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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 11:42 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty German 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac)Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/german/102/001.nsf

German 102 is the continuation of German 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Textbook
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, or 102. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/german/103/001.nsf

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty German 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500
Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
  • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning, McGraw-Hill
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., CD-Rom, Prentice-Hall
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Tutorial Software – Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 172. History of German Cinema.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/german/172/001.nsf

This course surveys the history of the German cinema from its beginnings through the 1990s. We will look at films from the Weimar period, such as The Cabinet of Dr. Calegari and Nosferatu. We will ask how the Nazi Cinema generated its political messages through a careful blend of ideology and entertainment, which in many respects persisted well into the 1950s, and we will look at landmark productions from the DEFA film studios in East Germany, as well as of the New German Cinema in the West, where directors such as Wim Wenders and Rainer Werner Fassbinder rose to fame in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, we will examine the current state of German cinema by looking at some recent productions. In addition to the historical survey, the course also serves as a basic introduction to the study of film. Taught in English; reading knowledge and listening comprehension of German welcome, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 206. Conversation Practice.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 230. Intensive Second-Year Course.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine Alice Marquardt (cmarquar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

This is an intensive intermediate course, equivalent to two terms of second-year college German, which will reinforce and extend the grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and reading skills developed in first-year German. There will be a wide variety of readings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary, historical, philosophical, and scientific texts, and students will read (and watch the movie version of) a humorous novel about growing up in the DDR, Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee. There will also be an entertaining and interesting variety of German movies and videos. The course proceeds at a rapid pace, so regular attendance is imperative. Other course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. By the end of the course, students should be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the department and the Office of International Programs in this regard.

Required Texts:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Thomas Brussig: Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenallee (available at the bookstores)

Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

Recommended Texts for "Reading Journals"

  • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
  • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
  • Frisch, Max, Andorra, Suhrkamp
  • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt, as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main GERMAN 221/231 course page]:

  • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
  • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
  • Frisch, Max, Andorra, Suhrkamp
  • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
  • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

In this course, students complete the fourth-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several "special topics" courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Philosophy, History, or Science, in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German in this field throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course.

Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study, and students can emerge from GERMAN 232 with genuine pride in what they are able to do with their German. More generally, by the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

The special topics and course requirements for this term's sections are given below.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 001 – Contemporary German Society and Business Culture.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/

While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 002 – Contemporary German Society and European Union.

Instructor(s): Peggy M Wunderwald-Jensen (pwjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While building a topic-oriented vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading and discussing a variety of authentic texts dealing with Germany's geography, economic situation, the situation of foreigners, the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society. Furthermore, students will get an insight into the evolution, the decision-making process, and current issues of the European Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 003 – Mozart's Magic Flute.

Instructor(s): Vanessa Helen Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ever heard of the 'Mozart effect'? Taking this course will make you smarter and learning German easier! Besides covering topics such as, 'What is genius?' and 'Why is Mozart so famous?', you'll gain an in-depth knowledge of Mozart's opera The Magic Flute (Die Zauberflöte). You'll improve your written and spoken German, do a comprehensive grammar review, compare productions of the opera, and watch a number of films. You will also learn to sing the opera and perhaps take part in a concert at the end of the term. There will be guest lectures on subjects ranging from conducting, costume and lighting design to Freemasonry and Zoroastrianism. The assessment for this course will be based on participation, weekly writing and grammar assignments, and a midterm and final test. The only prerequisite for this course is enthusiasm. To see excerpts from a past Magic Flute concert, go to: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/gs-ug-mozart.html

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 004 – Mathematical and Scientific German.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/Kursseite.html

This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German – practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 005 – Mathematical and Scientific German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/Kursseite.html

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German – practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Required Text:

    • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts:

    • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
    • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 006 – Classics of German Literature.

    Instructor(s): Ulrike Peters (upeters@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This section offers an introduction to German literature through the reading of some of the most important texts in German (as well as world) literature. Our readings will proceed backwards, from Heiner Mueller (20th century) to Lessing (18th century), including other eminent authors like Kafka, Heine, Goethe, and Schiller.

    Through these texts, we will not only deal with literary history, but also touch upon political and social developments, and central issues of German culture. In pursuit of this goal we will read the texts at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity for understanding their meaning and learn how to discuss them under a large variety of aspects and perspectives. This means that class participation is mandatory, and, in order to improve both speaking and writing skills in German, a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

    Text used: Frisch, Max. Andorra.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 007 – Introduction to German Film.

    Instructor(s): Dorothea M Von Herder (dvherder@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 008 – Legal German: Trials and Constitution.

