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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in College Honors


This page was created at 11:43 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 001 Cultural and Material Scavenging: Situations, Hip-Hop, and the Downfall of Judgment. Starts week of January 13 and ends week of February 17. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Gaurav Jashnani (gjashnan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

You came to college because your only other option is a job. Or is it?

Why do we listen to music, read books, watch movies? What can texts do for us - or to us? What does DJ Premier have in common with someone scraping together a living by curb-shopping? What is the relation between 'digging in the crates' and digging in a dumpster? And just what does "Act locally, think globally" mean on a practical level?

"First of all, we think that everything must be changed." With what would soon become the ubiquitous utopian gusto of their era, the Situationist International sprang (itself) into being, inaugurating a new age of millenarian prophesizing. With their mild-mannered credo ("The art of the future will be the construction of situations, or nothing at all"), the SI a haggard collective of self-righteous and alcoholic street urchins managed to introduce a critique of modernity that would infect the body politic, one that was directly or otherwise responsible for the brief overthrow of the French government in 1968. More importantly, the residue of their thought has seeped into our everyday life, spreading like the finest of contagions.

What does this have to do with hip-hop, as a music and a culture? Absolutely nothing, it may seem. But hip-hop is linked to the works of the SI in the same way that sampling itself is tied to philosopher Gilles Deleuze's view of his own work:

I myself 'did' history of philosophy for a long time. The main way I coped with it at the time was to see [it] as a sort of [expletive deleted] or (it comes to the same thing) immaculate conception. I saw myself as taking an author from behind and giving him a child that would be his own offspring, yet monstrous.

This methodological overlap, and the corresponding escape from morality and judgment that ensues from hip-hop's method of construction, is what we will explore, as well as issues of self-creation, gift, exchange, dreams, voice, nostalgia, desire and play.

In-class listening will include the Wu-Tang Clan, Freestyle Fellowship, MF Doom and Nas among others. Potential readings include excerpts from the following: - The Gay Science (Friedrich Nietzsche) - "The Southern Thruway" (Julio Cortazar) - Days of War, Nights of Love (CrimethInc.) - Rap Attack (David Toop) - Shadow and Act (Ralph Ellison) - Negotiations (Deleuze) - Various Situationist writings - Secret Origins: The Flash

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 002 Post Human Art and Culture. Starts week of January 13 and ends week of February 17. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Sosa (sosaj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to live in a world where Marshal Mathers is more black than Clarence Thomas, or where Ru Paul is more woman than KD Lang could hope to be? Or, better yet, where blackness is sold (e.g., FUBU), whiteness is bought (e.g., moving to the suburbs, or racial slurs like banana or oreo), and where our x and y chromosomes don't matter as much as the clothes we wear and the surgery we can elect? Some have defined this "reality" as a post-human world, a world where one's self, essence, or je ne sais quoi is defined in an ever growing web of commerce, technology, biology, and mass media. It is a world in which crossing the borders of ethnicity, gender, "race," and sexual orientation leave these categories without meaning.

In this seminar, we will look at contemporary cultural manifestations plastic art, cinema, theatre, stand-up and sketch comedy, music videos to see how this post-human culture is shaping itself before our very eyes. For a final project, participants will create their own interpretation of the post-human body in whatever medium they choose (2D, 3D, written, video, performed, musical, etc.).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 003 Community Action and the War on Poverty. Starts week of January 13 and ends week of February 17. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Brunner (jbrunner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

America today is a society characterized by extreme levels of inequality in income. Recent studies by the Congressional Budget Office have concluded that between 1979 and 1997, the after-tax incomes of the top 1 percent of families rose 157 percent, compared with only a 10 percent gain for families near the middle of the income distribution. These figures approach the disparities in income that characterized the levels of the Roaring Twenties and the Gilded Age, just before the Great Depression. But during the New Deal and post-WWII eras (1930s-1960s), the levels of income inequality between the richest and poorest dropped dramatically in the United States. America became a middle-class society in the 1960s, in which the salaries of experienced blue-collar workers rivaled those of lawyers, CEOs, and other professionals. Where, then, did the push for a "war on poverty" come from in a society that was already characterized by more egalitarian levels of income distribution? How did the decline of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty help to create and shape the current debate on poverty and inequality? What was the War on Poverty, exactly? This class will examine the War on Poverty in the 1960s, with particular emphasis on the Community Action Program of the Office of Economic Opportunity, with an aim to answer those questions. We will explore political, economic, and social/cultural explanations to these questions, and will examine how reform pressures from above collided and mixed with reform pressures from below to create the Community Action Program - the most controversial of all the Great Society programs, but also the least understood. Class will be structured around readings of both primary and secondary material, and one paper/final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 004 What Does It Mean to Be Human? Starts week of January 13 and ends week of February 17. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Mesiwala (amesiwal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be human? What is our place in the natural world? Fundamental questions about life have occupied philosophers for hundreds of years. In this course section, we will explore these questions by utilizing the knowledge and tools that science and philosophy affords us. In the process, we will read essays from authors like Daniel Dennet, Richard Dawkins, Edward O'Wilson, etc. As a supplement to our reading, we will take field trips from the laboratory to the art museums in search of finding some meaningful answers to the questions we contemplate. Students who enroll in this section should be willing to open up to their classmates with personal information (religion and background) and be committed to fulfilling the requirements of the class. Hopefully after our time exploring new ideas, we will leave with a broadened perspective of our humanity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 Organizational Behavior, Structure, & Dynamics: Behavior Of & In Organizations.

