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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 11:49 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the origins and development of Western political thought. It will focus on the normative foundations of political theory, the attempts to distinguish among different regime-types with an emphasis on democratic politics, its defenders and critics, the transformations brought about by the rise of Christianity, the debates and arguments related to the intertwinement of religion and politics, the tide of secularization opened up by Renaissance and the Reformation, and finally the emergence of the modern state. Issues related to the modalities of political power and its representation, the relationship between politics and morality, the sources and scope of sovereignty, the concept of political freedom, the quest for justice, the role of the individual in the political community, the effects of wealth and private property, the nature of citizenship, and the various justifications of political obligation, mostly related to social contract theories, will be of central importance. Selected writings from Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Tacitus, Livy, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, the Federalist Papers, Tocqueville, Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Constant, Mill, Marx, Weber, Schmitt, and Arendt.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to the study of American politics. Students will learn many of the central concepts and findings from the vast literature in political science devoted to understanding the American political system. There will be an emphasis on comparing the current operation of the American political system to systems in other countries and in previous eras in the United States, and in comparing the operation of systems within the United States across different levels of government and across states. There will be two lectures and one discussion section per week, in-class tests, and several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/140/001.nsf

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings - and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and India. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/160/001.nsf

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by presenting basic concepts like national power and reviewing well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events. The course requires two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 300. Contemporary Political Issues.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/syllabus.html

POLSCI 300 takes up issues that are the focus of contemporary political debate in the United States, such as taxes and spending, poverty, racial and ethnic injustice, public education, and relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world. Curiosity, initiative, and a willingness to examine ideas and "facts" critically are the essential prerequisites of the course. We will read, listen, discuss, write, and do a lot in POLSCI 300, consistent with its four credit-hour value. A significant part of your final grade depends not only on how well you demonstrate your mastery of the course material but also on how conscientiously you contribute to the learning of others, primarily through your active and informed participation in class discussions. If you are not prepared to do that, don't take the course. Grading is on a standard 100-point system. You will write seven 750-word papers over the course of the academic term, worth 70 points altogether. The other 30 points is based on your contribution to discussions about the readings, participation in relevant out-of-class activities, and sharing your reflections about those experiences with your classmates. We do not grade on a curve.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 306(406). American Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne M Manuel

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take as its basis the study of canonical texts in American political thought. The ideas that have shaped American politics are heterogeneous and conflicting. We will analyze these tensions through the close reading of primary texts. We will consider the major conceptual foundations of American politics: democracy, freedom, limited government, individualism, toleration, and civil and political equality. These concepts will be considered in the light of other important traditions that have shaped American citizenship. These other traditions include the emphasis on local communities, the work ethic, capitalist labor market organization, class mobility, race based oppression, and gender inequality in the public and private spheres.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to think, speak, and write critically about the core concepts that shape the American political system and make up the American tradition in political thought. They should have a good understanding of what these concepts are, where they originated, and how the work together, and against each other, to form a dynamic, evolving national discourse. An analytic approach will be emphasized. By the end of the course, students should be able to discuss the nation's ongoing process of "re-founding", the often controversial process of national re-defining and re-imagining done in relation to national principles. Exploring contests, conversations, and debates within and about the texts we read, we will traverse the intellectual terrain that is the foundation of our national self-understanding. Course requirements will consist of take-home essays and in-class written group assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 314(483). American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 315(484). Media and Public Opinion.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/315/001.nsf

In this course we examine the effects of the media on the beliefs, values, and choices of citizens. We will review evidence of media influence in a number of areas:

  • public priorities and evaluations of government;
  • attitudes toward foreign policy;
  • formation of group identities and stereotypes;
  • support for public policies; learning about and choosing candidates in elections.

