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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 11:43 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present.

Instructor(s): Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed HISTART 104 and 105, or 150. Two credits granted to those who have completed one of HISTART 104 or 105. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A chronological survey of major achievements in Western painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th C. to the mid-20th C., this course proposes both to reveal the uniqueness of great creative personalities (how, through the manipulation of their art forms, they gave expression to profound feelings) and to place these masters within their sociocultural contexts (with their shifting conceptions of human relationships to the physical and spiritual worlds). Along the way, a variety of art-historical methodologies will be pressed into action. What we will study gives visual form to human thought and aspirations of seven centuries, and in challenging, stirring, and teaching will reveal to us hitherto hidden truths. Except for commitment a willingness to become intellectually and emotionally involved there is no prerequisite. Course materials include a textbook, a set of study prints, an on-line Image Study Gallery, and a syllabus. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations, informed participation in discussion sections, and a short museum paper.

Required text: Frederick Hartt, Art: A History of Painting Sculpture Architecture, Vol. II, Prentice-Hall/Abrams Paperback, latest edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 103. Arts of Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take a topical approach to the arts of Asia rather than attempt a broad survey. One segment will trace the transmission of Buddhist arts (particularly architecture, painting, and sculpture) across northern Asia from the tradition's origins in India across China and into Japan. The Ming/Qing capital of Beijing and the Tokugawa capital of Edo (modern Tokyo) will be analyzed as symbols of political power. The course will also examine the social values inscribed in secular painting and graphic arts such as Chinese landscape painting, Indian miniatures, and Japanese wood block prints. Course work will include two short essays, a midterm, and a final examination. No prerequisites. First- and second-year students especially welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 108 / CAAS 108. Introduction to African Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jessica Levin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the art and architecture of sub-Saharan Africa by focusing on major styles and movements from the 11th century to the present. Students will critically evaluate the notion of a canon as well as the categories of traditional, contemporary, and popular art. A range of works will be considered, including sculpture, masquerade, royal regalia, body arts, photography, installation, and movie posters. Lectures will locate African visual culture within its social, religious, and political contexts. Weekly discussion sections will explore in depth such thematic concerns as patronage, authorship, portraiture, gender, authenticity, performance, and museum display. Course work includes section participation, two short papers, midterm and a final examination. No prior knowledge of African art is necessary.

Required text: Monica Blackmun Visona, ed. A History of Art in Africa; Suzanne Preston Blier, The Royal Arts of Africa: The Majesty of Form; course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 Collecting African Art: From Pillage to Preservation.

Instructor(s): Jessica Levin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This first-year seminar considers African artworks stolen, seized in time of war, traded through illicit networks, or otherwise illegally gained. Students will debate the merits of returning these objects to previous owners, community-based institutions, and national museums. The question of repatriation will be addressed using case studies from Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Ethiopia, and Burkina Faso, among other countries. For each case study, the class will investigate the artworks' local meanings, circulation in international trade networks, and role in national agendas. Topics include: the question of universal vs. individual ownership of great masterpieces; the ethical responsibilities of museums; the preservation of archeological sites; forgeries and fakes; and the role of art in maintaining cultural heritage. Course work includes assigned readings, museum visits, short writing assignments, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 212 / ARCH 212. Understanding Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Fishman (fishmanr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/arch/212/001.nsf

This three-credit course is the principal introductory survey course in architecture. Using historical and contemporary examples, it examines the architect's role in society and the role of architecture and urban design in shaping the built environment. Upon completion of the course the student is expected to be able to identify and distinguish buildings constructed in different times, places, and societies; to discuss how architecture is and has been viewed and interpreted by various individuals and cultures; to analyze urban forms and spaces in relation to the buildings which make them up and the people who use them; and to develop and describe a personal attitude toward an understanding of the man-made environment.

The format consists of two one-hour lectures per week. Several design-related exercises requiring the student to experience, analyze, interpret, and report on aspects of the built environment will be required. The course is enhanced by weekly recitation sections. Recitation sections focus on improving the student's ability to venture into and sustain architectural discourse.

Required Reading:

  • Le Corbusier. Towards A New Architecture.
  • David Macaulay. City: A Story of Roman Planning and Construction.
  • David Macaulay. Cathedral: The Story of its Construction.
  • Carol Willis. Form Follows Finance: Skyscrapers and Skylines in New York and Chicago.
  • Course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 222 / CLARCH 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael L Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/clarch/222/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 251 / MEMS 251. Italian Renaissance Art, II.

Section 001 High Renaissance Italian Art, 1480-1570.

