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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Film and Video Studies


This page was created at 11:41 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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FILMVID 200. Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production.

Instructor(s): Robert Rayher (rray@umich.edu), Stashu Kybartas (skybar@umich.edu), Terri Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu), Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (CE). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide students with a basic introduction to hands-on production in film, video, and television. Pre-Production, Production, and Post-Production (from basic script form to directing to editing) are all covered, and the differences as well as the similarities of these three related media are explored.

Please note that the first class is located at the Argus Building which is located at 400 South 4th Street (Not 4th Avenue.)

Odd Section Numbers are restricted to Film/Video concentrators

Sections 001, 002 - Rayher, rray@umich.edu
Sections 003, 004, 007, 008 - Kybartas, skybar@umich.edu
Sections 005, 006 - Sarris, tsarris@umich.edu
Sections 009, 010 - Hardacker, hardacke@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

FILMVID 230. Introduction to the Moving Image.

Instructor(s): Frank E Beaver (fbeaver@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This media analysis course explores artistic expression in the motion picture, in broadcast television, and in video art. This course involves extensive viewing of outstanding works in these mediums. Students are engaged in the discovery of those elements unique to film and video imagery through reading, visual analysis, critical writing, lecture, and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 300. Filmmaking I.

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the introductory 16mm motion picture production course. This laboratory-workshop course is designed to give students a solid understanding of how film techniques can be used to communicate ideas in narrative, documentary, and experimental expression. Working in small groups, students script, shoot, and edit exercises build around these three types of film. In creating their short motion pictures, students master master-shot/coverage procedures, screen direction and continuity, and artificial and available light shooting techniques. Lectures and exercise critiques engage students in theoretical/aesthetic discussions of the relationship between film idea and film form. Evaluation: production assignments, midterm test, final project. Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 301. Video Art I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the terminology, aesthetics, and methods of single-camera video production. Using Super-VHS video equipment, students will learn the techniques of single-camera production, including scripting, directing, shooting, and editing. Students work in small groups to design and produce video projects in a variety of styles such as short narrative and experimental documentary. Evaluation will be based on production projects and scripts, production journals, and participation in class discussion and critique. This course is designed to teach students to analyze the relationship between technique and content in video production and to allow students to explore the creative potential of the video medium. Limited to 20 students, with preference given to film and video concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 310. Screenwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry J Lawson

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 310. Screenwriting.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Jaron Curry (Odish) (gorgis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department.

FILMVID 311. Screenwriting for Television.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine M Loeser

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200 and completion of the composition requirement. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The students will write an episode of an existing one-hour television show selected by the instructor. The course covers the entire process of writing for television, from learning the structure and voice of the show, pitching stories for it, writing an extensive outline (or beat sheet) for the episode, and finally writing an authentic script in the proper format. The students are the "writer's room" for all scripts in process.

Requirements: At least two teleplays, and work at rewriting at least one of these. The class will read the teleplays and view multiple episodes of the shows being written by members of the class. Students will read and discuss each other's work. Students can expect to write the equivalent of ten pages a week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 320(420). Documentary Film.

Section 001 Documentary Film and Community Cultures.

Instructor(s): Frank E Beaver (fbeaver@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of the Documentary Films and Community Cultures course (FilmVid 190). The Winter Term course moves from theory and analysis to creative production. Students work in teams of four and produce a short documentary film on Community topics in the Ann Arbor Area.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 320(420). Documentary Film.

Section 002 Students must elect FILMVID 401.001 concurrently.

Instructor(s): Mark H Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu), Stashu Kybartas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/401/001.nsf

This is a co-requisite course with FILMVID 401 Video Art II Documentary, which covers the production aspects of nonfiction film and video. Students must take both courses, which allow them to thoroughly integrate documentary study and production. FILMVID 320 examines documentary practice from the invention of the medium to the present day, paying particular attention to the implications of new technologies like television, video, and computers for nonfiction production. We will be mindful of the historical context for the emergence of any nonfiction form, however, the strong emphasis will be upon the interaction of theory and practice in relation to issues of social import, political value, representing otherness, as well as claims to authenticity and objectivity. The linkage with FILMVID 401 will provide students a unique opportunity to bring theory into practice

Enrollment is limited to 18

Students who wish to register for this class must sign up on the wait list in the Film Video Studies offices in 2512 Frieze Building.