    Instructor(s): Carsten Hoppe (hoppec@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will provide students with an introduction to German legal vocabulary and the German constitution, the Grundgesetz. The introduction to the German legal system will include comparisons to the U.S. legal system, mock trials and debates on legal issues, and discussions of trials that captured the public imagination. The course will begin with a unit on the Nuremberg trials and their impact on the framing of the German constitution. There will also be a unit on changes in the legal system in response to terrorism in the 60s, 70s and early 80s as well as after September 11.

    Course materials will include background readings in English and original German documents, as well as a number of feature films and court transcripts and footage available on the world wide web.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 243. Faust.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts; tr. Arndt); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend (tr. Lowe-Porter); and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. No knowledge of German required (but German concentrators will be required to read Goethe and Mann in the original).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition.

    Section 001, 002.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

    Recommended Text: Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Fourth Edition. Chicago: McGraw-Hill, 2002.

  • Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 306. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

    In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

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    GERMAN 307. German for Medicine.

    Section 001 – [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

    Instructor(s): Susanne Heike Vees-Gulani (vees@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Mini/Short course

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In this course, students will read a variety of texts of special interest to students interested in studying medicine. Readings will be taken from newspaper articles on medical issues, from scientific and medical textbooks used by Medizinstudenten at German universities, and from medical journals. Class time will be devoted to clarification of the content of the readings, and, where applicable, to a discussion of theoretical and ethical issues raised by the texts. Course requirements include thorough reading of 2-10 pages of German per week; weekly journal entries on the readings (graded for content, not grammar); development of a "personalized" vocabulary list, 20 words per week, tested every three weeks; attendance and participation; a 15-minute presentation, and a written version thereof to be handed in at the end of the term.

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    GERMAN 308. Preparation for Study Abroad.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu), Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    "Study Abroad" is especially designed for, but not limited to, students who intend to participate in the University of Michigan's Academic Year in Freiburg (AYF) program. The course will meet one hour per week. Class hours will be devoted to presentations by faculty members and former AYF students on all aspects of German university life, travel in Germany, German politics, geography, history, food, holidays, social customs, medical care, the new monetary system, linguistic and cultural diversity, and LSA requirements relating to study abroad. These presentations will be given in English. Required are: regular attendance, an oral presentation in German on some aspects of Freiburg, and a paper in German. Grades will be based on preparation and participation.

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    GERMAN 311. Performance Workshop in Nürnberger Fastnachtspiele.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103. (1). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    A performance workshop in 16th century German play-texts, leading to a program of Nürnberger Fastnachtspiele to be presented in the Carnival season, from the end of February to the beginning of March. The program will include two quack doctor plays by Hans Sachs (Das Narrenschneiden, 1536 and Der Schwanger Bawer mit dem fuel, 1559) together with Hans Folz' short dialogue Der Bauernhandel (c. 1495). Attention will be paid to the historical context of Carnival in Nürnberg, grotesque comedy in the Nürnberger graphic arts of the time, and the qualities of 16th century Franconian German. (The course meets at the Max Kade German Residence.) German 311 is intended to expand options available for Kade residents as a way of building further community and further enhancing language skills.

    All students involved will be acting (in German) in one or more public performances, as well as assisting in the design and execution of the production as a whole.

    Course requirements: Full participation in all workshop sessions and any extra rehearsals called. Assume a role in the production as actor or member of production team (assist. director/ props & costumes, etc.)

    Intended audience: The course is intended primarily but not exclusively for students in the Max Kade German Residence Program.

    2 hours per week for approximately 8 weeks. Performance workshop

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    GERMAN 322 / HISTORY 322. The Origins of Nazism.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu) , Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

    R&E

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/322/001.nsf

    See History 322.001.

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    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 001 – Brecht's Die Dreigroschenoper.

    Instructor(s): Vanessa Helen Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Explore the seamy side of Germany during the 1920s. In this course, we look at the ways in which Bertolt Brecht's comic opera, Die Dreigroschenoper (‘The Three Penny Opera'), formed a basis for topical commentary on bourgeois society, love, sexuality, fashion, politics, poverty, and urban life during the Weimar period. The course provides background information on Germany between the World Wars, and, against this backdrop, we examine music as a critical response to changing social and political conditions. We will examine Brecht's biography and influence on later writers and dramatists, and discuss Brecht's radical contributions to the theater – for example his notions of episches Theater (‘epic' theater) and Verfremdung (the 'alienation' effect). In addition to improving written, spoken and comprehension German skills, a large part of the course will be devoted to singing and performing Kurt Weill's music and reflecting on its jazz influences. At the end of the academic term, we'll put on a concert and perform selections from the opera. The assessment will be based on class participation, weekly writing and grammar assignments and a number of tests. Other than a willingness to participate, there are no music prerequisites. Die Dreigroschenoper follows on from the GERMAN 232 course on Mozart's Zauberflöte.

