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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars


This page was created at 11:48 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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A total of 20 credits of LHSP courses may be counted toward the minimum 120 credits required for an LS&A degree.


LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 High Tech Community: Digital Yearbook. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Dave Peters

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to help create an electronic version of the LHSP community. We'll examine what it means to be a community while archiving its development. Learn new skills as we document the 2002-2003 year, capturing classes, events, field trips, parties, and candid residence hall experiences. Learn interviewing, photo, editing, and technical skills. The yearbook will be distributed on a CD to each LHSP student at the end of the academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 Academic and Career Exploration. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Jean Rhee

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will help you focus on yourself, your academic plans, summer internships, and potential career choices, emphasizing the many resources both inside and outside the University. It will include using interest inventories and personality type indicators as well as several on-line resources. Students will learn how to create resumes, build portfolios, and develop professional interviewing skills. One class will be held at the UM Career Center (formally known as the CP&P).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 100. Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 003 Solving Hunger and Homelessness. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/lhsp/100/003.nsf

The course will meet bi-weekly. Schedule will be given on the first day of class. This class will not only discuss the issues of hunger but also do something about it! Students will volunteer with an organization that helps to feed or house those in need. We'll read and reflect on hunger and homelessness. The class will get to know first hand some of the ways people cope with poverty. We'll look at different approaches to these issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 001 Makes Me Wanna Holler...The American Musician as Social Commentator. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Kimberly Haynes

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In nearly every culture, musicians have played an important role as the recorders and repositories of social and cultural history. However, music history is also full of examples of artists whose works crossed the line from strict observation to social commentary. Through a survey of American (US) music, we will explore the role of music and musicians in both the promulgation and mediation of political, social, and cultural conflict. We will begin by exploring the potential role of music in the construction of personal, group, and national identity, with each student being challenged to define his/her own identity in the context of their musical choices. Then, after a brief look at America's European musical heritage, we will focus on American classical, folk, and popular musical styles, including: African American Spirituals, Jazz, Gospel, and Blues; Rock and Roll and Pop Music; and Hip-Hop and Rap. The class will feature a combination of reading and listening assignments, and will gravitate toward textual analysis of popular musical styles that will be generally accessible to most students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 002 Beyond the Fear and Confusion: Understanding AIDS. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Tim Martin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An estimated 40 million people live with HIV/AIDS worldwide. The American public has known about the disease for about two decades but, for many, the epidemic remains shrouded in mystery. In this course, students will discuss and examine the many facets of this disease and those infected with it. Topics will include medical facts about the disease and its transmission, discrimination against AIDS victims, stereotypes associated with the disease, and AIDS in Africa. In discussing these and other topics, students will view the movie Philadelphia and read Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. This course will also include a mandatory volunteer component.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 003 The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Examining Global Conflict. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Ben McDonough

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using Thomas Friedman's popular work, The Lexus and the Olive Tree, we will examine several forms of global conflict including that of ethnicity, economics, and religion. Much of the class will be devoted to discussion, hands-on activities, and field trips. We will also use recent articles and periodicals, keeping the class up-to-date with current world events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 004 Judging the Verdict: Law and Legal Careers. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Liz Moody

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will meet bi-weekly. Schedule will be given first day of class. The course will be divided into two units. In one unit, we will explore the role that the law plays in our daily lives by discussing criminal statutes, law enforcement, and judicial procedures. In the other unit, we will be introduced to legal scholarship, education, and the legal profession. We will explore various legal cases, examine the various branches of law, and discuss how law schools approach learning. Events may include mock trials, mock client interviews, and guest speakers from the public and private sectors. Students will be required to visit a local court session and complete assignments based on their experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 005 If all the World's a Stage...Where's the Crew? [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you ever wanted to work backstage in the theater? Want to see what makes participating in community theater so much fun? Here's your chance to find out first hand. Ann Arbor's Burns Park Players are putting on The Music Man this winter. The Burns Park Players is a non-profit neighborhood organization which has been putting on musicals for 20 years. All of the proceeds from the productions will directly benefit the Arts Programming in Ann Arbor's elementary schools. Come be a part of a great tradition and learn how to make scenery and props for this fun musical! Come dressed in old clothes prepared to have fun and work hard! Due to the nature of theater, a significant time commitment is necessary. Our first meeting will be held Tuesday, January 7th, from 8:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. in the Art Studio at Alice Lloyd Hall. Thereafter we will be meeting at the Auditorium of Tappan Junior High School to work on the play. You may choose from the following work schedule: Saturdays (Jan.11th, 18th, 25th, and Feb.1st ) OR Sundays (Jan. 12th, 19th, 26th, and Feb.2nd). (We will work from 1pm-6pm approximately.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Section 006 No Fight, No Flight: Nonviolent Conflict Resolution. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Charlotte Whitney

