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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 11:25 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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HISTORY 111. Modern Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Had Europeans in 1700 had access to a time-machine they might have felt more comfortable visiting their Roman ancestors than coming to see their descendants today. This course will try to demonstrate why. We will survey the transformations in European society and culture in the last 300 years, examining not only familiar agents of change (war, revolution, technology) but some that are less often discussed (novels, photography, film). We will examine as well how Europeans tried to shape the lives of peoples in other parts of the world and how in turn those peoples returned the favor. Finally, we will consider the very notion of "Europe" and "Europeans," and how they evolved over an era of shifting alligiances and identities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 122 / ASIAN 122. Modern East Asia.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Lee, Mark C Elliott

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/122/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to the history of East Asia from 1800 to the present. The primary focus will be on the Chinese experience, with comparative reference to Japan and Korea. The course explores the interrelations between politics, economy, society, and culture in the context of an emergering world sytem and seeks to understand the problematic transformation to nationhood and "modernity." This is a continuation of HISTORY 121/ASIAN 121; that course, however, is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maris A Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Required readings may be purchased at Shaman Drum and are on reserve at the UGLI.

  • Mary Beth Norton, et al., A People and a Nation: A History of the United States to 1877
  • William Bruce Wheeler and Susan D. Becker, Discovering the American Past: A Look at the Evidence
  • Betty Wood, The Origins of American Slavery: Freedom and Bondage in the English Colonies
  • Joy Day Buel and Richard Buel, Jr., The Way of Duty: A Woman and Her Family in Revolutionary America
  • William Otter, History of My Own Times
  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself
  • Robert Hunt Rhodes, ed., All for the Union: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Elisha Hunt Rhodes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David John Fitzpatrick (fitzd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second half of the basic, introductory survey of American history. It addresses the development of the American nation from the end of the Civil War to the present day. The focal point of the course is the changing nature of the concept of freedom during this period. In this context the course will examine the evolution of the United States from an agrarian nation with little concern for foreign affairs to the world's preeminent power with self-defined global interests. This examination necessarily will focus on the lives of individual citizens, the transformation of the labor force and the workplace, and the role played by race, ethnicity, class, and gender in determining one's place within the greater society. In so doing the course will investigate the era's major reform movements as well as the reasons for and reaction to the nation's increased involvement in international affairs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Political Culture in Cold War America.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/196/001.nsf

Topical introduction to the popular culture and domestic politics of the Cold War era, with an emphasis on viewing modern American history through mass media forms such as television, novels, science fiction, and especially Hollywood films. The course will examine the psychological impact of the nuclear era, and the half-century global power struggle between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, through a focus on the intersection of popular and political culture on the American home front. This is not a course about warfare, but instead about the historical possibilities of examining personal anxieties and public mythologies through a cultural analysis of Cold War America. Themes include the dawn of the atomic age, the changing imagination of the frontier, the boundaries of political dissent, the problems of historical memory, the privatization of suburban family life, and the cultural responses to key episodes such as McCarthyism, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, Reagan's "Evil Empire," and the Gulf War. Probable films include Atomic Café, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Twilight Zone, Dr. Strangelove, The Wild Bunch, Red Dawn, The Manchurian Candidate, The Graduate, Platoon, and The Big Lebowski. The class meets for four hours each week because films will be screened during the Tuesday section, while discussion of the film and reading assignments will occur on Thursdays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Women and Gender in South Africa.

Instructor(s): Catherine Burns

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/196/002.nsf

This seminar course is aimed at students who wish to understand and explore the dynamics, past and present, of women's lives and of gender relations in one of the most interesting and dynamic societies on planet Earth. Two stark facts animate this seminar course: After 1994, at the close of the Apartheid era, the new South Africa adopted a "world first" Constitution, with a Bill of Rights and Constitutional Clauses guaranteeing all women equality in every respect with men, and guaranteeing gender equality and equality of sexual orientation as basic rights of citizenship. At the same time as this final Constitution was adopted into law, South African police and national agencies began publishing data showing that the country has the highest reported rate of rape, sexual assault and violence against women and girl children in the world. Across the country organizations and movements are responding by targeting current gender ideologies and practices. Gender equality activists in general, and historians of women and gender in particular, have been tasked as never before with exploring the roots of this current crisis:

  • What pre-colonial, colonial, early and late 20th-century gender relations produced the patchwork of patriarchies shaping these current contradictions?
  • How have the centuries of land dispossession, racial capitalism, settler immigration, waves of labour migration, and the forms and timing of industrial growth, youth, worker and civic revolution, social conflict, state violence, armed insurgency, political negotiation, cultural change, and national re-building created this legacy of violent gender hierarchy in the midst of Constitutional egalitarianism?
  • How have masculine identities (divided in history by class, race, and region) reinforced one another so that, according to recent scholarship, a hegemonic authoritarian masculinity has been one of the most powerful legacies of Apartheid and its precursors?
  • What role have women from differing social and economic groupings, often divided against one another, played in this?

In this seminar course we will explore the complex and often subtle ways African women, women of Indian origin, women of mixed background, and settler women defended, sustained, and generated their own households and productive resources, and played a role in defining wider communities, and created their relationships with men. Throughout the course, we hope to juxtapose the hardships and inequalities suffered by women, with the history of women as active, courageous participants in local and regional struggles to gain economic, social, and personal justice. Our last weeks will take in new work in the emerging field of South African masculinity studies, and a published collection on the often hidden lives of gay and lesbian South Africans over the last several hundred years.

FORMAT: Our discussions will be based on the close reading of a number of sources including journal articles, life histories, and historical texts. Each participant will be expected to produce two papers. The first will be a briefer paper in which the student responds to a particular question based on issues and arguments in the joint body of readings. The second paper will be a longer project developed around each student's particular interests, in conjunction with the instructor, using both published and primary materials.

Class Reading base around these edited volumes and life studies:
Women and Gender in Southern Africa to 1945 (edited) Cherryl Walker (1990.);
Changing Men in Southern Africa, edited by Robert Morrell (2001);
Defiant desire: gay and lesbian lives in South Africa (eds) M. Gevisser and E. Cameron (1995);
Ramphele, Mamphela, Across boundaries: the journey of a South African woman leader (1995) and
Mashinini, Emma, Strikes have followed me all my life (1990).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 Medieval Geographies.

