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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 11:41 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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Changes to Registration Procedures for Elementary Language Courses*

All students should be advised of the following changes in the Department of Romance Languages that may affect how they enroll in courses for Winter 2003.

  1. No waitlists. We have removed waitlists from all Romance Languages courses, which means that spaces may become available in all classes throughout the pre-registration process. If a particular section of a course is full, you should continue to monitor Wolverine Access because spaces may become available.
  2. New sections will open in most courses. The office staff will be monitoring enrollment and opening new sections of most elementary language courses.
  3. Contact the office for further assistance. If all sections of a course are full, please stop by 4108 MLB or e-mail rll.permissions@umich.edu with your Winter 2003 class schedule and the course you need to enroll in.

* Elementary language courses include: FRENCH 101, FRENCH 102, FRENCH 103, FRENCH 231, FRENCH 232, FRENCH 235, ITALIAN 101, ITALIAN 102, ITALIAN 103, ITALIAN 231, ITALIAN 232, SPANISH 101, SPANISH 102, SPANISH 103, SPANISH 231, SPANISH 232, SPANISH 275 and SPANISH 276.


FRENCH 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from FRENCH 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/101/002.nsf

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 103. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/102/001.nsf

See FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is the continuation of FRENCH 101. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in FRENCH 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 102. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/103/001.nsf

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the coordinator. Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be two hourly exams, three 25 minutes quizzes, a final exam, compositions, and two speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 111. FRENCH 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of FRENCH 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward midterm, students select several articles of a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students. They meet four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 004 – Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/235/005.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics, and culture through readings, videos, and CDs: 1. The "French Republic" 2. Europe: The European Union - The European Monetary Union 3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française" 4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS 5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption 6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision 7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%), and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 002 – Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Hoffmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/235/005.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics, and culture through readings, videos, and CDs: 1. The "French Republic" 2. Europe: The European Union - The European Monetary Union 3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française" 4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS 5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption 6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision 7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%), and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 005 – Political and Sociocultural Issues.

Instructor(s): Roger Eugene Butler-Borruat

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/french/235/005.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone politics, society, economics, and culture through readings, videos, and CDs: 1. The "French Republic" 2. Europe: The European Union - The European Monetary Union 3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française" 4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS 5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption 6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision 7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%), and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Women and Representation in Francophone West African Literature: Interculturality and the Fragmentation of Identity.

Instructor(s): Alain Mabankou (amabanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Maraima Ba's text So Long A Letter has been read again and again as a text that marks the first generation of West African women writers. This course studies new female voices from French-speaking West Africa. We will examine aesthetic shifts in women's literature as pursuits of political engagement. In particular, we will study the emergence of new female subjects in the selected texts. We will read narratives that dramatize and interrogate intercultural identity through the action of characters who must constantly negotiate their identity. At the core of this course are the effects of interculturality – that state of altered identity which finds its roots in the historical, geographic, and cultural ruptures of colonialism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003 – Les Pensées Cachées: Censorship During World War II.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the Vichy Regime, life in war-torn France was difficult on many levels. Collaboration with the Nazis was the only acceptable way to act in the open. Behind closed doors and on the printed page, it was another matter. Patriotism, although repressed, was rife; and in many instances it was members of the literary elite who were able to fool the censors and reach out to their compatriots in this time of confused allegiancies.

During the academic term, we will study texts and films written and produced under German censorship. We will try to discover just what and how was slipped by the watchful eyes of the censors – discovering the specific literary and artistic elements that helped the French maintain their patriotism and eventually triumph over the occupation of their beloved land. Modern censorship theory will lay the groundwork and provide us with a springboard from which to approach our texts. We will watch 2-3 films and read works or excerpts from authors such as: Sartre, DeBeauvoir, Saint-Exupery, Camus, Prevert, Valery, and Duras. Taught in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 004 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intensive study of a topic, theme, or genre in the literature and other cultural productions of French speaking peoples, providing an introduction to the methods and practice of literary and cultural study in the French language and opportunities for development of linguistic proficiency beyond the fourth term level.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Neighborhoods.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Neighborhoods and Other Spaces

Qu'est-ce qu'un quartier? Qui y vit? Qui n'y vit pas? Pourquoi? Dans ce cours, nous expliquerons comment le quartier diffère des autres espaces que nous occupons, comme le « chez soi » et la ville. Nous verrons comment la société française est structurée par les sphères privée et publique et en quoi elle ressemble et se différencie de la société américaine. Nous étudierons principalement la situation des diverses communautés (juive, gay, maghrébine, etc.) en France, leurs manières spécifiques d'occuper l'espace urbain, et comment les divisions spatiales reflètent les valeurs d'une société donnée.

