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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Modern Greek


This page was created at 11:46 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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MODGREEK 102. Elementary Modern Greek, II.

Elementary Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Despina Margomenou

Prerequisites & Distribution: MODGREEK 101. Graduate students should elect MODGREEK 502. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course follows the same pedagogical scheme as Modern Greek 101, with classroom dialogues, non-competitive group games, and improvised scenarios. Instruction in more advanced grammar and syntax is effected through both formal methods and drills. By the end of the term students are exposed to approximately four-fifths of modern Greek grammar and syntax and are expected to be linguistically competent in a variety of everyday contexts. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, a one hour midterm exam, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MODGREEK 105. Elementary Modern Greek Conversation.

Elementary Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: MODGREEK 101. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MODGREEK 202. Second Year Modern Greek, II.

Elementary Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Despina Margomenou

Prerequisites & Distribution: MODGREEK 201. Graduate students should elect MODGREEK 504. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the final term of the Modern Greek language sequence, and, upon successful completion, students will be able to meet the LS&A language requirement. The course focuses on expanding vocabulary through reading more complex journalistic prose and literary texts (20th-century poetry and prose) and discussion of those texts. Special attention is paid to the historical depth of the language through instruction in etymology. The proficiency gained by the end of the course should enable students to express themselves in Modern Greek on topics of interest; students ought to be able to read, with dictionary help, all writing in Standard Modern Greek. Along with class participation, class tests, one midterm, and a final examination will determine the final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MODGREEK 205. Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation, I.

Elementary Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: MODGREEK 201. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MODGREEK 318 / AMCULT 318. Greek-American Culture.

culture courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vassilios Lambropoulos (vlambrop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While Greek culture, thought, and values have always been studied and revered in the U.S., the actual Greeks who immigrated to this country were received differently. They faced many forms of discrimination and exclusion that often led them to protests, marches, strikes, demands for equal rights, and alliances with minority groups. This course studies that particular migrant group, a unique case in American race history: the arrival and settlement of Greeks, a people admired in theory and reviled in practice.

The story is one of dissociation between image and reality, identity and ethnicity, discourse and experience, as the American public distinguished the cultural legacy of Hellenism from the immigrating Hellenes.* While Greece stood as an abstract ideal, the actual Greeks appeared dark, barbaric, Eastern (as opposed to Western), lazy, intemperate, dishonest, and above all racially and mentally degenerate in sharp contrast to those they claimed as ancestors. Sometimes even Greeks themselves began treating each other in similar terms.

*By examining Greek American history, culture, practices, and institutions, this course studies a test case of complex discrimination that includes racial, ethnic, religious, linguistic, gender, class, cultural, and several other elements. It analyzes the successes and the pitfalls of collective identity as it has been understood in this country over the last two centuries by following the Greeks' gradual ascendancy to whiteness, Hellenization, Europeanization, middle class status, heterosexual normality, public recognition, and assimilation. Students will be required to complete assigned readings and write two 8-page papers based on drafts.

This dissociation between modern Greeks and "real," that is ancient, Greeks is still evident today in course offerings everywhere as College listings distinguish between "Modern Greek" and "Greek" classes whereby the latter, apparently considered "more authentically Greek," do not require to be qualified as "Ancient."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

MODGREEK 340 / COMPLIT 340. Travels to Greece.

culture courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Artemis S Leontis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/modgreek/340/001.nsf

Travel to Greece holds many promises: the thrill of escape, renewal, exploration, acquisition, and self-discovery, as well as the pleasure of conveying these experiences in writing. Indeed, centuries of travel to the land of gods and myths have produced volumes of travel writing, a form that continues to be popular today with a broad reading public. At its best, this writing is exciting and thought provoking, as it conveys both an exterior voyage to a legendary land detailed information about places, peoples, and things encountered on the way and an interior voyage of self discovery. This course aims to introduce students to the rich literature of travel to Greece and the issues it raises about the relations of the traveler to the worlds encountered, their history and their tradition. Therefore, it will examine questions of alterity, representation, exoticism, ethnography, Orientalism, the "burden of the past," and Western imagination.

A wide range of readings will include works by British, French, German, and American authors such as Lady Montagu, Chateaubriand, Lord Byron, Lamartine, Flaubert, Twain, Brandes, V. Woolf, Freud, H. Miller, Malraux, Durrell, Fermor, Storace, and Keeley. Considering Greece as a contact zone between visitors and local residents, the course will also study travel essays by Greek authors, including Kazantzakis, Seferis, Ouranis, Karapanou, and others. Different media, including films, photos, etchings, drawings, and paintings, as well as travel programs on television and radio and travel sites on the Internet will give a measure of comparison..Undergraduates. 3 hours per week in lecture format.

Students will be required to complete assigned readings and write 7 short responses to readings or audio-visual materials; 2 short papers and 1 long paper will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MODGREEK 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate supervised study in Modern Greek literature. Number of meetings determined by the credits elected. Regular reports and conferences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for MODGREEK.


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