Instructor(s): Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the inhabitants of Europe envision their world in the millennium between the fall of Rome in the fifth century and the discovery of new continents in the fifteenth? In this course we will consider the order of the medieval Christian cosmos which placed the Earth rather than the Sun at the center of the universe; we will study ways in which the geography of that Earth was mapped and the ways in which boundaries were established and territorial space given meaning; and we will consider also the ways in which people perceived those who lived beyond their own territorial boundaries, how, for example, the English viewed the Welsh or Europeans, the Mongols. Finally, we will give some consideration to the ways the understanding and representation of the world changed in the fifteenth century. Texts for the course will be largely original sources from the period, including descriptive histories and travel accounts as well as maps of the Earth and plans of the universe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 004 Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History.

Instructor(s): Thomas A Green (tagreen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar deals with several fundamental issues in Western civilization as they have manifested themselves in the Anglo-American past: the requisites for criminal guilt; the means of determining whether one possesses those requisites (typically, the criminal trial); and the most common justifications for imposition of punishment (retribution, deterrence, and reform). We shall study these matters in relation to two central ideas of freedom: political liberty and human free will. Special attention will be given to: the history of the jury as a "buffer" between the state and the individual or the community; the manner in which challenges to the presumption that humans possess the ability freely to control their behavior have shaped the institutions and ideas of Anglo-American criminal justice. Students will analyze and discuss primary sources and recent historical writings and will write several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Science & Imagination in the 19th Century.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The nineteenth-century saw the rise of a number of new "sciences" claiming to reveal the truths and secrets of things and powers far and near, visible and invisible. Many educated Europeans devoted their lives to the pursuit of knowledge of not only wondrous ancient worlds and exotic places; they were also discovering or inventing new ways to explain the reality that surrounded them. Today, some of those "discoveries" are accepted as cogent and scientific (e.g., Faraday on electricity, Pasteur on microbes), some are regarded as mistaken ideas or downright frauds (mesmerism, galvanism, spiritualism, phrenology), and still others remain highly controversial (theories of race, Marx on labor and value, Freud on dreams and sexuality).

In this course, we will read some novels and "scientific" treatises dating from the period between the late 18th century and the early 20th century. We hope to understand something of the excitement, hope, fear, and anxiety that the possibility of such new knowledge presented to the people of the time. We will pay particular attention to their views and speculations on those phenomena supposedly caused, influenced, or ruled and regulated by some invisible material entities, including electricity, psychical forces, wealth, and value.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Vienna, Berlin, Paris 1890-1930.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When, where, and how does our age begin? Before Vienna the unconscious was an object of wonder; before Berlin the cinema was a charming toy; before Paris music and art made sense. Within the orbits of these great cities, before, during, and after World War I, our world was created at the hands of extraordinary men and women.

This seminar explores the literature, art, music, cinema, the culture of an age in a flurry of creation and destruction, using the similarities and differences of the cities as center. Students will work on projects of their own choosing: some examples from the past have included the self-portraits of Picasso, the war in the air, Hollywood as an outpost of Europe, women's work in wartime, sports photography as a social indicator, there are many possibilities.

Required Readings:

  • Bertold Brecht, Three Penny Opera
  • Albert Einstein, Autiobiography
  • Siegmund Freud, Dora
  • Otto Griedrich, Before the Deluge
  • Frank Whitford, Klimt.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 201. Rome.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor.

Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 211 / MEMS 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

Europe History from European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 218. The Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Other History Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the origins of colonialism and the rise of the Cold War to understand the political, economic, and military conflicts that contributed to the outbreak of war in Vietnam after 1945. While a main focus of this course will be on the involvement of the United States in the war, the course also will portray a broader international perspective of this conflict. With several decades of massive economic, political, and military turmoil, it must be recognized that the Vietnam War brought an overwhelming amount of human tragedy and displacement. Accordingly, this course will attempt to both understand the policy decisions that led to war in Vietnam and, importantly, put a human face on the war both for those from Vietnam (and surrounding nations) and those from the United States.

Along with informed participation in discussion section, all graded work required in this course will consist of written compositions, including two exams and a short paper.

Required readings for the course may be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State:

  • George D. Moss, Vietnam: An American Ordeal, 3d ed. (Prentice Hall, 1994)
  • William J. Duiker, Ho Chi Minh: A Biography (Hyperion, 2000)
  • A collection of primary documents; and
  • several novels/memoirs that examine the human experiences of war.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 247(448) / CAAS 247. Modern Africa.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/247/001.nsf

This is a survey course, an introduction to the history of Africa from around 1850 to the present. The course is organized around lectures, readings (including two novels), discussions, and films. The goals of the course include providing students with an understanding of key developments in African history from the beginnings of the age of imperialism and colonialism through the post-independence struggles for economic security and human rights.

Across the past century and a half, virtually every neighborhood or village, town, and city in Africa experienced "close-up and personal" that is, within their own lives the extraordinary pressures and crises arising from the unfolding of industrialization, new forms of capitalism, new disease vectors, dislocations in transport, labor, and food resources, environmental change, and the rise of governing institutions largely failing to enlist consent. But African struggles for rights, for personal and economic security, for significant cultural values, and diverse social goods have constituted some of the most significant and remarkable developments in the world, witnessed in the arts, in the organization of diasporic and global communities, and in the "sciences" of popular opposition and liberation. This course addresses these contending visions of Africa's past, present, and future.

Expectations: participation in class and section discussions (20%), midterm short essay exam (30%), final short essay exam (50%).