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the tradition of Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., we will explore the theoretical underpinnings of nonviolence and its place in history. We will use a series of readings, experiential exercises, and guest speakers to explore nonviolent conflict resolution, beginning with interpersonal relationships, progressing to groups, and on to international strategies. Come prepared to learn a number of hands-on approaches to conflict resolution,as well as examining some major international conflicts currently in the news.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 112. Studies in Social and Political History I.

Section 001 There's More to Love than War: Exploring the Middle East.

Instructor(s): Dave Peters

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It's always in the news, but how well do we really understand what happens in the Middle East? This course will explore contemporary events in the Middle East from a historical perspective, introducing students to a variety of themes in contemporary Middle Eastern politics through that lens. We'll explore the emergence of political Islam in the Middle East, examine the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, discuss the role of the United States in the region, and ask questions about ways in which the media portrays the events that occur in the Middle East.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 112. Studies in Social and Political History I.

Section 002 There's More to Love than War: Exploring the Middle East.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It's always in the news, but how well do we really understand what happens in the Middle East? This course will explore contemporary events in the Middle East from a historical perspective, introducing students to a variety of themes in contemporary Middle Eastern politics through that lens. We'll explore the emergence of political Islam in the Middle East, examine the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, discuss the role of the United States in the region, and ask questions about ways in which the media portrays the events that occur in the Middle East.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 001 The Novels of Toni Morrison: A World of Conflict.

Instructor(s): Tim Martin

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The literature of Toni Morrison thrives on conflict. Whether it contrasts good and evil, the real and the magical, beauty and ugliness, or many other distinctions, Morrison's storytelling incorporates opposing forces and the conflicts they create as a means of framing her tragic plots. While in the end these "opposites" are not as dissimilar as we might assume, their presence creates tremendous conflict within Morrison's literary world. In this course, we will analyze external, non-physical conflict like racism and sexism, internal conflicts, and the manifestation of those conflicts into physical violence such as rape and murder. The reading includes three novels written by Toni Morrison. With these texts as our guide we will structure argumentative essays around these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 002 You Must be Mad! Literary Depictions of Insanity as Social Rhetoric.

Instructor(s): Liz Moody

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be "insane," and why are we so uncomfortable with the concept? How are "different" thoughts and ideas often construed as the product of mental disease (and subsequently discredited)? How does mental illness set one apart from society and how does it, at the same time, seem to stem from a lack of meaningful or normal social interactions? What is the significance of these social rifts associated with insanity? Drawing mostly on fictional accounts, we will explore how "different" lifestyles, cultural groups, and ways of thinking are marginalized by being categorized as insane and how different authors use "insane" characters to facilitate their social commentary. We will use a number of texts and films featuring insane or unreliable characters and ask, among other questions, to what extent their mental illness leads us to discredit them and what it adds to or subtracts from their accounts. We will then discuss how the concept of mental illness is being used in each text by those in power as a tool to discredit those who challenge their ideals and ask whether the authors seem to be sympathetic or critical to the phenomena they describe. Readings will draw on short fiction, poetry, and novels. Such works may include William Shakespeare's King Lear, Michael Foucault's Madness and Civilization, Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, and selections from author's such as Stephen King, Nikolai Gogol, William Styron, Charlotte Perkins Gillman, and Eudora Welty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 003 Who Gets Control? Conflicts of Sexuality, Reproduction, and Morality