Instructor(s): John Tropman (tropman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/honors/250/001.nsf

This course examines the behavior in organizations as well as the behavior of organizations. We all work in "organizations." How does the organizational environment affect what we do and how we act? What are the main kinds of organizational cultures and how do we fit into them? Four cultures will be specifically explored: the clan culture, the hierarchy culture, the market culture, and the adhocracy culture. Implications for us personally will be considered. But organizations are also actors; organizations make, or do not make, decisions. They need to contend with rapidly changing environments, and those which fail to contend appropriately will become "boiled frogs." We will examine what characterizes organizations which learn and adapt, and what distinguishes them from those which are rigid, and die. Clearly issues of leading and managing play a crucial role in success or failure. We will look at what leadership is in an organizational context, and how it is distinguished from managing. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a term-long project, and report on it in the sessions after Spring Break.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 003 Alternative Realities: Science and the Study of Human Perception.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate a number of broad, highly subjective, inherently interesting questions about the nature of human perception. The broadest of these will be the question of cultural relativism: Do people from widely different cultures experience immediate reality in fundamentally different ways? The alternative realities to be explored will be those attributable to cultures, subcultures, cults, historical eras, substances (i.e., drugs), and mental illness. Most importantly, the scientific enterprise, as one mode among others, of establishing an order of reality will also be presented in this context. Grades will be determined by weekly commentaries and one paper written by each student.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 004 Law and Psychology.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt), as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill) with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues such as the insanity defense and battered wife syndrome. Each student will write a weekly commentary as well as a closing argument that will be presented to the class for one of the cases under consideration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 005 Race & Nation in Latin America. Meets with ANTHRCUL 258.001 and History 302.002.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/anthrcul/258/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 258.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 Numbers and Reasons.

Instructor(s): Fred L Bookstein (flb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an underclass course in how numbers are used in argument about patterns in the world. Initially it appears that these uses are diverse. Measurement in the natural sciences typically deals with true values (constants); measurement in the behavioral and social sciences, with problems of managing social systems. Measurements in sciences on the boundary, like neuropsychology or medicine, attempt with variable success to capture stable latent aspects of individual hidden states or histories. In this course we try to sort out much of this variation by careful attention to the logical role of quantification in the versions of reality constructed by the various disciplines we consider, from astrophysics through historical sociology. The approach is by various methods, including cognition, arithmetic, history of science, and the careful analysis of instrument readings, answers to questions, and various visual representations of same. Four specifically statistical themes least squares, the normal distribution, inverse probability, and regression are covered in brief lectures, but there is no associated "homework."

Reading load: heavy, about 1500 pages over the academic term, plus an optional reading list of some 75 additional volumes. Writing: Four short papers and a term paper Maximum class size - 12 Enrollment is by permission of the Honors Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 290. Honors Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HONORS 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HONORS 292. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HONORS 370. Junior Seminar on Research Methods.

Section 001 Psychological Aspects of Conflict Escalation, War, & Peace. [3 credits]. Meets with Psych 401.002.

Instructor(s): David Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/401/002.nsf

See Psychology 401.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 390. Junior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HONORS 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HONORS 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Complexity and Emergence. Meets for 8 weeks, January 16 through March 6, 2003. [2 credits]. Meets with Psych 401.010 and Psych 401.010. [Drop/Add deadline=January 29].

Instructor(s): John H Holland (jholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

Graduate Course Listings for HONORS.


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This page was created at 11:43 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.


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