READINGS:

  • Cohen, David William, and E. S. Atieno Odhiambo, Burying SM: The Politics of Knowledge and the Sociology of Power in Africa (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1992).
  • Cooper, Fred, Africa Since 1940: The Past of the Present (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002).
  • Hochschild, Adam, King Leopold's Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1999).
  • Mpe, Phaswane, Welcome to Our Hillbrow (Pietermartizberg, SA: University of Natal Press, 2001).
  • Quinn, Charlotte, and Fred Quinn, Pride, Faith and Fear: Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003 forthcoming).
  • Sembene, Ousmane, God's Bits of Wood: A Novel of the Independence Struggle in French Africa (London: Heinemann, 1986 edition).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 255. Gandhi's India.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nita Kumar

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 151 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course that explores Modern India and M.K. Gandhi through the lens of several different analytical perspectives. Whether we use modernist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, or cultural discursive methodology decides what questions we will ask and what answers we might hope to find or be satisfied with. It will also decide our terminology and our sources, that is, our basic assumptions and the limits we are setting to our knowledge. In this course, therefore, we will study Gandhi: his biography,ideas, practices, successes and failures. We will also use Gandhi as a tool for the doing of History. We will read a dozen books and major articles each with a different interpretive approach, and the reviews of these. Then we will work with some fiction on Gandhi, his own writings, and contemporaries' writitngs, towards a critical paper on "the methodologies of writing on Gandhi." This critical work will, hopefully, include the further question: Is "Gandhi" or "Modern India" a particularly elusive topic? Does the topic require an approach that might perhaps have to be forged, beyond the existing approaches as we can identify them?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 260 / AMCULT 260. Religion in America.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 160 and 161 are recommended but not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a one-term introduction to the study of American religion from colonial times to the present. The emphasis will be on religion as a cultural system rather than as a set of formal beliefs or institutions. We will explore

  • the European roots of American religious forms;
  • the rise of revivalism as a major cultural force in colonial and nineteenth-century America;
  • the commercialization and fragmentation of religious life after the American Revolution;
  • the place of women in the major religious traditions;
  • the synthesis of African, Native, and Christian belief systems and the rise of the Black church as a political force;
  • the emergence of fundamentalism on the political stage in the twentieth-century; and
  • the wide diversity of sectarian beliefs in all eras of American history.

Students will read a variety of texts, and write several short papers as well as a longer, research-based paper. A midterm and final exam are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 277 / HJCS 277 / ACABS 277 / AAPTIS 277 / JUDAIC 277 / RELIGION 277. The Land of Israel/Palestine through the Ages.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yaron Z Eliav

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies 277.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001 [3 Credits]. Meets with History 284.002.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as:

  • the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health; the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making;
  • the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers;
  • the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure";
  • the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and the changing organization and power of the healing professions.

We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course.

Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. Required Readings:

  • Leavitt and Numbers, Sickness and Health in America
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years
  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange
  • DeKruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Pernick, The Black Stork
  • Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science
  • Courspack from Dollar Bill
  • (Warner and Tighe, Major Problems in History of American Medicine under consideration, not yet decided to be announced later.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-3, Required purchases cost $15, but additional required reading assignments, available on reserve or for optional purchase, cost up to $110 additional if bought. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 002 [4 Credits]. Meets with History 284.001.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as:

  • the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health; the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making;
  • the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers;
  • the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure";
  • the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and the changing organization and power of the healing professions.

We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course.

Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. Required Readings:

  • Leavitt and Numbers, Sickness and Health in America
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years
  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange
  • DeKruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Pernick, The Black Stork
  • Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science
  • Courspack from Dollar Bill
  • (Warner and Tighe, Major Problems in History of American Medicine under consideration, not yet decided to be announced later.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-3, Required purchases cost $15, but additional required reading assignments, available on reserve or for optional purchase, cost up to $110 additional if bought. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 286 / RELIGION 286. A History of Eastern Christianity from the 4th to the 18th Century.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces Eastern Christianity from the 4th through the 18th century. A broad survey course aimed at undergraduates of all concentrations, there are no prerequisites; the course focuses on both Church history and theology. It begins with Constantine's conversion and traces the growth of the Church, the rise of monasticism, the creation of the creed (the Councils of Nicea and Chalcedon), and the secession of the Eastern churches (Coptic and Syriac), the role of religious pictures and the iconoclast dispute and relations with the West (Rome) which were frequently strained before the official break in the 11th century. We cover the conversion of the Slavs and the eventual formation of independent Slavic national churches. We treat the fall of the Byzantine and Medieval Slavic states to the Turks and the position of the Orthodox under the Turks. Attention is also given to the Russian Church from the 9th century to the Old Believer schism and Church reforms of Peter the Great. Readings are varied. There is no textbook. A relevant paper of the student's choice, an hour exam, and a final are required.

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HISTORY 287 / ARMENIAN 287. Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual elites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history, the debates on foreign policy choices and their relationship to political elites and the Armenian Diaspora.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 001 Science, Technology, and Defining the Human.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses a fundamental question: why have modern Western societies entrusted scientific and technological practices with the task of setting the boundaries of "humanity"? We will examine two kinds of boundaries: the external ones between humans on one side and animals and machines on the other; and the ones internal to society, such as gender and race. New disciplines such as sociobiology and artificial intelligence have challenged the very notion of human distinctiveness. At the same time, biological knowledge has been instrumental in defining sexual and racial difference. What is at stake in these debates? Why have these debates increasingly spoken the language of science rather than religion or art? In order to answer these questions, we will examine a broad range of issues, from animal rights to cloning, and from the political consequences of genetic screening to the search for the "gay gene."

Method of instruction - This course will be taught as a seminar. Students' active participation will be required.

Requirements: Two short papers (3 pages each), one final paper (10-12 pages), and participation in class discussion.

Readings:

  • Arien Mack (ed.), Humans and Other Animals;
  • Katherine Hayles, How We Became Posthuman;
  • Bruce Mazlish, The Fourth Discontinuity;
  • Stephen Jay Gould, The Mismeasure of Man;
  • Diane Paul, Controlling Human Heredity;
  • Edward Stein, The Mismeasure of Desire;
  • Suzanne Holland (ed.), The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate;
  • Glenn McGee (ed.), The Human Cloning Debate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

Section 002 Race & Nation in Latin America. [Honors]. Meets with Honors 250.005 and ANTHRCUL 258.001

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/258/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 258.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 312 / AMCULT 312. History of Latinos in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTORY 377. (3). (Excl). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/312/001.nsf

See American Culture 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 319. Europe Since 1945.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/319/001.nsf

This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural history of the European continent (East and West, South and North) from the end of WWII to the present. The lectures will be organized both chronologically and thematically. A course like this cannot aim at exhaustiveness, and some important topics in national histories will not be covered. We will focus instead on transnational events and movements that affected the lives of Europeans across the boundaries of the single nation states. As a rule, particular national cases will be discussed mostly as examples of general patterns and processes. We will deal with a wide range of sources (from monographs and scholarly articles to movies, memoirs, and works of fiction) in our attempt to move beyond the level of state policies and capture the meanings of events for the historical actors who lived through them. Topics will include the politics of the Cold War, the Stalinization of Eastern Europe, the process of European integration, the advent of mass consumption, protest movements in capitalist and socialist countries, and the fall of communism after 1989 and its consequences.