Instructor(s): Megan Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will study Italian art from circa 1480 to 1570. This period is traditionally known as the "High Renaissance," and usually begins with the maturity of Leonardo da Vinci and ends with the death of Michelangelo. We will follow the careers of major masters like Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo. We also will explore the urban centers Venice, Florence, Rome where these masters, and many others not as well known, produced their works in response to the demands of patrons and institutions. We will study key works of art, sites of production, techniques, patrons, practitioners, and publics. We will be interested in gender and social rank, and will visit the exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art "Gender, Power and Representation." Transformations in artistic practices and representational forms will be related to specific social, political, economic, and cultural conditions. We will also consider primary sources, and pay close attention to how art historians selectively consider the fragmentary material and textual remains from the period and incorporate them into a "story of art." There will be weekly section meetings, a midterm and final exam, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 272. 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of the work of major 20th-century European and American artists, focusing on two fundamental issues in particular: first, the manifold ways in which modern and avant-garde artists have interrogated the nature of signification itself (i.e., how form produces meaning); and, second, the avant-garde's controversial relationship to revolutionary politics. This streamlined survey course is specifically designed to assist you in developing the vocabulary, and the analytical and visual tools, that are essential in order to come to grips with the great diversity of works and critical debates that constitute the history of 20th-century art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 341. The Gothic Age.

Section 001 The Art of Medieval Paris.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the 13th and 14th centuries, the city of Paris was pre-eminent in the arts. Parisian artisans, serving a broad urban clientele, created trend-setting works of art that exerted an influence in all parts of Europe. The first part of this course which offers a basic introduction to Gothic art and architecture will be devoted to reconstructing the medieval city and to becoming acquainted with surviving architectural monuments (e.g., The Cathedral of Notre-Dame, the Sainte-Chapelle). The second part will concern the making and marketing of precious objects in all media: illuminated manuscripts, ivories, works in gold, silver and enamel, tapestries. Issues of royal, aristocratic, and bourgeois patronage will frequently come to the fore.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 384(431) / CLARCH 384. Principal Greek Archaeological Sites.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa Nevett

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 387(487) / ASIAN 360 / PHIL 360 / RCHUMS 375. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/360/001.nsf

See Asian Studies 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 393. Junior Proseminar.

Section 001 Baudelaire's Paris. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in history of art and upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with visual and literary culture in Paris during the Second Republic, the Second Empire, and the early years of the Third Republic. It takes as its focal point the essays, criticism, and poetry of Charles Baudelaire perhaps the most probing, and easily the most idiosyncratic and contentious observer of the cultural events of his time. Baudelaire's responses to the annual controversies of the Paris Salon, the caricatures of the daily press, the wholesale rebuilding of the capital under Louis Napoleon, and in a larger sense, to the concept of Romanticism, the experience of modern life, and the objectives of criticism itself, are crucial to our understanding of modernism in the visual arts. The course is accordingly designed to review recent theorizations of modernism (almost all of which locate the origins of their subject in the work of Courbet and Manet) in the context of a strongly historical reading of Baudelaire's various musings on painting, sculpture, caricature, and the city. It also aims to re-assess the advent of modernist painting in terms of its relation (antagonistic or complicitous) to a wide range of Parisian cultural phenomena from the somewhat narrow interests of professional artists and critics, to the broader consequences of urban modernization.

Requirements: Two fifty-minute tests, a short in-class presentation (@ fifteen minutes), and a long research paper (@15-20 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 Feminist Perspectives on Lesbian Studies. Meets with WS 347.001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, prints, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and twentieth century ones, we will investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 The Art and Poetry of Michelangelo.

Instructor(s): Thomas Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature of humanistic philosophy and cultural theory. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention as a means of grasping the substratum of rhetorical "figures" or "tropes" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his highly polished marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, as it were, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry notably the sonnet, the madrigal, and the epitaph as well as the critical vocabulary employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing and painting techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. In the course of the academic term we will study a considerable portion of his efforts in sculpture, painting and architecture, while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome. Students are expected to participate in discussion at every meeting. Several short papers on reading assignments will be required, and there will be a midterm slide exam with essay questions. A substantial research paper will be due by the end of the term. There will be a field trip to the Detroit Institute of Arts to see an exhibition of works by Michelangelo and his contemporaries.

Required text:

  • A modest coursepack;
  • The Poetry of Michelangelo, ed. James Saslow (Yale Univ. Press);
  • The Life of Michelangelo, by Ascanio Condivi (Pennsylvania State Univ. Press);
  • Michelangelo, by Anthony Hughes (Phaidon Press);
  • Lives of the Artists, vol. I, by Giorgio Vasari (Penguin Books);
  • A Short Guide to Writing about Art, by Sylvan Barnet, 7th edition (Longman).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 Enlightenment, Revolution, Empire.