The course considers the impact of newspapers, radio, TV, and the Internet, and covers special topics such as campaign advertising, debates, films, cartoons, and ordinary discussion. Class will consist of lecture and discussion, and evaluations will be based on exams and papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 317(412). Courts, Politics and Society.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The American judicial process its structure, logic, and myriad legal and political functions is the central focus of this course. We will begin the academic term with an analysis of the role of courts in three policy domains: the management of disputes; criminal punishment; and implementation of social and institutional reform. We will subsequently explore those elements that distinguish courts from other political institutions through an examination of the nature of judicial reasoning and the choices and constraints that shape decisionmaking in this context. The term will conclude with a discussion of the origins and consequences of cross-national differences in the propensity of citizens and interest groups to take their disputes to court.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 319(414). The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven B. Dow

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examines a number of Supreme Court decisions in the field of civil liberties and civil rights. In addition to delineating the political significance of the decisions, some emphasis is also placed on the dynamics of compliance with the Court's stated policy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 324(419) / CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science; CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. The course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. Finally, the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 325(420) / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/comm/484/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 338(478). Political Economy of Transition.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson (jjacksn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/338/001.nsf

The major theme of the course is to examine the joint processes of political and economic transformation. Successful transitions are largely evolutionary. New organizations and institutions arise to replace older, outmoded forms of production and governance. Most of the course will be devoted to examining a series of countries and regions that have chosen or been forced into some form of economic and political transition. The examples will include a wide array of countries, ranging from countries moving from centrally planned economies and one-party authoritarian governments to a market economy and democratic governments to developed democracies needing to transform their own economies in the face of global competition and new technologies. Readings include writing by Schumpeter, Krugman, Elster, Przeworski, Kornai, Sachs, Hellman, and Jackson, among others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 340(442). Governments and Politics in Western Europe.

Comparative

Section 001 Political Systems of Major European Countries.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This comparative course introduces the political systems of major European countries like France, Germany, Great Britian, and Italy as well as those of selected smaller countries. It is not primarily a course on European Union politics, although the structure of the emerging EU political system will be discussed. The course has a twofold purpose: first, it provides students with a basic knowledge of the aforementioned political systems; second, it is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the varities of democracy currently practised in Europe as well as of different social and economic structures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 358(458). Politics of the European Union.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christophe Crombez

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course studies current issues and developments in the European Union (EU) and its member countries. The first part of the course looks at the countries. It analyzes different aspects of parliamentary government: electoral rules, party systems, government formation processes, and their impact on policies. We focus on the Dutch elections (January 2003) and on principal developments in other countries. The second part of the course studies the EU. It presents an overview of its history, institutions, and policies. We focus on two major developments in the EU today: enlargement and the convention on the future of Europe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 360(460). Problems in World Politics.

World

Section 001 Political Responses to Globalization.

Instructor(s): Jude Hays

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/360/001.nsf

This course is about globalization politics. It explores the political responses within the advanced industrial democracies to the globalization of markets and the likely policy consequences of these responses. The course is organized around key actors involved in the political battles over globalization. We begin by examining how recent trends in the development of international trade and financial markets impact different producer groups in society and then shift our attention to the broad political coalition that makes up the heterogeneous anti-globalization movement. We also examine the mass politics of globalization by looking at how individual attitudes about economic integration and trade are changing in Europe and the United States. We consider how the behavior of political and economic organizations--labor unions, for example--is evolving and how individual politicians, political parties, and governments are responding to the new demands and constraints caused by economic globalization. Is globalization irreversible? How serious is the emerging backlash against globalization? Will it be a political force? To help answer these difficult questions, we finish up the course by turning to the past and comparing the current situation with the globalization backlash of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 370(470). Comparative Foreign Policy.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in POLSCI. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches to foreign policy analysis. Particular attention is given to assessing approaches that attempt to explain behavior, such as spending in alliances, without reference to the states' domestic political systems; to those that emphasize the key role of internal political processes in explaining how states behave internationally, and to those that suggest that for many states similarities across issue area may be more crucial in defining the policy process than the nature of the states themselves. There is a midterm, a paper, and the final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 379(479). Advanced Topics in Foreign Policy.

World

Section 001 Chinese Foreign Policy.

Instructor(s): Ellis Joffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topic of this lecture course will be Chinese Foreign Policy. It addresses three basic questions:

  • What does China want in the world, and why?
  • What resources do China's leaders have at their disposal to achieve their objectives?
  • What has been the record of their activities in the international arena since the establishment of the communist regime in 1949?