Readings:

  • Wegs and Ladrech, Europe Since 1945. A Concise History;
  • Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper;
  • Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism;
  • Angelo Quattrocchi and Tom Nairn, The Beginning of the End: France, May 1968;
  • Peter Maas, Love Thy Neighbor;
  • Katherine Hayter, Open Borders;
  • Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa;
  • Course packet

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 320. Britain, 1901-1939: Culture and Politics.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria through the Second World War, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state; the First World War and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subjects; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist governments in Europe; and the experience of the Blitz and World War II. Students will be asked to think critically about the various means by which national and personal stories are constituted, repressed, re-imagined, and deployed in debates about the meaning and uses of the past. Readings and other course materials will include autobiographies, novels, films, and photographs, and class sessions will include extensive discussion. No previous knowledge of British history will be assumed or required.

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HISTORY 322 / GERMAN 322. The Origins of Nazism.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu) , Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/322/001.nsf

This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the first World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims of the regime. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 333 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / POLSCI 396 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Political Economy of Transformation in Eastern Europe. Meets with Anthropology 317.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rees/396/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 334 / MENAS 334 / AAPTIS 364. Selected Topics in Near and Middle Eastern Studies.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Perspectives on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. March 5-April 16. [ 1 credit]. Meets with Political Science 389.002 and Judaic 317.003. [Drop/Add deadline=March 18].

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 389.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 336 / CAAS 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in America.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle Mittchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 336.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 340 / ANTHRCUL 340. Colonial Histories/Postcolonial Presents.

Section 001 Meets with Comparative Literature 384.002.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 340.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 344 / RCSSCI 344. The History of Detroit in the 20th Century.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu), Ward

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 344.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 345 / RCSSCI 357. History and Theory of Punishment.

U.S. History

Section 001 History & Theory of Punishment.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 357.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 348(477). Latin America: The National Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Meets with History 478.002.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/348/001.nsf

This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes: (1) state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels; (2) elite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and (3) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages. The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

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HISTORY 352(550). Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a systematic analysis of state, society, people, and ideas in Imperial China from 221 B.C. to the end of the 18th century. Each dynasty or period is examined by its characteristic development and unique features. The following topics are to be covered:

  1. the concept and structure of empire;
  2. emperors and political culture;
  3. great thinkers, influential political leaders, and powerful rebels;
  4. wars and foreigners;
  5. Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism;
  6. class, gender, and race;
  7. writers, literature, and the structure of feeling;
  8. science and technology; and
  9. eating culture, art of entertainment, and daily life.

Special features of the course include reading of Classical Chinese poetry, singing of Peking opera, and discussion of the Scientific Revolution and the birth of "Modern China" in the 17th century. The course is open to all undergraduates.

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HISTORY 355 / CAAS 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider health and illness, medicine, and disease in diverse African worlds from the fifteenth century to the present. Designed equally for concentrators in History and Afroamerican and African Studies and students planning careers in the health professions in this country and abroad. No prior knowledge of Africa is assumed. Though historical in nature, the course will draw on the methodologies of medical anthropology, epidemiology, and medical sociology. It will propose health and wealth as a central theme to the history of Africans in diverse social and historical contexts, both on the African continent and in the larger Black Atlantic world. The central question will be: what happened to these deeply rooted forms of moral logic and therapeutic practice as Africans encountered new forms of wealth, inequality, and disease and new medical and healing systems associated with slave trades, colonialisms, epidemics, famines, debt and theft from the fifteenth century to the present?

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HISTORY 357(392). Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Rise & Fall of Apartheid State. Meets with History 595.001

Instructor(s): Keith Breckenridge

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/595/001.nsf

The white supremacist state that emerged in South Africa in the 20th century was the last and the most systematically racist society on the Atlantic Basin. The history of this society is deeply interesting, partly because of the intensity of the conflicts that have shaped it for three centuries and partly because the astonishing effort to defeat racism and violence has finally succeeded. This lecture and discussion course will survey the political and economic history of South Africa from the mid-19th century to the present. We will examine the history of imperialism, the particular form of capitalist development, the relationship between South Africa and the USA, the origins and character of Apartheid, and the global effort to bring about its defeat. The course will also focus throughout on developments in South Africa today. This history reflects economic and cultural processes at work in all the societies of the Atlantic Basin, and students will be encouraged to make these comparisons wherever possible. While the sequence of problems shaping the course are all taken from political and economic history, students will be encouraged to explore problems of their own in the design of a final research paper.

Readings:

  • Nelson Mandela. Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela.
  • Dan O'Meara. Forty Lost Years.
  • Deborah Posel. The Making of Apartheid, 1948-1961.
  • Mamphela Ramphele and Francis Wilson. Uprooting Poverty: The South African Challenge.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 357(392). Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Law & Society in Colonial World. Meets with History 595.002.

Instructor(s): Catherine Burns

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/357/002.nsf

The great themes of the course are these: The emergence and significance of private landed property and the social relationships intertwined with the processes of land dispossession and privatization in England; concomitant ideas about human liberty and the rule of law; the use of state violence and capital punishment; the codification of wage labour relationships; the cementing of gender and racial distinctions into law; the transportation of convicts; the enslavement of human beings; the indenturing of contracted labour; the seizure of people and their labour, of land and natural resources through colonial conquest; and the many contradictions and dynamics of these in their inter-relation with the laws and societies of the dispossessed and the conquered. Many of these themes are tackled in courses on Law and Society in the Americas or Europe. In this course the complex intertwining of social change and the making and practice of law over the last 300 years will be tackled from the point of view of Africans, and South Africans in particular.