Au programme: Textes littéraires, essais, articles de presse, films.
Travaux: Essais, écrits personnels, enquêtes de terrain.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 331. French Literature in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 – Mapping Paris through America and Africa. Meets with CAAS 358.006.

Instructor(s): Alain Mabanckou (amabanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. Not open to French concentrators. (3). (HU). Only one literature in translation course may be considered in the completion for the concentration requirements. May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Paris as the metropole has always fascinated everybody because so many of us are postcolonial subjects. Through their gaze and understanding of this city as the center, African and American writers have in their different ways critiqued the centralization of the French culture which excludes them culturally and literally. We will explore in this course the extent to which approaching this exclusion has actually been mediated through artistic creation.

Thus, in this course we will study works by African (such as Bernard Dadié) and American artists (such as James Baldwin) which discuss Paris as the site of hegemonic discourse. The goal is mapping the silenced relationship between Paris, Africa, and America. We will also analyze the way in which African, American, and French cultures are actually in opposition with each other while simultaneously being complementary.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • An African in Paris, (Novel) by Bernard Dadié
  • Giovanni's Room, (Novel) by James Baldwin.

FILMS:

  • The American President in Paris
  • La Noire de…
  • The Kiss of the Dragon.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in articulatory phonetics and French phonology. Students will also learn techniques for improving their own pronunciation or for their use in teaching French to others. We will examine the physiological characteristics of individual sounds (consonants, vowels, and semi-consonants), the relationship between the meaningful sounds of French and their orthographic representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "universal" French, and the most salient features in the pronunciation of selected regional varieties of French from within France and from other parts of the francophone world. Much of the focus of the course will be on rules governing syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion or retention of the "mute e". Students will have opportunities to apply theory to practice in class, but most oral production practice will be assigned as independent and regular work to be done with audiotapes outside of class.

Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, analyzing phonological problem sets and oral practice with the tapes. Written homework, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written final exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, recitation of 1-2 poems, and the final oral exam will be used to evaluate proficiency in pronunciation.

Prerequisite: Before enrolling in this class, students must have satisfactorily completed two courses taught in French beyond Fr. 235 or R.C. Fr. 320.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on written production and textual interpretation. It will enhance one's writing and interpretative skills in French.

Students will acquire linguistic, rhetorical, stylistic, narrative and prosodic tools indispensable in writing production and textual analysis. Course content will include use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, use of punctuation, essential rules of essay composition, analysis of prose and poetic literary texts and press articles.

The final grade will be based on several written exercise (30%), two quizzes (20%), three 3-4 page essays (30%), and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Francophone Caribbean Literature: Reading Dany Laferrière's texts.

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines time and space in the writing of Dany Laferrière. He was born in Port-au Prince in 1953 and currently lives in Miami. His writing career began in Quebec with the novels Comment faire l'amour avec un Nègre sans se fatiguer (1985), Éroshima (1987), L'odeur du café (1991), Le goût des jeunes filles (1992); Cette grenade dans la main du jeune Nègre est-elle une arme ou un fruit? (1993), and Chronique de la dérive douce (1994). These novels deal with the immigrant experience of racial difference, degradation, and exclusion. In this course, we will concentrate on questions of race, class, and gender, as well as issues of sexuality and politics. During the semester, Dany Laferriere will come to the class to discuss his work with us.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 369. Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Paris, Capital of the 19th Century.

Instructor(s): Michele Hanoosh

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The grandiose, hyperbolic title of Walter Benjamin's famous essay of 1935 will provide a point of departure for this interdisciplinary course on the representation of Paris in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century French literature, and its crucial importance in formulating the experience of modernity. Special attention will be paid to the features of urban experience and the means of representing these; the role of key Parisian figures such as the flâneur and the crowd; the relation of the city to the fantastic and the grotesque; the place of technology, advertising, fashion, public spaces (shopping arcades, grands boulevards, railway stations, etc.); the significance of recurrent metaphors for Paris (hell, the female body, illness, the machine); and the nature of meaning, reality, representation, and communication in the modern urban context. While based on literary works, the course will also incorporate material from history, the visual arts, and urban theory (Benjamin, Lefèbvre, Certeau).