*Please note, students also must enroll in FILMVID 401.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 330(412) / ENGLISH 330. Major Directors.

Section 001 John Ford Made Westerns.

Instructor(s): Gaylyn Studlar (gstudlar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With six Academy Awards, the first AFI Life Achievement award, and every possible accolade his peers could give him, John Ford (1894-1973) was the preeminent director of the classical Hollywood years. Yet Ford was not ashamed to work in a genre that was sometimes disdained by critics the Western, one of the earliest and most popular forms of storytelling in Hollywood history. Ford's attachment to the Western was an important part of his image as a rebel, a rule-breaker who sneered at all pretensions of artistry, but was one of the greatest artists the studio system ever produced: "When I pass on," he once said, "I want to be remembered as 'John Ford a guy that made Westerns.'".

This course will examine the Westerns of John Ford from six decades of filmmaking and the "transforming power of style" exhibited by these films as examplars of a very personal cinema that can grow out of (or in spite of) a very demanding industry environment. It will also explore how Ford's films worked with and against the established conventions of character and narrative formula of the Western were established in photography, painting, popular literature, stage plays, and entertainments such as Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. We will also consider why Ford's work has exerted a continuing influence on directors such as Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Paul Schrader, George Lucas, and John Milius, and why Ford's films still have relevant things to say to us about capitalism, race relations, U.S. national identity, and gender roles.

Readings will include books by Studlar and Bernstein, Lindsay Anderson, Owen Wister, Alan LeMay, and James Fenimore Cooper. Weekly film screenings are required of students. Writing assignments will require students to have acquired, before taking this class, a basic knowledge of film terms and stylistics provided by a course such as FV230 or FV236.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 331(413) / ENGLISH 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 Youth Film.

Instructor(s): Frances K Gateward (gateward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Youth cinema examines films about young people, intended for young audiences (teen to college-age). We will explore issues involved in coming of age, family relations, sexuality, subcultures, gender, race, and class. The majority of the films will be from the United States, though there will be a unit on "International" youth.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 360. The History of World Film.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is required for concentrators in the Program in Film and Video Studies, but is open to all students. The course examines the rich contribution of nations other than the United States to world cinema, understanding these films both as responses to the dominant American film industry and as unique expressions of their own national cultures. The course will also discuss the influences of these national cinemas on one another as well as on American film. By focusing on a series of classic films, the class will examine German Expressionism, Soviet Cinema, French Poetic Realism, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, post-war Japanese cinema, as well as the cinemas of Spain, India, and Eastern Europe. Students will write midterm and endterm papers of about eight pages each and take a midterm and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 361 / WOMENSTD 361. Women and Film.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristen M Whissel (kwhissel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($45) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An examination of films made by, for, and about women. The class will include theatrical and experimental films from the beginning years of film, through the heyday of the studio system, and into the development of alternative, specifically feminist film forms. Films will be analyzed in historical perspective to reveal how societal norms and film language construct the representation of women. In the first part of the term, attention will be paid to mainstream cinema's preoccupation with female sexuality as well as how it represents differences among women, especially differences of race, ethnicity, and class. Feminist perspectives on these issues will be emphasized, as will the critical and theoretical debates that have emerged around the cinema as a "male gaze" and the pleasures of female viewing. The remaining part of the course will be devoted to analyzing how women have used film for self-representation through both narrative and experimental filmmaking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 001 Introduction to New Media Studies.

Instructor(s): Sheila C Murphy (scmurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/366/001.nsf

This course surveys the technologies, representations, and experiences that constitute digital media culture. We will set out to understand the aesthetic, political, and cultural roles of digital media (or what is sometimes called ?new media?) by reading a diverse group of media scholars and entering into the debates around new technologies and the ways that we, as users of these technologies, imagine them. In this course, students will both use and analyze digital media.

Personal computers, the Internet, gaming systems, and other interactive digital technologies now make up a significant part of contemporary media culture. Meanwhile, older media like film and television are now routinely produced using digital technologies and methods. What is the nature of the relationship between these ?old? media and ?new? media? How do digital media technologies produce virtual experiences and realities? How do the digital and virtual impact or change our ideas about identity, community, the body, and experience? Throughout the term, we will consider these questions and analyze the ever-changing terrain of digital media as both critical users and theorists of digital media

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 400. Filmmaking II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Rayher (rray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 300 or equivalent experience in filmmaking and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, editing, and post-production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development being the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to film studies. You will have access to a state-of-the-art Panaflex 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in small groups to produce a substantial sync-sound final project, as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theater and Drama students). Evaluation: participation in in-class projects, production assignments, final project. Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 401. Video Art II.

