issues, effects of political and economic power, institutional setting and world views. Special attention is given to negotiations in bilateral, regional, and global contexts; and to actors ranging from superpowers to small states, international organizations to non-governmental actors. An effort is made to identify the key actors, processes, and institutional arrangements necessary to address critical transboundary environmental problems. The focus is on key actors and the processes by which disputes are or can be managed. The course uses extensive readings, case studies, and simulations and applies a variety of theoretical perspectives on international affairs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 370 / NRE 370 / ARCH 423 / UP 423. Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/up/423/001.nsf

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 375 / ECON 370 / NRE 375. Natural Resource Economics.

Section 001 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.

Instructor(s): Michael R Moore

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECON 101 and 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 471 or 472. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/375/001.nsf

A one-term introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. Topics include externalities, unpriced goods, cost-benefit analysis, resource scarcity, exhaustible resource depletion, renewable resource harvesting and common property problems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 377(ENVRNSTD 407) Literature and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Parrish

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 396 / CAAS 396 / NRE 396. History of Environmental Thought and Activism.

Section 001 Meets with NRE 596.001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/396/001.nsf

The course uses a race, class, and gender approach to examine the history of American environmental activism (1850-present). It identifies the major period of environmental mobilization and significant forms of environmental activism among the white middle class, white working class, and people of color.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 398 / NRE 398. Natural Resources Internship Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty sponsor. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

ENVIRON 399 / NRE 399. Junior Honors Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond De Young (rdeyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course starts Program in the Environment and SNRE Honors students on their research projects. During the term students develop a topic of interest into a research proposal. This requires identifying the topic, accessing pertinent literature, finding a faculty sponsor, developing a research design, and writing a research proposal. Course readings and discussions will focus on research methodology and dissemination of research findings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 403 / HISTART 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/403/001.nsf

This course will survey the design and management of human settlements and their surrounding landscapes throughout history. The range of examples and sites will be viewed within the context of the cultural, political, social, and environmental forces that shaped them, and also their lingering effect on 20th-century perceptions of the landscape.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 408 / NRE 408. Wetlands Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas A Wilcox

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes the role of wetlands as a component of ecosystems, landscapes, and global biogeochemical cycles. The science and management of wetland ecosystems provides a framework to discuss the importance of wetlands as a sustainable resource for water quantity and quality, wildlife habitat, and preservation of natural areas.

Terminology, classification, functions, values, hydrology, biogeochemistry; biological adaptations; development, succession, vegetation fauna; habitat relationship, peatlands, Great Lakes coastal wetlands, managment and restoration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 409 / EEB 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 001 This section for students electing LEC/LAB. [4 credits]. Meets with ENVIRON 409.003.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre409/

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 409 / EEB 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 003 This section for student electing LEC only, and grad students. [3 Credits]. Meets with Environ 409.001.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre409/

See Environment 409.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 418 / NRE 418. Biology and Management of Insects.

Section 001 [4 credits]. Meets with ENVIRON 418.005.

Instructor(s): John A Witter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. (Excl). (BS). ENVIRON 418 must be elected for a minimum of 4 credits to meet the requirement for an applied ecology course, and a minimum of 3 credits to satisfy the Resource Management Requirement or be included in the REM Concentration. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules:

  1. concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students],
  2. interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and
  3. lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 418 / NRE 418. Biology and Management of Insects.

Section 005 [2 credits]. Meets with ENVIRON 418.001.

Instructor(s): John A Witter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. (Excl). (BS). ENVIRON 418 must be elected for a minimum of 4 credits to meet the requirement for an applied ecology course, and a minimum of 3 credits to satisfy the Resource Management Requirement or be included in the REM Concentration. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Environment 418.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 420 / NRE 420. Principles of Geographic Information Systems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel G Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 239 or graduate standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~danbrown/nre420/

The goals of this course are to provide a firm understanding of the issues that affect the use of GIS for application, research, and planning in natural resources. You will learn to conceptualize and implement geographic data management and analysis for research and application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 425 / EEB 496 / NRE 425. Population Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Edward Breck (breck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: General ecology and calculus; and ENVIRON 438; experience with computer spreadsheets desired. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/NRE425/

A quantitative second course in ecology in which principles of population ecology (single and multiple species) are examined from both theoretical and applied viewpoints. Principles will be examined using a wide range of organisms. Many applications of population ecology will be considered, including: conservation of long-lived species, harvest optimization, biological control, biology of introduced and invading species, biodiversity, island biogeography, metapopulations, and ecological risk assessment. Computer applications will use spreadsheets and mathematical software.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 441 / NRE 441. Remote Sensing of the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Mary Bergen

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 239 or upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/441/001.nsf

This is an introductory interdisciplinary remote sensing course. Students will learn the theory, sensors, analysis methods, and applications of environmental remote sensing. Specifically students will learn fundamentals of electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with earth terrain. Students will learn:

  • sensor systems, including both optical and microwave
  • remote sensing image characteristics, measurement, and analysis methods
  • applications problem analysis to determine which remote sensing systems can supply needed data, and cost-effective approaches to environmental problem solution.

Course instructors and student groups present case studies from fields such as forestry/forest ecology, agriculture, archeology, conservation biology, geology, mapping, ocean science, pollution detection, urban, vegetation damage, wildlife habitat assessments, and watershed ecology.

Two one-hour lectures per week and one four-hour lab. Exams consist of two lecture midterm exams, one lab midterm exam, and a combined final exam. Graded material consists of weekly lab problems or write-ups and one lecture group case study oral presentation.

Course textbook (Lillesand and Keifer), lab course pack, and optional lab text (Jensen), Lab software (ERDAS Imagine).

One required Saturday Field trip. Prerequisite: NRE 239 or Senior Standing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 446 / NRE 446. Quantitative Analysis of Ecological Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jensen

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 438, calculus, and at least Junior standing; PC and some mainframe experience desirable. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many global environmental problems are studied with mathematical modeling and simulation. In this course concepts and skills for development and exploration of such models are developed by study of case histories. The emphasis is development of concepts and secondarily development of quantitative and computing skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 481 / NRE 481 / EDCURINS 474. Foundations of Environmental Education.

Section 001 [4 credits; 3 credits for Education students].

Instructor(s): Michaela T Zint (zintmich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in English composition. (4; 3 for School of Education students). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 for School of Education students).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/481/001.nsf

Provides a theoretical understanding of the field of environmental education (EE) with special emphasis on relevant human behavior models, guidelines for developing, implementing, and evaluating EE materials/programs, and current issues in EE. Presents opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using popular EE materials and writing grant proposals. Education students should register for 3 credit hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ENVIRON.


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