Instructor(s): Susan Siegfried (seigfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course centers on the artistic culture of France, but also explores the significance of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire for art within a larger European context. The main themes we will work with are the nature of public art and how this was brought to a head by events of the French Revolution and the emergence of the Napoleonic Empire; the opportunities that opened up for artists, and the uncertainties they faced, following the shake-up of institutions and genre hierarchies; transformations in the imagery of gender and race; the roles played by women artists in the late Enlightenment; and the rise of caricature as a form of political commentary.

The course will include an oral report; quiz; and research paper (15-20 pages).

Required text:
Course pack.
Textbook recommended for purchase: S. Eisenman, ed., Nineteenth Century Art: A Critical History, 1995 or later edition

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 396. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. Permission of instructor required. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HISTART 396, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Honors Thesis writing course is a unit of independent study which will normally be under the direction of the student's principal thesis advisor. At the beginning of their senior year, students will register for the Honors Thesis writing course, HISTART 396. This is a four-credit, two-semester course, to be taken over Fall and Winter Terms (with a Y grade given at the end of the Fall Term). A student must have two faculty advisors for the Honors thesis. The "first reader" will be a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies. It will be his/her role to oversee the student's research and guide the direction taken by the thesis. The "second reader" is often equally involved with the thesis; but at a minimum that faculty member will read the first draft in order to suggest improvements and will read the finished product in order to evaluate it. The student is responsible for clarifying with both his/her readers exactly what their expectations are.

An Honors student pursuing a double concentration may write a single interdisciplinary thesis supervised by advisors from both departments of concentration.

The Honors thesis will vary in length depending upon the nature of the topic. It generally comprises thirty to fifty double-spaced type-written pages of text. It must conform to a traditional scholarly format sturdily bound in a thesis spring-binder or the like, with footnotes, bibliography, a list of illustrations, and illustrations adequate in number and quality to support the arguments of the paper. These illustrations may be in the form of drawings, photographs, or high quality photocopies. Application for a competitive grant of up to $200 may be submitted to The Honors Council Office of LS&A to help defray costs such as research travel, photography, and xeroxing. Forms are available from the Honors advisor.

Evaluation of the Honors Work: A grade is awarded for the thesis course (HISTART 396) only if the thesis is presented. When the thesis is completed, the two readers together with the Departmental Honors advisor evaluate the paper to determine its eligibility as Honors work. If the thesis meets Honors expectations, the readers and the Honors advisor will then determine whether the quality of the student's overall performance in the concentration, including on the thesis, merits Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors. The appropriate designation will appear on the student's final transcript.

Timetable for the Honors Thesis:

October 15 of Senior Year: Prospectus Form for the Honors Thesis, signed by first and second readers, must be submitted to the Honors advisor.

January 30 of Senior Year: First draft of the Honors thesis must be submitted to the first and second readers for their comments. Additional drafts may be required at the discretion of either reader.

April 10 of Senior Year: Deadline for submission of the thesis in its final form to the first and second readers simultaneously.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3; permission of instructor only

HISTART 403 / ENVIRON 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/nre/403/001.nsf

See Environment 403.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 415 / WOMENSTD 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 Gender & Visual Arts.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu), Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and one course in women's studies or history of art. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be on the Netherlands and Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from England, Spain and elsewhere. We will be looking at spaces and modes of production, such as courts, convents, and cities, and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations will concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. Other topics to be considered include the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 434 / CLARCH 434. Archaic Greek Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa Nevett

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 434.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 439 / CLARCH 439. Greek Vase Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 461. "Clashes" and Cultures: The Interconnected Visual Worlds of Eurasia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu), Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of instructor.

HISTART 473. Twentieth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 543.001.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/arch/543/001.nsf

The course offers a critical examination of the transformations in architectural theory and practice from the late 19th through the 20th century, with emphasis on elucidating the leadership struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of this period. Also considered is the link between theory and practice; the relationship between conceptual and aesthetic as well as technical factors; and the cultural, economic, social, and political context out of which they evolved.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 481 / CLARCH 481. Art of Ancient Iran.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the visual arts of ancient Iran from late prehistory to the Islamic conquest. It offers a broad overview of Iranian cultural heritage including its relations to the larger world within its orbits of interaction. The special goal of the course will be to place seals and other portable luxury arts in a charged analytical dialogue with programmatic visions of cult and kingship that were played out on the extraordinary tradition of rock carvings that inflect the natural landscape of Iran and the complexly nuanced messages of its royally-commissioned palatial environments.