Section 001 Documentary Practice. Students must elect FILMVID 320.002/003 concurrently.

Instructor(s): Stashu Kybartas (skybar@umich.edu), Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 301 or equivalent experience with video production and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/401/001.nsf

This is a co-requisite course with FILMVID 320 Documentary, which covers the theory and history aspects of nonfiction film and video. Students must take both courses, which allow them to thoroughly integrate documentary study and production. FILMVID 401 is geared toward experienced film/video concentrators who would like to explore and develop their own interests in documentary practice in dialog with inquiries into the ways in which artists and theorists have historically approached this mode of filmmaking. Students will refine video production skills learned in Video Art 1, and are expected to complete individual projects as well as participate in group exercises. Students will produce their own work and, if needed, crew for other class members. A top priority of the course is screening works-in-progress for critique. The linkage with FILMVID 320 will provide students a unique opportunity to bring practice into theory.

Enrollment is limited to 18

*Please note, students also must enroll(waitlist) in FILMVID 320.002 & 320.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2, 5, Permission of Department.

FILMVID 404. Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Visual Media.

Section 001 Dance Video. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Terri L Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: FILMVID 300, 301, 302, or 405; and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the films of Maya Deren to contemporary music video, this interdisciplinary course will explore the unique challenges of capturing dance on film and video and of creating a hybrid art form known as "videodance" or screen dance.

Working with students from the Department of Dance (Dance 462 Taught by Peter Sparling, Department of Dance), students will produce and direct a series of short videodance projects. This is a 3-credit course that counts as a production elective in the Film/Video concentration

Some prior experience with digital video production and editing is preferred.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 405. Computer Animation I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This digital media production course is a hands on investigation of the Macintosh computing environment and more specifically the moving image software used to create short, animated works, multi-media projects, video and motion graphics. Using graphics tools like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Macromedia Flash, Director and DV editing software, students will work individually and in small groups to make short, digital-cinema works. Emphasis is placed upon the fundamentals of the preception of motion over time, rotoscoping, digital photography, storyboarding and final output options of finished animations. Students should have a basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop and digital video.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 406. Computer Animation II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 405 or equivalent experience with video production, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced class explores the theories and applications of interactive animation design. Individual student projects are developed using Macromedia Director and Adobe Photoshop and Macromedia SoundEdit 16. Graphics, sound, and interactivity are utilized to create highly conceptual non-linear environments. Through critical analysis of both student assignments, and professional works, we will investigate the successes and failures of various types of interactivity to communicate with an audience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 410. Screenwriting II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 310. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/414/001.nsf

This is primarily a reading course designed to provide the student with an overview of how people through the twentieth century have thought about film. Theories of cinema offer a philosophical approach to understanding film as an art form. Starting with Hugo Munsterberg and Vachel Lindsay in the 1910s, students will read a wide range of theoretical approaches as they proceed through this 100 year history.

We will compare and contrast the viewpoints of influential thinkers on film such as Eisenstein and Bazin, as well as analyze recent commentary that takes up questions regarding film as a representation of culture, as a medium for narrating stories, as a source of psychological fascination, and as a technologically unique process. This course is required for concentrators in the program, but is open to all students with some background in film. Requirements include several papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are acquainted with the canonical texts of film theory, dating from the silent period up to the latest developments in multicultural and postmodern theory. The goal is both a familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and the improvement of student's analytic abilities as they approach film from the point of view of philosophy and social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 417. Screenwriting Master Class.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 310, current enrollment in FILMVID 410, and permission of the instructor. Limited to students whose screenwriting work is judged as outstanding. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Master class seminar with distinguished screenwriters. Course may vary in number of weeks and hours of commitment. Credit will vary accordingly. Students will receive one-on-one and small group instruction in screenwriting. Topics will vary depending upon the interests of the visiting artist. Students are selected on the basis of previous work in screenwriting. Application should be made to the Faculty Coordinator of the Screenwriting Curriculum, Program in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 423. Practicum for the Screenwriter.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Rayher (rray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, 310, and 410. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee may be required. May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course brings you together with the Program's most advanced screenwriters and actors from Theatre and Drama to spend the term making trailers and sequences. The goal of the course is to provide the screenwriters, the actors, and the production crew with the most integrated production environment possible, with lots of interaction between these three different domains. Everyone meets together to develop the projects. The writers will re-write based on feedback from the production crews and table readings of the scripts. The Production crew will work closely with the writer and actors to fashion a trailer from the full-length screenplay, and also work up a sequence, both of which will be filmed. This course is designed to provide you with the most in-depth experience of taking a screenplay and getting it successfully on the screen that the Program offers.