Instructor(s): Patty Skuster

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/lhsp/125/003.nsf

Your sexuality is your business. Or is it? The rights and wrongs of sexual reproduction are spelled out in United Nations Treaties, Supreme Court opinions, papal decrees, presidential edicts, and congressional legislation. In short, public rules govern sexual reproduction rules that all law-abiding citizens should follow. But whose values underlie the law and policy of sexual reproduction? Do we all agree on a common sexual morality? What happens when notions of morality are in conflict? This class examines conflicting ideas of sexual reproduction and how sexuality is defined in the public arena. Law and policy have definite answers to difficult questions: Can we stop teens from having sex? Is polygamy immoral? Is contraception a medical need? Should poor women have children? Can lesbian and gay couples be sanctified? And, what of abortion? This class will engage in readings, discussions, and writings in order to discover what values are expressed in reproductive law and policy in the U.S. and around the world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 125. College Writing.

Section 004 American Public Schools: Are They Doing Their Job?

Instructor(s): Sara Woodward

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Education reform has been a hot topic of debate since the Columbine shootings three years ago. From Capitol Hill to dining room tables, our nation seems to agree that something is terribly wrong with our public schools, but there is no consensus about what should be done. Are teachers lazy or underpaid? Do school vouchers and charter schools provide much needed competition for failing public schools, or are they just a sneaky way to drain resources from the neediest children? Why is there a persistent "achievement gap" between the performance of black and white students, inner-city and suburban schools? Who is to blame for this achievement gap parents, students, schools, or a racist society? Do we simply need to give schools and teachers more money, or do we need to overhaul the entire American public education system? In this course we will do three things: first, we will examine our own conception of what public education is supposed to accomplish. Next, we will take a deep look at the reality of American schools: from preschool to high school, from suburban to urban campuses, and from the college application process to the juvenile justice system. Finally, we will discuss proposed avenues of change, such as charter schools, schools of choice, vouchers, and the small school movement. Students will read and discuss the opinions of those on all sides of the political spectrum, forming their own arguments for what they believe should be done. This course will be a combination of learning through the reading and writing of others such as scholars, educators, and policy-makers, as well as reflection of the student's own educational experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 002 Imagining the Future: Digital Storytelling.

Instructor(s): Marianne Ryan

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Do you wonder how the world will be transformed during the 21st century? This course combines creative writing skills with interactive multimedia design. We'll explore science fiction films and stories and develop our own futuristic scenarios. Students will learn to integrate text, sound, and visual elements to communicate with an online audience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 003 The Spice of Life: Exploring American Identity.

Instructor(s): Jean Rhee

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the various ways in which writers have defined the ideals, aspirations, conflicts, and visions that comprise American culture. We will focus mainly on fiction by minority authors who comment on the tension between their ethnic identities and mainstream American culture, and the constant struggle involved in becoming a "real American." The proposed reading list includes: Unsettling America (a collection of multicultural poems), Anzia Yezierska's The Open Cage, Gus Lee's China Boy, and Toni Morrison's Beloved.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 004 To Paint or Not to Paint...

Instructor(s): Mark Tucker

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Now that computers, digital cameras, CD burners and scanners have become as common place as owning a television set, the question has to be: "Why make art the old-fashioned way?" Many art professionals believe that art/design programs will "either perish or remain curious and perhaps interesting anomalies-like alchemy and astrology"* if they do not try to keep up with sweeping global changes and emerging technologies. But learning how to draw and paint is as basic a human need as learning how to read and write. New and emerging technologies are tools. Pencils and paintbrushes are tools. Particularly because we inhabit such a dominantly visual culture, people (not just artists) need to be able to 'see' and to learn how to 'communicate' visually. The tools, whether they are electronic or otherwise, simply facilitate our ability to see and express what we see. In this course we will spend a minimal amount of time learning how to draw (or how to record what we 'see') and skip right to the exciting challenge of learning how to 'see' in color. We will learn basic color theory, reproduce a well-known painting, paint 3-dimensional still-life(s), and finally paint the human figure. No prior experience is necessary and everyone will benefit from their new-found 'sight'. This is a rigorous course with extensive assignments outside of class studio time. Note: This course will require the purchase of various art materials related to drawing and painting. A specific list of materials will be available on the first day of class. There is also a studio fee of $50, which will cover the hiring of the model(s). There may also be field trips to museums, which will be scheduled separately. *From the University of Michigan School of Art and Design's Restructured Undergraduate Program (April 2002 Draft).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 005 Drawing with Gusto.