This course is based on a series of five debates, taking up key areas of law and its movement through space and time in the period of European colonization of North America, Asia and Africa. The course culminates in a detailed study of law and society in South Africa. Starting on territory familiar to many students of USA history, Western philosophy and Western legal systems, the course charts the movement of ideas and practices concerning private property and ownership (including ownership of people) outwards from 18th-century Europe to Australia, North America, India and finally to the West and then the Southern coasts of Africa.

  1. The first debate centers around crime and punishment in the late 1700s and early 1800s in England where crimes against capital were considered so egregious that capital punishment was meted out for forgery and yet this was also an age in which utilitarianism took root and Bethamite systems of rehabilitation were implemented. Students will raise issues here that carry across the Atlantic and Indian oceans: what were the constraints upon a radical interpretation of the ideas and practices of the Enlightenment in the context of England itself, let alone the societies colonized by it in the succeeding centuries?
  2. The second debate centers on the violent settlement of Australia by ships filled with transported and convicted felons banished from English metropolitan centers in the midst of a perceived crime epidemic. What ideas of ideas of reform and of the rights of people were rooted in these acts and practices?
  3. The third debate introduces the complex issue of local and indigenous versus English law: as "customary law" became codified alongside English law in colonies as diverse as India and Natal, what were the consequences for law and society in these regions? The contested history of widow immolation in India forms the case study that forms the basis of the Indian debate that draws these threads together.
  4. In the fourth debate we move to Africa and contemplate the impact of English legal ideas and practices percolated through the beans of the American, Australian, and Indian experiences in the English conquest of West and then East and Southern Africa. What were the roots of policies of indirect rule and segregation? Can they be traced back to the English social and economic transformations of the middle 1700s? How did they shift, reform, give way in the face of local contexts and responses?
  5. Finally, the course culminates with a detailed examination of law and society in 19th- and 20th-century South Africa: again violence, freedom, land dispossession, labour relationships, racially codified laws; gender distinction; the legal framing of private property; and debates about freedom and the rule of law frame the readings.

We conclude the course with a course-wide debate on a topic from the final theme, chosen by students in collaboration with the instructor for its roots in the past, but with a burning relevance to contemporary debates around law and society in a post colonial society, such as post-1994 South Africa.

Students write two short papers, prepare two small group debates and one large class-wide debate and write one longer paper on a theme arising from the course which they develop in collaboration with the instructor.

Representative readings include extracts from the works of: Hay, Linebaugh, Foucault, Lani, Chatterjee, Spivak, Mamdani, Chanock, Cooper, Prakash, Hughes, Stoler, Northrup, Beinart, and Davenport.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 359. Visions of the Past.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathon Marwil (jmarvil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course rests on the proposition that most of what most people have ever known about the past has come from deliberated aesthetic forms such as monuments, paintings, novels, and films. Many more Americans have read or seen Gone With the Wind than have ever read a history of the Civil War; films like Schindler's List have been the primary means by which Americans and Europeans have conceptualized the destruction of European Jewry. This course, therefore, will examine how and why history is represented in the various aesthetic forms, and how those representations have created our sense of what is important in history. We shall read a half dozen novels and plays, see several films, look at a variety of art and architecture, and listen to several musical forms. Classes will be lecture and discussion, and there will be one or two papers besides a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 367 / AMCULT 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): GREGORY E DOWD (dowdg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/367/001.nsf

See American Culture 367.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 371 / WOMENSTD 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/371/002.nsf

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 372 / WOMENSTD 372. Women and Gender in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/372/001.nsf

This course explores the history of women and gender relations in European society and culture during the early modern period: from the Protestant Reformation and the opening out to the New World through the French Revolution. Through lectures, discussions, and readings, we will pursue the following questions:

  • How did the gender systems of early modern societies shape women's lives?
  • What was the range of possibilities open to early modern women and how did they respond to them?
  • How important was gender to the ways in which early modern women thought and wrote about their lives and about the issues of the day?
  • How did gender intersect with other factors, such as class or status, religious or national identity, age, sexuality, or marital status, and the particular circumstances of times, place, and culture in shaping individual women's lives?

The major writing assignment for this course will be a substantial research paper that takes the form of a narrative of the life of an imaginary woman who lived between 1500 and 1800. Each student will take as a starting point a specific occupation in which women engaged during the period. Papers will then describe the life of a woman engaged in that occupation in a specific historical and cultural settting, with special attention to issues of gender as they intersect with other categories of identity. To complete the assignment, students will need to do wide-ranging research in secondary sources and, when available, primary ones.

The textbook for the course will be:

  • Wiesner, Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 2nd edition.
  • Additional readings will include texts and documents written by women during the period we are studying, such as:

    • Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies,
    • The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila, The Memoirs of Gluckel of Hameln
    • Graffigny, Letters of a Peruvian Woman, The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave
    • Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.
  • Additional readings by contemporary historians of women and gender will supplement both textbook and primary sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 374 / AMCULT 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/374/001.nsf

See American Culture 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 378 / AMCULT 314. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente M Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 382 / MEMS 382. History of the Jews from the Spanish Expulsion to the Eve of Enlightenment.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nina Caputo (caputon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey major trends in Jewish society from the break-up of the medieval world to the emergence of a new order in 18th-century Europe. Within Jewish society, the unifying theme will be the emergence and spread of Lurianic kabbalah, culminating in the Sabbatian movement and the rise of Hassidism in Poland.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 384. Modern Jewish History 1880-1948.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mitchell Hart (mbhart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the history of the Jewish people in Europe, America, and the Middle East over the last one hundred years. The course begins with an overview of the first half of the 19th century and the emancipation and integration of Jews into European countries. It then discusses the rise of virulent forms of anti-Semitism at the end of the nineteenth century and examines how this undermined Jewish assimilation in Western Europe and dashed all hope for emancipation in Eastern Europe. The course then considers the various ways in which Jews responded to this new crisis: nationalism, revolutionary socialism, emigration, assimilationist defense activities, and conversion. We then turn to the events of the twentieth century, events that totally changed the face of world Jewry: the Bolshevik revolution, the Holocaust, the creation of the State of Israel, and the emergence of the American Jewish community as the largest and most secure community in the history of the diaspora.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 France and Its Empire. Meets with History 591.001.