Pre-req.: FILMVID 400 or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 427. Screenwriting III.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 310, 410, and permission of the instructor. Limited to students whose work is judged as showing outstanding potential in writing for the screen. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced individual and small group instruction in screenwriting for select students who have completed basic screening (FILMVID 310) and intermediate screenwriting (FILMVID 410). Students will write a final draft of their revised original screenplay from FILMVID 410 and complete a first draft of a new feature length screenplay. The course will include staged readings of creative work and group discussions of same. This course is designed for students whose work has shown outstanding potential in the art of writing for the screen.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 001 Mexican & Brazilian Cinema.

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 360. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/441/001.nsf

Since the early 1990s, Mexican and Brazilian cinemas have experienced a resurgence to become the most vibrant national cinemas in Latin America in the early 21st century. New and older generations of filmmakers are experimenting with narrative and formal strategies as well as creative ways of producing and distributing their work within a new global framework that is still dominated by the major film studios based in Los Angeles. This course will take a comparative approach to the historical trajectories of these important national cinemas, focusing on six key trends that have shaped their global positioning and ability to deliver meaningful entertainment to the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking filmgoing population throughout the twentieth century:

  1. early attempts at artisanal production in provincial and metropolitan centers;
  2. the forging of national film genres in industries modeled after Hollywood during the forties and fifties;
  3. a politically engaged art cinema enjoying international distribution and critical acclaim in the 60s and early 70s;
  4. the popular, yet critically derided wave of "B" films that began in the industrial era and continued into the 80s;
  5. recent "post-industrial" commercial art cinema in the post-NAFTA, post-Collor era; and
  6. indigenous video production, both of which have been successfully distributed in Europe, Canada, and the United States.

Throughout our consideration of works by major men and women directors Emilio Fernández, Luis Buñuel, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, María Landeta, Mari Carmen de Lara, Arturo Ripstein, Alejandro González Iñárritu (Mexico), Nelson Pereira dos Santos, Luis de Barros, Carlos Reichenbach, Sergio Bianchi, Ana Carolina, Tizuka Yamasaki, Glauber Rocha, Tata Amaral (Brazil), we will study the influence in these cinemas of the enduring "love-hate" relationship with Hollywood, the dialogue with neorealist and surrealist currents in Europe, the central importance of documentary discourse and technique, and the premium placed on popular culture in the quest for film as the quintessential form of modern national expresson.

This course will be taught in English. Film diaries, a quiz, and a final research paper. Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 003 Italian Cinema. Meets with ITALIAN 315.001.

Instructor(s): Giorgio Bertellini (giorgiob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 360. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore key "moments" in Italian cinema, with the goal of understanding neorealist film practice as an alternative to CHC "realism"; the importance of Italian cinema to realist film theory; the importance of Italian cinema as a model for a cinema of political engagement and social criticism; the cultural and intellectual context out of which Italian cinema was produced (and viewed). The course will focus primarily on neorealist films and "the art film" of the post-1960 period, but we will also look at popular forms such as the commedia all Italiana, the spaghetti Western, the Supercolossi, and the horror genre. Films will include Bicycle Thieves, Ossessione, La Terra Trema, Voyage to Italy, The Easy Life, L'Eclisse, Teorema, Padre Padrone, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 442 / CAAS 442. Third World Cinema.

Section 001 Third World Cinema.

Instructor(s): Frances K Gateward (gateward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be a mix of documentary, shorts, and feature films from a variety of countries - including Singapore, Thailand, Angola, Senegal, Guatemala, Argentina, Cuba, Martinique, etc. There will be three papers for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 451 / AMCULT 490. American Film Genres.