HISTART 481 is a slide-lecture course that also features in-class discussion of readings and group work around artifacts in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

There will be two in-class quizes; One term paper submitted in two stages as a project proposal and as a full-fledged original research endeavor of about 15 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 Gender and Viewing. [3 credits]. Meets with WS 483.002.

Instructor(s): Susan Siegfried (seigfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We take it for granted today that viewing is gendered. The theories for analysing this gendering in the visual arts were pioneered by feminist film theory and literary criticism, as well as psychoanalysis. The course will study those models and their elaboration in feminist critiques of the visual arts. It will also attend to the historical question they raise, of how present-day theories of gender can be enlisted in the study of earlier art. Drawing on material from the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, we will examine the dynamics of gender in relation to the thematics of viewing and the social spaces of exhibition. The topics considered include the importance of female subjectivity in the production and consumption of paintings, the capacity of a work of art to gender the spectator's position, and the gendering of fantasies provoked by works of art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 Issues in Modern Sculpture and Theory. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Alexander Potts (adpotts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sculpture has been an important focus of discussion about the nature of visual art throughout the modern period. It is the purpose of this course to examine these debates as well as several of the key works which provoked them. In a sculpture, even where it is a structure or environment rather than an object, materiality counts for a lot. A sculpture is difficult to conceive of simply as an image, even though some of the more idealist theories of art, from the Neo-Classicism of the late eighteenth century to the conceptualism of the late twentieth century, have tried to do this. We shall be exploring changing attitudes to the tension that works of sculpture highlight between the image-like quality of works of art and their brute materiality.

A sculpture is art, but also a bit of the everyday world. As such, works of sculpture are locked into that process of modern consumerism whereby actual things in the world are endowed with immaterial value. Sculptures are useless things, but also things that take up space, that a viewer can wander around and even, in theory, through rarely in practice, actually touch. However, as soon as we envision sculptures as works of art, they are no less unreal than paintings, no less caught up in fantasies, beliefs, and ideology. We shall be concerned then with the history of an ever more rampant consumerism and the efforts artists and their audience have made to envision symbolically charged things that would not immediately be appropriated as consumer commodities.

Publicness, the idea of art as monument, has been an important feature of the multiple destinies of sculpture over the past two centuries sculpture being closely bound up with modern conceptions of public space and public value. Public sculptures are like useless bits of architecture. Yet they are also interventions in space that, however abstract, present themselves as having a public significance even Oldenburg's incongruously giant clothespeg or Serra's blackened steel walls or Henry Moore's biomorphic blobs. Modern culture celebrates endless change, to the point that "all that is solid melts into air," and yet it also hankers after permanence and monumentality. Sculpture, particularly public sculpture, is there, right at the centre of this split an at times uncomfortable, at times reassuring presence, both throw-away gesture and stable thing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 Labcoats in the Studio: Flying Cars, Flying buildings, and Mid-Century American Architecture. [3 credits]. Meets with Architecture 409.103.

Instructor(s): Kent Kleinman (kleinman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"It may well be that we hitherto understood as architecture and what we are beginning to understand of technology are incompatible disciplines."

P.R. Banham, Thaory and Design in the First Machine Age

Near the end of Banham's scathing review of European modernism, he observed that in many ways the architects of the machine age had, in effect, missed the boat (or rather the car). Corbusier was busily praising Ford for the perfection of an object type at pretty much the same time that Ford, unable to retool his production lines, was losing market share to the more nimble GM; Gropius, Loos and others were busily designing handsome but completely anachronistic automobiles while Americans Fuller and Bel Geddes were proposing radical teardrop shaped rear engine transportation machines and mechanical houses. As architects were proposing carefully configured icons of the machine age in Europe, Americans were coming to terms with the fact that the common ground between mass production and design was fabricating consumer desire rather than timeless artifacts.

The American technological and economic context during the period between the wars fostered a particular design sensibility and agenda that profoundly affected American architecture and design. Not surprisingly, given the proximity to the automobile industry, much innovative and inventive work emerged from the Midwest, in particular Michigan, where a model of design practice "geared" to industrial modes found root that attempted to address and redress the increasingly divergent trajectories of design and technology observed by Banham.

This seminar will be structured in two parts. Part I will map the American technological and cultural design context leading up to WWII. Readings will include selections from Lewis Mumford, Terry Smith, Aldous Huxley, Norman Bel Gedded, Reynor Banham, Jeffrey Meikle, and others. We will study the extraordinary designs of Geddes and Fuller, the arguably unspectacular, albeit critically important, designs of Kahnm, the artwork of Charles Sheeler, and the marketing and product design of Ford and Sloan (General Motors).