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Learn the basics from technical understanding to experimental freedom. Are tone, texture, perspective, and lighting a big mystery to you? You'll learn to draw using trade secrets and discover the confidence you had as a child- writing on walls. Take the charcoal in hand and scribble. Learn different ideas behind drawing, both old and new, and see how it changes your perception of the world. Personal journals and two papers will be required. Grading is based upon participation and growth, so don't be afraid to try. Only two absences are allowed to be made up with extra work. Each additional absence will lower your final grade. Drawing materials will be provided, but wear clothes that can get dirty. Lab fee: $25.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

LHSP 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 006 Advanced Art Expression.

Instructor(s): Tucker

Prerequisites & Distribution: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Shakespeare's Coriolanus. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams, David Potter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Shakespeare's Coriolanus, the last of his great Roman plays, focuses on the relationship between a mother and her warrior son, Martius, the human equivalent of the God of War. In greater terms, it addresses the nature of a political life driven by mutual antagonisms. More importantly, the play focuses on the contempt between an upper class society accustomed to inherited power and the common people who crave power. This course is offered in conjunction with the residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company who will be performing Coriolanus. We will examine Shakespeare's Roman sources for this play, watch his particular treatment of those sources, and discuss both the text of the play and the performance of the RSC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Get on the Bus 2003: In Search of America's Civil Rights Movement. [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Joe Gonzalez (joegon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~onthebus

In this course, you will visit the people and places of America's Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968. During Spring Break, 2003, you will see the sites of Martin Luther King's birth and assassination, as well as locations central to the Movement, from Mississippi to Washington, DC. Along the way, you will meet people who risked their lives in the struggle for civil rights, often when they were no older than you are now. The requirements for this class are simple. For the trip, you must keep a detailed journal of your impressions and experiences. If previous years offer any indication, the cost of this trip will be very modest to you.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 The Magic and Mystery of St. Petersburg. Meets beginning March 5.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will meet with seven weeks straight, beginning March 5th. St. Petersburg, which celebrates its 300th anniversary this year, is a major center of world culture, famous for its art, architecture, splendid palaces, and the many works of literature it has spawned. The city is both a statement of imperial power (founded by Peter the Great to be a "window onto Europe") and a mysterious, even diabolical city in the eyes of many artists. It is mysterious, magical, and seductive. This course will introduce the city in its glory, its mystery, and its intriguing contradictions. We will look at art, history, and literature, and will make use of multi-media and Internet resources to explore St. Petersburg in its many incarnations. This course will consist of informal classes, discussions, and one paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Section 001 Advanced Academic and Professional Development [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Lindner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Section 002 [Drop/Add deadline=January 24].

Instructor(s): Whitney

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LHSP 228. What is Writing?

Section 001 What is Writing?

Instructor(s): Ray McDaniel, Ben McDonough

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Any inquiry into the nature of writing depends upon an equivalent query into the nature of audience: before we can examine the full array of writing options available to us, we must consider for whom we write. This course will familiarize students with a range of contexts defining questions of audience and offers approaches to the act of writing tailored to these contexts. Throughout the term, students will refine their abilities to recognize and adapt to multiple audiences; students will reflect on the different ways writers talk of audience, voice, style and composition in their varied disciplines and fields. The lecture series will feature university and community speakers and discussants accomplished in both the writing of their respective fields and the teaching of those fields' particulars. We will collaborate with professionals in publishing and editing; law and legal culture; sociology and social work; medicine and associated health fields; and history, literature and journalism. We will abstract from these collaborations both a sense of what skills are shared by all disciplines and how these skills are best adapted to the rhetorical and discipline-specific requirements of each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LHSP 229 / ENGLISH 229. Technical Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 229.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for LHSP.


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