Section 001 The Western and Science Fiction Film, and Beyond.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/490/001.nsf

See American Culture 490.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 460. Technology and the Moving Image.

Section 001 Video Games: Culture/Form.

Instructor(s): Sheila C Murphy (scmurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/filmvid/460/001.nsf

This course traces the history, aesthetics, and culture of video games from early text adventures to contemporary first-person shooter games. We will consider video game genres, narratives, gender and identity, and the influence of video games on mainstream media culture and Internet culture. We will also discuss the technological development of games and game systems and the video game industry in general, as well as how video games have had an impact upon the history of computers. From "Zork" to "Myst" to "Grand Theft Auto", we will seriously consider video games as an important cultural form of representation and interactivity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 480. Internship.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in Film and Video Studies. Permission of instructor required. (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration in Film/Video. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students will work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

Please note; does not count towards the Film/Video Concentration

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 485. The Global Screen.

Section 001 Interactions & Frictions in World Cinema/Media.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236 and one of: FILMVID 360, 441, 440, 442, CAAS 400, 442. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an exploration of the ways in which cinema and television from around the world intersect with the ongoing processes of globalization and transnationalism. We will explore these intersections from a variety of perspectives or sites including production, consumption, regulation, representation, and identity in order to map the contemporary transnational or global mediascape that confronts us today. In the past, the global cultural economy has been associated with the flow of western cultural products around the world, and the reception of those products has been investigated in terms of domination, resistance, and appropriation. But things are more complicated (confusing) today. Production, distribution, and reception take place in many sites around the world following the flow of capital, people, and information. Media transnationals address previously ignored or marginalized diasporic communities as new markets for specialized products. The diffusion of people across (trans)national boundaries both reinforces and forces revision of questions of national identity and cultural affilitation. This occurs not only at the level of spectatorship, but also at the level of production, There is a new type of filmmaker one that can no longer be subsumed within the category of national cinema, but, who like the texts themselves, is a product of migrancy and diasporic movement. In the broadest sense then, our task will be to explore how the transnational production and transmission of films and tv programs reveal the marks of these conditions thematically, aesthetically, and in their marketing strategies. Drawing on readings in film, media, and cultural theory, we will examine a number of texts across genres and types (documentaries, short films, feature films, tv sitcoms) against their instutitional context in order to understand the frictions and interactions that constitute the global screen. In keeping with the theme of the transnational, no one particular geopolitical area will be emphasized.

Instead, the following questions will guide our global journey: How do these audio/visual products address the issues of migrancy, exile, return, and homeland? How does the persistence of history maintain, alter/change in the face of a global imagination? How do differences in nationality, ethnicity, age, gender, class, and occupation shape one's experiences of globalization, migration, and transnationalism? What are the connections between globalization, transnationalism, and neocolonialism? How do developing countries accommodate the global and transnational pressures in their attempts at nation building? How do diasporic groups or communities negotiate the issues of cultural identity in this transnational landscape? What is the figure of the transnational filmmaker, and how do they position themselves and their work vis a vis the national and the transnational? How have the concepts of family/home/roots adapted to the influences of globalization, migration, and transnationalism? What are some ways of critiquing globalization and transnationalism?

The media products, their producers, and the institutions to be studied originate from a range of geopolitical regions including India, Africa, the multi-ethnic USA, Japan, China, Western Europe, and Latin America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 489. Senior Screenwriting Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 410 and permission of the instructor. Open to Dramatic Writing concentrators only. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to students in the Dramatic Writing concentration. Coursework consists of independent study in writing and refining a screenplay under the supervision of a faculty member.

In emphasizing a complete approach to the study, analysis, and creation of written dramatic texts, the Dramatic Writing concentration requires students to be engaged in the creation of dramatic texts intended for production and performance. This tutorial is provided as one of the options for a capstone experience for those students who choose the sequence in screenwriting within the Dramatic Writing concentration. It permits students to have the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in the process of creating a full-length screenplay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Acceptance as an Honors Candidate in Film and Video Studies. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee may be required. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of FILMVID 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to students taking Honors in the Program in Film and Video Studies. Students work independently with a faculty member in the Program on a thesis or on a film or video project during their senior year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 499(399). Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Does not count toward film-video concentration requirements. Laboratory fee may be required. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Must be approved by Program in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 500. Directed Study in Film and Video.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee may be required. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for FILMVID.


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