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    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 002 – German Youth Cultures.

    Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz @umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Love Parade, Fanta4, Crazy: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear quickly. They stress difference, creativity, and – above all – individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetics are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class.

    This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities, and political orientations of youths within the last ten years. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, literature), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this "deutsche Besonderheit – der Mythos Jugend" (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, essays, short quizzes, engaged class participation, motivated physical and oral presence.

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    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 003 – German for Engineering II.

    Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will introduce students to German engineering discourse. It is designed to prepare students for internships and jobs requiring some knowledge of technical German, and for study abroad in a technical field in a German-speaking country. We will read and discuss texts on "how things work" and sections of textbooks on Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. We will watch videos produced by BMW and Opel, videos about recycling processes, etc., and we will make extensive use of the web. The course will also include guest lectures by faculty from technical fields and by visitors from industry. Vocabulary building will be emphasized strongly; grammar will be reviewed as needed. There will be a lot of partner and small group work during class time, in order to maximize students' opportunities to practice speaking and to help each other master the material.

    Student tasks and the instructor's expectations will be based on the assumption that the majority of students will previously have had the equivalent of four academic terms (or more) of college German, and that students are open to and interested in the study of scientific and technical concepts, but the course has no specific scientific or technical prerequisites. In particular, it is not necessary to have previously taken German for Engineering I in order to enroll in this course: German for Engineering I and German for Engineering II cover different materials and can be taken in any order.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 004 – World According to Alma.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    At the dawn of the 20th century, Alma Schindler was regarded as the most beautiful, talented, and intelligent woman in all Vienna. As we read her autiobiography, Mein Leben, we look into the lives and works of artists, writers, composers, musicians and political figures whom she influenced, including her several spouses (Gustav Mahler, Walther Gropius, Franz Werfel) and intimate friends and lovers. We try to understand how art could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos, as Vienna – the city of dreams – came to embrace German Fascism. Readings from Alma's autobiography are supplemented by videos; paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele; musical compositions by herself, Gustav Mahler, Alexander von Zemlinsky, Richard Strauss, Alban Berg, Maurice Ravel, Hanz Pfitzner, Arnold Schönberg, Ernst Krenek; and passages from works by writers such as Georg Büchner, Franz Werfel, Heinrich Mann, Thomas Mann, Bertha Zuckerkandl, Franz Kafka, and others.

    The underlying framework of the course is the political transformation of Europe, from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to and beyond Fascism.

    Class time is devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to and discussing music (songs, symphonies and operas), discussing representative works by contemporary authors, and surveying the political events of the time.

    Requirements: at least three oral presentations in class, one two-page essay every second week, a 15-page term-paper, and active participation in class discussions. Alles auf Deutsch, natürlich. Matters of German grammar, style, pronunciation etc. are treated according to the needs of the students. Since students are exposed to far more than they can possibly learn, there are no quizzes, no tests, no final exam – students choose what they want to learn and write about it.

    Required text:

    • a course pack, available at Accu-Copy.

    Optional but recommended:

    • Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage
    • a good German-English/English-German dictionary

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    GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

    Section 005 – Biological Sciences and Medicine in Context.

    Instructor(s): Susanne Heike Vees-Gulani (vees@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will explore the role of the biological sciences and medicine in the German speaking world, their influence on the development of the respective fields, and the ethical questions related to them. We also will study the interaction between science and medicine with other areas, such as literature, philosophy, and culture. Readings and discussions focus on texts by and about Hildegard von Bingen, Mendel, Koch, Röntgen, and Freud, on topics such as Nazi medicine, gene manipulation, cloning, and embryonic stem cell research, as well as some literary and philosophical texts. Along the way, we will develop a biological and medical vocabulary and enhance German reading, writing, and speaking skills. Grade assessment is based on participation and homework, oral presentations, essays, and quizzes. No knowledge of science or medicine is assumed.

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    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    GERMAN 349. Working in Germany.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Peggy M Wunderwald-Jensen (pwjensen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 231. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is designed for students planning to go on a summer internship in Germany. Students will become familiar with cultural differences between Germany and the U.S., both in everyday life and in a work environment. We will hear from other students about their experiences. We also will talk about practical issues such as finding housing, buying a train ticket, and traffic regulations.

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    GERMAN 350. Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as:

    • the geography of business in German;
    • the European Union and Germany's roll therein;
    • trade;
    • traffic and transportation;
    • marketing;
    • industry;
    • money and banking; and
    • ecology.