Instructor(s): Maya Jasanoff (jasanoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From 1800 to the 1960s, France ruled an empire encompassing, at its peak, 100 million people and over 10 million square kilomters, from Algiers to Timbuktu to Tahiti, and Martinique to Madagascar. How did French colonial rule transform the societies it encountered? And how did the possession of the vast and varied empire affect France itself? This seminar will look at the relationship of France and its colonies across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from "First Empire" formed by Napoleon in and beyond Europe, through the apogee of French imperial power during the Third Republic (1871-1940), up to the colonial independence movements of the mid-twentieth century and post-colonial predicaments of France today. With readings such as C.L.R. James, The Black Jacobins, Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, and films such as "the Battle of Algiers" and La Haine, we will endeavor to understand the aspirations and anxieties of "greater France," and think about problems of race, identity, cross-cultural encounter, and power. Students will be able to develop a long paper (10-12pp.) on a theme and region of their choice. All readings are in English. Knowledge of French is NOT required, and no prior knowledge of French history is expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Chinese Women's Lives: From the Personal to the Political. Meets with Women's Studies 342.002.

Instructor(s): Zheng Wang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 342.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. A maximum of six credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Associate Chairman.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Race, Gender, and Empire in the Nuclear Age. Meets with RCSSI 374.001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Medicine and Health in U.S. Culture Since 1875.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Unprecedented technical advances and dramatic cultural changes transformed the health of Americans and the healing professions since 1875. This course examines how gender, race, ethnicity, economics, politics, and changing cultural meanings of disease and science combined with scientific innovations to alter medicine, health, and society. Class is discussion format, with occasional short lectures. Students are expected to read and discuss thoughtfully about 150 pages per week, drawn from often-divergent sources. A 15-page paper based on original historical research, a weekly journal, and two 5-page book review papers are required. Required purchases cost about $35 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $175. Overrides for non-history concentrators will be allocated the first day. Anyone absent from the first class without advance permission may not take the course.

Required Readings:

  • Starr, Social Transformation of American Medicine
  • DeKruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Tomes, Gospel of Germs
  • Brandt, No Magic Bullet
  • Pernick, The Black Stork
  • Coursepack from Dollar Bill
  • (additional title under consideration to be announced later)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-5. Required purchases cost about $25 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $125. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 Fictional Narratives: 20th-Century British History in Novels.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

History has been a notable presence in contemporary British novels, from Pat Barker's World War I trilogy to Zadie Smith's White Teeth and beyond. These novels are not "historical fiction" in the sense of romance novels set in some bygone age, but they are also not simply set in the author's "own" time or "the present", and they often cover a sweep of time rather than being centered on a single moment of the past. At their best, such novels have been serious contributions to historical writing more generally, imaginatively exploring both the complexity of the past and the ways it may haunt the present. This course will use contemporary British novels to think about how 20th-century British history has been represented through fiction. The goal is not to judge fiction against real'' history but to consider both how fiction may illuminate the past and how the historical location of fiction matters that is, not just what a novel can tell us about the past but what posts a novel itself is situated in. Students will learn a good deal of British history in this course, but the broader goal is to think about forms of historical writing, especially as contemporary writers represent recent times in history.

  • What kinds of history get represented, and how do authors show relations between different histories?
  • What are the risks of fiction as a mode of exploring history?
  • What kinds of historical forces does fiction have a hard time with?
  • What does it do especially well?
  • Does fiction always "domesticate" history, making it a story of individuals and emotions?
  • What techniques of writing have authors explored to capture the, difference, the strangeness of the past?

Readings may include novels such as:

  • Pat Barker's World War I trilogy and Zadie Smith's White Teeth,
  • Graham Swift's Waterland and/or Last Orders,
  • Jonathan Coe's The Rotter's Club (on "the 70s"),
  • Ian McEwan's Atonement (on the 30s and WWII),
  • Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day,
  • Colm Toibin's The Blackwater Lightship (on Ireland),
  • Andrew O'Hagan's Our Fathers (on Scotland), among many possibilities.

Students will write short response papers to some of these shared works and will also write a long paper on works they choose, from a list of possibilities that includes books on all the themes noted as well as others. We will also consider film versions of some of these fictions, and watch at least parts of several films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 006 Confucian and Chinese History.

Instructor(s): Chun-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. Meets with American Culture 496.003.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the collective efforts of African-Americans to overcome racial discrimination and legal segregation over the course of the 20th century. How were Black protest movements organized? Why did they succeed or fail to achieve their goals? What caused them to disintegrate? Specifically, we will compare the role that ideological, strategic, and contextual factors played in the success or failure of movements. We will also examine how Black social movements have made use of and generated African-American cultural practice. Finally, we will discuss how relations of race, class, and gender both within American society and within the African-American community were reflected in these movements.

The course will be conducted as a discussion seminar. Students will also be expected to keep a journal of responses to the course reading and will write research paper based on primary documents.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Jew, Europe, and the American Culture.

Instructor(s): Mitch Hart (mbhart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the 19th and 20th centuries, millions of Jews migrated from Europe to the United States. A vast amount of scholarship exists on the process whereby these Jews became Americans, how they assimilated or acculturated info American society. The emphasis in much of this work has been on the break, the discontinuity between Europe and America. This course explores the continuities, the ways in which "Europe" was carried over to the United States, and then made its way into American culture through the mediation of Jewish immigrants. The course will explore both high and popular culture, from Albert Einstein, Hannah Arendt, the New School for Social Research, to the role of Jews in Hollywood. And it will pay particular attention to the politics of culture, including the ways in which European anti-Semitism and the Holocaust were translated into a particular American idiom, and functioned socially and politically in this new context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Nationalities & Empire in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Elena I Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The colloquium will focus on the issues of nationality and empire in Imperial Russian and Soviet history.

How were the Imperial and Soviet multiethnic states held together, and what were the tensions that led to their disintegration? How were the concepts of ethnicity and nationality articulated and manifested in politics? What were the Imperial and Soviet approaches to nationality and nation?

We shall explore these questions through examining the issues of identities, nationality policies and ideologies. Particular attention will be given to the development of the nationalistic discourse in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.

The readings include primary sources translated into English, as well as theoretical and historical writings.