The final grade will be based on two papers, a final exam, and the quality of class participation.

Readings:

  • Balzac, Histoire des trieze: Ferragus and La Fille aux yeux d'or (Livre de poche);
  • Michel de Certeau, "Marches dans la ville," from L'invention du qoutidien, Pt. III (photocopy);
  • Baudelaire, Tableaux parisiens, from Les fleurs du mal (Livre de poche); Le Spleen de Paris, selections (Garnier-Flammarion); L'Homme des foules, translation of Poe's "The Man of the Crowd" (photocopy); "Le Peintre de la vie moderne" (photocopy);
  • Flaubert, L'Éducation sentimentale (Livre de poche);
  • Zola, L'Assommoir (Folio);
  • Henri Lefèbvre, selections from La Production de l'espace (photocopy);
  • Proust, Un Amour de Swann, from Du côté de chez Swann (Folio); and
  • Benjamin, "Paris, capitale du XIXe siècle" (photocopy).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 378. Studies in Genre.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – Holocaust, Deportation, and the Invention of Postwar France.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read a selection of testimonies written in French by Holocaust and concentration camps survivors. It will include major texts by Elie Wiesel (a Hungarian Jew), Jorge Semprun (a communist), David Rousset (a trotskist), Charlotte Delbo (a woman from the French resistance), and Pierre Seel (a gay man), as well as Alain Resnais' film Nuit et brouillard and parts of Claude Lanzmann's Shoah. Beyond the issues of representation raised by the texts and movies themselves, we will discuss how the memory of the camps was also determined by the historical context in which these testimonies appeared. What does it tell us about the way French society (re)constructed itself after WW II? How has history been used, and sometimes forgotten, to serve specific social and political needs?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – Meets with Business Administration 415.001 and 415.451.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 380. A maximum of six credits of FRENCH 380, 414, and BA 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered as the continuation in the French Business sequence, which begins with French 380 (Intermediate Business French). FR380 is not a pre-requisite and may not be taken following FR414.

During this class, we will deepen our linguistic and cultural awareness of the French-speaking business world. We will study and practice both written and spoken commercial French within their true cultural context.

Themes covered during the semester will include banking, advertising, product marketing, claims and disputes, company organization and hierarchy. The mechanics of job application in French will be covered in detail as will possible scenarios encountered once accepted into a company.

Required written assignments will concentrate on commercial correspondence, stressing the traditional nature of written business French. Oral work will include the practice of communication and integration in both formal and social business settings.

A series of business culture videos will be viewed and used to direct discussion about the differences (both perceived and real) between business interactions in the francophone world and the U.S.

Texts:
Parlons Affaires
Le Français Commercial
Course Pack

Attendance is mandatory. No auditors. Maximum enrollment is 25.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 466. Literature of the Twentieth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Parisian Blues: The Interwar Period.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The period that separates the two world wars in France is usually defined by contrast – between the frivolous extravaganzas of the 20's, and the somber, violent mood of the 30's. And indeed, the financial crash of 1929 provides a literal closing to a spell of exuberant spending and consumption. In this course we will focus, however, on what the 20's and 30's have in common, in spite of their contrasting appearances, namely a deep sense of anxiety and insecurity. The near-defeat France experienced in the First World War generated a wide-spread unease about the country's role as a (colonial) world power, its cultural pre-eminence, and national identity. To probe this social malaise, we will examine some of the cultural productions of the interwar period, especially those in which aesthetic and sexual experiment coexist with, or betray a sense of deadlock and confinement. Readings will include poems by Cendrars, Desnos, and Eluard; surrealist novels (Breton's Nadja, and Crevel's Babylon); V. Margueritte's "La Garçonne," and Colette's La Vagabonde, and essays by Breton, Bataille, and Artaud. Other forms of representation (painting, photography, and film), and cultural production (exhibitions, music-hall, ballet) will also be discussed, depending on the students' background and interests. Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussion, and two 10-page essays.

Essays may be written in either English or French, but they need to undergo a series of revisions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (FRENCH 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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