Part II will involve research into the work of select Michigan-based architects such as Albert Kahn, George Brigham, C.W. Lane, T. Larson, W. Oberdick and E. Saarinen. This part will involve direct use of primarily materials held in area archives, in particular the Bentley Historical Archives. Students will be expected to produce a research paper on a relevant subject of their choice using primary materials from the archive.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 004 Becoming Modern Architecture: An American [Case] Study. [3 credits]. Meets with Architecture 409.102.

Instructor(s): Kent Kleinman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Modern Architecture came to the United States in waves: In the early twenties, the Chicago Tribune Tower Competition not only introduced Saarinen's prototypical solution for the tall building but also didactic proposals of Europeans Hilbersheimer, Gropius and (even) Loos to an astonished American design community. In the mid twenties, the influence of the Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderne fueled the Art Deco movement and six years of exuberant building in New York City. In the early thirties, the Museum of Modern Art introduced four European "masters" and launched the Americanized version of modernism known since as the "International Style." By the end of the forties, émigrés Mies in Chicago and Gropius at Harvard were revamping the education of future American architects.

The introduction of architectural modernism to the United States and its transformation in a new social and economic context will be the subject of this seminar. Topics will include: The "telephone" game: early traffic in ideas from America to Europe and back again; the "other" modern: the 1925 Paris Exposition and the Art Deco movement in NYC; White-washed modernity: the Museum of Modern Art and the agenda of the "Modern Architecture: International Exhibition" show of 1932; The founding of the Museum of Non-objective Art (later the Guggenheim Museum); The Bauhaus spirit and the revolution in the American academy.

We will approach the evolution of American modernism from two distinct perspectives. The first part of the academic term will involve a broad review via secondary sources of the ideas, institutions, and individuals that shaped the reception and transformation of European architectural modernism in this country. The second part will take advantage of a unique opportunity to study this subject through the work of a single individual using primary sources (archived drawings, papers, and photographs) held at the University of Michigan's Bentley archive. Architect William Muschenheim (1902-1989) was influenced by, and contributed to, each of the topic areas listed above. Mucshenheim was a star student of the great German proto-modernist Peter Behrens. He worked with the theatrical Joseph Urban and the Art Deco master Ely Kahn in New York, participated in the "rejected architects" exhibition supported by Johnson of MoMA, was the architect of the first Guggenheim Gallery in New York, was an ardent supporter of educational reform in American schools of Architecture (and UM in particular), and built extraordinary projects (over 190!) exploring new materials and methods. The goal of this two-pronged approach will be to understand the general context in which modern architecture evolved in the United States and then to particularize this narrative with the work of one of its leading practitioners.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu), Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

R&E

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the wake of September 11, there is an urgent need to better understand just how interconnected are the peoples of Europe, Asia and the Middle East. In contrast to the tradition of nation-bounded historiography, this course explores what happens "when strangers meet." The problematic of cultural encounter is especially poignant in the history of art, which has long been allied to the rhetoric of nationalism. This course takes as its premise the polyvalency of cultural production and dialogue, and the fluidity of artistic movements across imaginary lines between "East" and "West." Utilizing specific instances of the partnership of politics, commerce and culture, the course navigates a range of options for understanding how peoples in one geographic region visualize themselves vis-à-vis others.

This course explores the interconnectedness of cultures across Eurasia through the prisms of visual culture and social practice. It questions historical assumptions about internally self-sufficient cultures, whether "Western" or "Asian." By focusing on transcultural practices, students will become familiar with alternatives to historically prominent paradigms of influence, cultural superiority, or colonial victimization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of instructor.

HISTART 584. Painting in Islamic Countries.

Section 001 Mughla India and the Coalescence of Visual Cultures.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From Rembrandt in the 17th century to Howard Hodgkin in the 20th, Mughal painting has inspired and enchanted artists, collectors, and scholars with its extraordinary pictorial richness and originality. This seminar seeks to understand the historical and social circumstances of the production and consumption of Mughal painting through close analysis of illustrated manuscripts, album pages, and primary source material. Students will explore the particularities of the visual idioms (Persian, Indic, European) that coalesced into this innovative representational language. Emphasis will be on artists and royal patrons, workshop and training practices, reception and aesthetic "grading," and rhetorical and ideological constructions that constituted the visual culture of Mughal India. Several recent exhibitions and seminal publications on Mughal painting enriched by retranslated or freshly translated royal memoirs, chronicles, and travel accounts make this an opportune moment to investigate the formation and trajectory of the Mughal style of painting. Active participation in class discussions, weekly readings and précis of assigned texts, two oral presentations, and a research paper constitute the grade. Visits to museums both near and far will be arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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