Course requirements:

  • Class participation (50%): attendance, participation (this includes participation in discussions and oral presentations).
  • Research paper (50%): 20-25 pages (with foot notes or end-notes), prospectus and bibliography for paper due March 27; paper due April 21.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 History of the Human Sciences.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/397/004.nsf

This undergraduate seminar will explore some of the ways in which knowledge about human beings and their behavior has been made from the late eighteenth century to the present. Looking across a range of academic disciplines including anthropology, sociology, psychology, psychiatry, and economics we will focus particularly on how human beings, considered individually or collectively, have become objects of scientific investigation. We will also query the social and political implications of this move. Starting with various attempts to understand the human sciences theoretically, we will address such topics as the construction of the notion of normality, the making and re-making of hysteria as a mental pathology, the development of the sciences of race and gender, the human being as an experimental object, and state power and human individuality. We will be concerned throughout with understanding the cultural embeddedness and political ramifications of the various ways in which human beings have been constituted within the human sciences. This seminar counts as an elective toward the academic minor in Science, Technology & Society (http://www.umich.edu/~umsts).

Required texts:

  • Degler, Carl, In Search of Human Nature: The Decline and Revival of Darwinism in American Social Thought, ISBN: 0195077075
  • Foucault, Michel, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, ISBN: 0679752552
  • Smith, Roger The Norton History of the Human Sciences, ISBN: 0393317331
  • Herman, Ellen, The Romance of American Psychology: Political Culture in the Age of Experts, ISBN:0520207033
  • Gould, Stephen Jay, Mismeasure of Man, ISBN: 0393314251
  • Mead, Margaret, Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilization, ISBN: 0688050336

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 005 Greek Religion: Cult, Comp, Gender.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz (gschmalz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We shall understand Greek religion as a traditional language, narrated in myth and performed in rituals, in which from prehistory to the cities of the fourth century Greeks understood their world and negotiated the realities, fears, and hopes of their lives and communities. The course will not offer a survey but, in comparative approaches, explore basic human concepts as they appear in selected topics (such as progressive and cyclic time, transcendence of sacred time and space in ritual performance, cosmogony, death and rebirth, chaos and renewal of social order, sacrifices, civic religion, the ecstatic body and mind, initiations) and a few paradigmatic gods, including Dionysos, the god of boundless contradictions. We shall confront the otherness of Greek culture as well as common humane experiences still relevant for the understanding of ourselves and modern societies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Instructor(s): Damon Salesa (salesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students; junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/398/001.nsf

This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-term sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students, HISTORY 398, and senior standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HISTORY 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 401. Problems in Greek History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 SagesTyrants&CommArchaicGreece.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Chaucer Schmalz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 412 / MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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HISTORY 427. Magic, Religion, and Science in Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the "first three minutes" of the modern mental universe in actuality, about three centuries of historical time (1500-1800). It concentrates on how the "big bang" of the Protestant Reformation blasted apart a world view and a culture that had slowly developed over a thousand years. The explosive force of that strangely contingent event, renewed by subsequent eruptions of religious conflict and civil war, divided the English people culturally as never before. Magic declined, miracles and malevolent witches disappeared, the prestige of the ancient sciences of astrology and alchemy eroded. New and powerful philosophical ideas about human understanding and physical reality flourished; scientific explanations for a vast array of celestial, earthly, and mental phenomena proliferated and were embraced by laypersons as the basis of a new faith, the faith in (someone else's) reason. The world view that dominates modern English (and Western) culture emerged from almost three hundred years of charged conflict and began rapidly to evolve into contemporary scientism. And yet the shattering effect of the events that powered cultural change also made it impossible for secularization and rational religion fully to triumph. The hold of rational religion and secularism on the minds of the majority of ordinary men and women remained less complete than on the minds of the educated, governing classes. The result finally was a cultural and social realignment. The elite fashioned a "superculture" that is dominated by religious rationalism and scientistic faith; the dissenting sects, the lower classes and marginalized groups have sustained and created subcultures that are characterized by supernatural wonder and sudden infusions of spiritual and emotional energy. Much has changed since 1800 when this process was more or less completed, but these cultural and class divisions have not disappeared, and they have complicated ethnic relations as well as politics. In sum, this course is finally a meditation on how England lost its medieval mind and found its modern, divided sensibility. Principal readings will include all or part of Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars; Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic; James Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England, 1550-1800; Peter French, John Dee: The Life of a Renaissance Magus; and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution. A course pack of articles and original sources will also be required. Students will be asked to write three short (five page) papers on the readings for class; an in-class, midterm examination and a two-hour final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam; a one-hour written exam; writing on one essay question out of about four; one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor); and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions).

Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin; Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs; the development of Bulgaria after 1878; the Macedonia problem; terrorist societies; World War I; the formation of Yugoslavia; nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars; German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans; World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War); Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR, and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism; Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Meets with History 434.005.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

HISTORY 434 explores the history of revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union. At the present moment of historical reimagining, when the Soviet past is rapidly being reconstructed to suit various contemporary needs, studying in a careful way the history of what until recently was the world's second great "super power" should provide new perspectives for students interested in the complexities of the present day world. Using novels, memoirs, documents, and other texts, HISTORY 434 will explore the utopian visions as well as the harsh social realities of the developing Soviet system, its culture, politics, economics, and imperial structures as well as the broad historical patterns underlying its collapse. While focusing on the Soviet Union, it will also attempt to link these patterns with the human predicament more generally.

The course is designed for juniors, seniors, and first year graduate students, but should be accessible to sophomores as well. It presumes no prior knowledge or Russian or European history. Undergraduates are required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, complete in a timely way all required reading, prepare two short written projects, and take a midterm and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers:

  1. the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere;
  2. Japan's coerced entry into the world market;
  3. the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia;
  4. the rise of social protest and mass culture;
  5. political reaction and militarism;
  6. defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation;
  7. postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony;
  8. myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society."

Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion, and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings; discussion panels; in-class midterm; final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA II: 1942-2000.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 464 / AMCULT 464. Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 464.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1945.