    In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams; a number of short reports, papers, and projects; and a final exam. The language of instruction is German.

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    GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will give credit to a student for the completion of an internship in a German-speaking country.

    Requirements for receiving credit are as follows:

    1. The student will complete an eight-week (minimum) internship in a German-speaking country before registering for these three credits.
    2. The student will then complete a report/paper of at least 20 typed pages in German on this experience.
      1. Part 1 of the paper will describe the location of the internship. It will include information on the geography, history, population, major industries, social structure, politics, and culture of the area.
      2. Part 2 of the paper will be a 2 –3 page description of the company or organization where the internship was completed. This part will include the elements of a "company presentation": location, history, major changes and developments, industrial branch, products, present legal form, number of employees, yearly turn-over, recent developments.
      3. Part 3 of the paper will be the student's personal account of the internship experience. This part should start with a description of a typical day for the intern: work hours, the facilities, the department, typical duties and activities, superiors, support staff, and co-workers, technologies, special events. If applicable, the student will compare and contrast the working situation and work-relationships in the United States and the location of the internship, noting similarities and differences between the two. The student may also include a description of the housing, as well as pictures and descriptions of travels or other non-work related activities and other mementos of the internship.
      4. Finally, the student will include a copy of any written summary or recommendation provided by the company upon the completion of the internship, as well as copies of thank-you letters written by the student to the company/department and to the landlord.
    3. During the registered term, the student will also make a ten-minute presentation in German about the internship experience to Business German students and potential interns.

    No regular class meetings are scheduled.

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    GERMAN 382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course provides an introduction to German drama of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting aesthetic, cultural, and political shifts during the period. We will pay special attention to the role of history, science, and sex. Readings include plays by Büchner Woyzeck, Wedekind Frühlings Erwachen, Brecht Mutter Courage, and Frisch Andorra. The course is taught in German with occasional English excursions.

    Requirements: two papers (~8pp), attendance, participation.

    In conjunction with GERMAN 381, 383, 384, or 385, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or teaching minor.

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    GERMAN 385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present.

    Section 001 – Taboos: The Forbidden in 19th and 20th-Century German Literature.

    Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    What are society's dos and don'ts? What constitutes socially and politically acceptable behavior? What can taboos tell us about the transformation of German society?

    This course examines the way in which nineteenth- and twentieth-century German literature deals with taboos that disrupt or reinforce the social, political, and moral order. We look at literary manifestations of, for example, the anarchist, 'Emanze', homosexual, collaborator, whore, cannibal, 'bastard', divorcee, at the suicidal, the incestuous and polygamous.

    The course includes:

    • Grimm fairy tales,
    • Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter,
    • Wedekind's Frühlings Erwachen,
    • Freud's Der Ödipuskomplex and Totem und Tabu,
    • Kafka's Die Verwandlung and Der Hungerkünstler,
    • excerpts from Erica Fischer's Aimée und Jaguar and Christa Wolf's Der geteilte Himmel.

    The syllabus also looks at German rock, and covers films such as Tod in Venedig, and Lola und Billidikid.

    Taught in German, the course is designed to improve intermediate-level written and spoken German.

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    GERMAN 385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present.

    Section 002 – Kafka.

    Instructor(s): Gesa Schneider (gesa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This seminar will allow us to study one of the key figures of 20th-century literature, Franz Kafka. We will begin with his short stories, such as Der Hungerkünstler Bericht an eine Akademie, Der Landarzt and In der Strafkolonie and then read the first chapters of his fragment – novel Der Verschollene (also known as Amerika). Film adaptations of Kafka's work will also be consided. We will read slowly, which will allow us to explore the author's writings in greater depth while simultaneously questioning our own practice of reading. The goal of the seminar is not only to enhance abilities to speak and write in German, but furthermore to become familiar with methods of literary analysis. Requirements: two short oral presentations, essays, final paper. Language: German.

    Required texts (Available at Shaman Drum):

    • Kafka, Franz: Erzahlungen
    • Kafka, Franz: Der Veschollene

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    GERMAN 406. Conversation Practice.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

    The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the GERMAN 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

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    GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

    All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

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    GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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    GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 350, or one 300-level courses beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The goals of GERMAN 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

    This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

    This term, GERMAN 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 432 / SOC 425. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Since the 19th century, the political economy of Germany has developed a particular form of capitalism said to display uniquely German features. After providing some historical background and orientation, this seminar will focus mainly on the postwar Germanys and will cover the development of the West German political system, welfare state, and industrial relations, as well as the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) and challenges of reunification. The course is designed for German and social science concentrators with an interest in political economy. Assignments may include weekly presentations and short analysis papers, as well as a major research paper at the end.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

    German Literature and Culture in English

    Section 001 – Literature for Psychologists. Meets with COMPLIT 384.001 and PSYCH 401.004.

    Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Comparative Literature 384.001.

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    GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

    Section 001 – New Women, New Novels.

    Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course explores the role of literature in the history of the Women's Movement. Focusing mainly on novels published in Germany since the end of the 19th Century, we will look at the way literary discourses have participated in the transformation of gender roles. From its beginnings in the late 19th century until its last peak in the 1960s, the German Women's Movement looked for literature that could lead the way to new forms of femininity. Throughout the century, feminist theorists and writers have explored the utopian dimension of literary discourse. They have searched for heroines who could bridge the gap between the traditional 19th-century stereotype of woman as "angel in the house" and the as yet unrealized world of future possibilities for women with full citizenship, educational, political, and sexual freedom. To explore the role of women's literature in articulating the New Women we will closely analyze the representational strategies of the novels and shortstories (by Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, Ricarda Huch, Gabriele Reuter, Helene Stöcker, Irmgard Keun und Marieluise Fleißer) themselves as well as their reception by contemporary feminists, other literary critics, and the growing (female) reading public. Readings, class discussions, and essay assignments will be in German.

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    GERMAN 459. The Literature of the German Democratic Republic.

    Section 001 – Growing up in East Germany.

    Instructor(s): Julia C Hell (hell@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Before the fall of the wall in 1989, few West Germans were interested in the GDR. The country on the other side of the Iron Curtain just seemed strange, perhaps a little boring, definitely inaccessible. This attitude changed when the East German state suddenly disappeared. Now West Germans wanted to know what it was like to live under a dictatorship, to be a member of the communist party's youth organization, not to be able to travel freely. When it became apparent that the reality in the East was both less horrifying and more complex than the West had imagined, the interest quickly faded again. Not so on the part of East Germans: people wanted to know where they had been living, what their lives had been like, what they had gained, and what they had lost. There was a veritable explosion of autobiographies, novels, and films about life in East Germany. In this course, we will read literary and non-literary texts about East Germany and what it felt like to grow up in the East. These texts will be supplemented by scholarly articles by historians, sociologists, and political scientists on the GDR.

    Prerequisites: this is an advanced undergraduate course, which requires advanced reading knowledge. Students will be graded on their active participation (which will involve in-class presentations assigned on a regular basis) and two exams: one take-home exam, one in-class exam.

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    GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Frederick Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

    Section 001 – German Ethnicities in Literature and Film.

    Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Who is 'German' and to what extent do 'German ethnicities' exist today? Who defines what 'belongs' and what is 'foreign'? In this course we will discuss contemporary literature and film in which various forms of 'Germanness' are explored: the work of African-German, Jewish-German, Turkish-German, Romani-German, and Japanese-German writers will be at the center of our interest (May Ayim, Renan Demirkan, Sinasi Dikmen, Fahimeh Farsaie, Barbara Honigmann, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Ceija Stojka, Yoko Tawada, Feridun Zaimoglu). We will watch and discuss some of the promising new films of German cinema such as Fatih Akin's Kurz und Schmerzlos, Kutlug Ataman's Lola und Billidikid, and Doris Dörrie's Happy Birthday, Türke. We also will listen to Turkish-German hiphop and rap, discuss multicultural theater and cabaret, and talk about various approaches to ethnic communities in Germany. This course will provide essential background information for gaining an understanding of the multiplicity of cultures in Germany today. Students will be required to discuss films and texts in German, give oral presentations, write short essays and a term paper based on the weekly readings. This course can be taken for graduate credit.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 512. Introduction to Middle High German.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The period in the evolution of the German language called Middle High German, from roughly 1050 to 1350 AD, is characterized by the spread of literacy from the clergy to some segments of the German-speaking nobility and emerging merchant class. This expanding access to the written word had a profound effect on the nature, content, and function of written texts, and the increased production of written texts provides a far more detailed picture of linguistic diversity than had been the case previously, revealing extensive changes taking place in the German dialects even as tendencies toward standardization begin to appear. The primary goal of the course is to learn to read the texts, in edited as well as original manuscript format. As we read the texts, we identify changes underway in all levels of the language, and attempt to evaluate them in terms of theories of language change and language contact. We investigate the social, political, economic, and intellectual trends and events of the day that impinge upon our linguistic analysis.

    The course is designed primarily for graduate students, but qualified undergraduates are welcome. Graduate students write a research paper on some aspect of the language, and give an oral presentation on their research. Undergraduates may substitute a final examination for the research paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Graduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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