U.S. History

Section 001 Undergraduates only. Meets with History 467.011.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topical and thematic approach to postwar United States history, including Cold War politics and culture, the rise and fall of New Deal liberalism, the power shift to the suburbs and Sunbelt, social movements of the Left and the Right, the triumph of marketing and consumer culture, and the era of globalization and its discontents. The course is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include books, films, documentaries, fiction, and short research projects. We will engage questions such as:

  • What happened to the power base of organized labor?
  • How did the Cold War reshape postwar America?
  • How have civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Christian Right, and other grassroots movements/interest group politics changed American society?
  • Why is the "war" metaphor so popular in American domestic policy?
  • Were the Seventies more important than the Sixties?
  • How did the ideology of American Exceptionalism overcome the "Vietnam Syndrome"?
  • Where did your shoes actually come from?
  • How are Latinos and other new immigrant groups changing contemporary politics?
  • Are the "culture wars" finally over?
  • What global arrangements have replaced the Cold War framework?
  • Did the 1990s really mark the triumph of the "new economy"?

Students who took HISTORY 374/AMCULT 374 in Fall Academic Term 2000 should contact the instructor before enrolling in the course.

Probable texts, subject to change, include:

  • Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
  • William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
  • Tom Engelhardt, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation
  • Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
  • Bruce Schulman, The Seventies
  • Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
  • Mike Davis, Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City
  • Thomas Frank, One Market Under God

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Women in Imperial China.

Instructor(s): Mark C Elliott

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/472/001.nsf

Prerequisite: Upper-division or graduate standing. Recent years have seen a revolution in the study of women in imperial China, especially the period from the Song (960-1279) to the Qing (1644-1912) dynasties. This course introduces students to the field of Chinese women's history during this era through extensive readings in the fast-growing secondary literature as well as in selected primary sources (the latter in translation). We will examine such issues as piety, politics, education, literature, marriage, reproduction, sexuality, and work. This seminar is open to advanced undergraduates and to graduate students, with differing requirements.

Enrollment is limited to 15. Preference will be given to students with some previous coursework in Chinese studies and/or women's studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 History of Hinduism. Meets with ASIAN 455.002.

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/002.nsf

See Asian Studies 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 003 Sacred Text & History in India. Meets with ASIAN 455.002.

Instructor(s): Donald Davis Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/455/003.nsf

See Asian Studies 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the evolution of American constitutional law from 1789 to the present. It will rely primarily upon reading the selections from the opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court to be found in A.T. Mason and D.G. Stephenson, Jr., eds., American Constitutional Law, and Stanley Kutler, ed., The Supreme Court And The Constitution. The goal will be to discover how the different material circumstances and social and political assumptions of each age in American history have been reflected in the Supreme Court's shifting conceptions of the meaning of the Constitution. In this way, we will seek to define how beliefs about the essential character of American republicanism have been altered through time, and in addition, to appreciate the Supreme Court's changing understanding of its own role in the constitutional order. There are no prerequisites for the course, but HISTORY 160-161 or an equivalent understanding of the general structure of American history is assumed. There will be a midterm examination of ninety minutes, a ten-page term paper, and a two-hour final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Lewis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/lhc/412/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 001 Race and Citizenship in Comparative Historical Perspective: The United States and Cuba, 1865-1965. Meets with Law 877. 001

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/history/477/001.nsf

This joint LSA/Law School seminar explores the relationship of law and society during a process of radical political and social transformation: the end of slavery and the redefining of the boundaries of race and citizenship. In the United States, male former slaves became full political participants for the brief period of Reconstruction, but massive retrenchment followed and by the early 20th century, African Americans had been virtually eliminated from Southern electoral politics. In Cuba, by contrast, shortly after slavery was abolished a large-scale cross-racial nationalist movement emerged whose legacy was a strong claim to citizenship by Afro-Cuban veterans, a claim that led to the incorporation of a guarantee of universal manhood suffrage in the Cuban Constitution of 1901. Thus at the same moment that black disfranchisement in much of the South was allowed to stand by the U. S. Supreme Court, cross-racial enfranchisement was written into the Cuban Constitution. The subsequent histories of voting and political participation in both societies were framed within this contrast, through the period of the Cuban revolution of 1959 and the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965.

In exploring these contrasting histories, we will read key legal cases, historical testimony, and secondary accounts, paying attention to the interplay of law, electoral politics, and other forms of collective action.

Professor Scott is the Frederick Huetwell Professor of History, and Professor of Law. Author of the book Slave Emancipation in Cuba, she is a specialist on the study of societies after slavery in the United States and Latin America.

All enrolled students will participate in the 2-hr seminar, Mondays 7-9 pm. LSA students will also participate in an extra one-hour discussion section, W 3-4, and will receive 3 credits for the course.

Copies of the draft syllabus will be available at Prof. Scott's office, 969 Legal Research.

Admission is by permission of the instructor only; open to law students, advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Please send your request, accompanied by a detailed (2 paragraph) statement of interest and background, to Prof. Rebecca Scott at rjscott@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Admission is by permission of the instructor, via email to rjscott@umich.edu.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 002 Critical Race Theory: American Legal Culture & Construction. Meets with CAAS 495.002.

Instructor(s): Martha Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/caas/495/002.nsf

See CAAS 495.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

Section 003 American Legal Hist Workshop. Meets with Law 851.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas A Green (tagreen@umich.edu), Susanna Blumenthal

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the role of ethnicity in the rise of conflicts in the Caucasus during the last century. It will examine militarized conflicts (such as in Nagorno Karabagh, Abkhazia, and Chechnya) as well as latent ones (such as Javakheti, Ajaria, and Daghestan). The evolution of ethnicity and nationalism will be studied in conjunction with the role of religion, class, Russian and Soviet nationalities policies, and more recently, of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijjan, and Georgia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 487 / ENGLISH 416 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/english/416/001.nsf

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 495. Medieval Inner Asia.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of Inner Asian history and its connections with the wider world. Inner Asian affairs have impinged and imposed upon the histories of the Near East, East Asia, and Russia. Besides the present importance of this vast area, the past importance of nomads in the history of Eurasia justifies a course focusing on the history of nomadism from the nomad's point of view. Among the topics to be covered are: the rise of nomadism and the nature of nomadic politics; the great nomadic enterprises: Scythians, Hsuing-Nu, Huns, Turks, and Mongols; the conflict of religions in Inner Asia; the spread of Tibetan Buddhism and the decline of nomadism; the expansion of the Russian and Ching empires; the "Great Game" and the erection of buffer states in Asia; the communist impact on Inner Asia; the problems and promise of independence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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