The first part examines China's traditional world view and shows how its collapse gave rise to the main force that drives Chinese foreign policy today modern Chinese nationalism. The second assesses China's economic and military power. The third part looks at the 50 year plus record of China's activities abroad. Requirement: exam at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 380 / ENVIRON 312 / NRE 312. Environmental Politics and Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry George Rabe

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Environment 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 Comparative Elections & Electoral Reform. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/389/001.nsf

This course examines the question of how citizens select politicians, parties and policies. The rules and procedures that govern elections have a powerful influence on the sorts of choices voters are offered, what sorts of coalitions politicians form, and whose interests get represented in the policymaking process. This course will investigate what rules matter, how and why they matter, and will draw on a broad array of cases to examine the issues at stake in debates about electoral reform, both in the United States and abroad.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 Perspectives on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. March 5-April 16. [ 1 credit]. Meets with Judaic Studies 317.003 and MENAS 334.001. [Drop/Add deadline=March 18].

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler (tessler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In discussions and debates about the Israel-Palestinian conflict, each side frequently seeks to demonize the other and to deny the legitimacy of its fears and aspirations. This one-credit course will strive to offer a more balanced and constructive perspective. As part of this effort, it will feature presentations by prominent and mainstream Palestinian, Israeli, and other analysts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 391(185). Introduction to Modeling Political Processes.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (SS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the use of models as a way of developing theories about social science phenomena such as competition for votes, conflict over territory, outbreaks of protest, alliances in business and politics, or even patterns of marriage. The models covered in the course involve many different processes such as rational choice, learning, and social diffusion. Some are mathematical and others computer-based. After a general introduction to the reasons for using models in developing theories, the course concentrates on developing modeling skills: constructing, manipulating, evaluating, and revising models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 396 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Comparative

Section 001 The Political Economy of Transformation in Eastern Europe. Meets with Anthropology 317.001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rees/396/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Manuel

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 001 Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/460/001.nsf

This course is a chronological survey of the history of early modern and modern political thought. It begins in the 16th century with the study of Machiavelli and ends in the late 19th century with Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche. The other thinkers include Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, Edmund Burke and John Stuart Mill. Despite the 300-year span between the first and the last, each thinker confronted, in his or her own way, the central aspect of the modern world: that the world was rapidly and profoundly changing. Old values, beliefs, technologies and political systems were under constant challenges, and the authors tried to make sense of those challenges, celebrate them, or warn against them. That makes the study of each relevant in the early 21st century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 002 International Conflict: Causes and Consequences.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/460/002.nsf

We begin by discussing four interrelated arguments about the possibility of cooperation in the international system. We then turn to consideration of actual patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in a series of papers and one essay exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 003 Problems in World Politics.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/460/003.nsf

In this course the subjects addressed will be divided into two broad areas. First, U.S. arms control and nuclear weapons policies will be examined with a focus on the proliferation of nuclear weapons, ballistic missile defense, and nuclear arms control with Russia. Second, the international politics of civil wars will be studied with a focus on the causes of civil war, when outside intervention is expected, and what impact outside intervention has on civil wars. Readings will focus on basic research on each of these topics while lectures will supplement the readings by considering how current international events and U.S. foreign policy behavior compare with the findings of more basic research. Grades will be based on written in-class exams and a research paper written over the course of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 004 American Political Process.

Instructor(s): Arthur Lupia (lupia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students have an opportunity to acquire a range of skills that are imperative to the making and evaluation of political decisions in particular, and public policy in general. The skills students will acquire include:

  • Identifying and constructing persuasive political and policy arguments,
  • A basic understanding of microeconomics, with special emphasis on how taxes, subsidies, and other government actions affect the relationship between supply and demand,
  • A basic understanding of how individual preferences interact with electoral and legislative institutions to affect political decision making,
  • Understanding the conditions under which policies are implemented and enforced as their sponsors intend, and,
  • Serving on a debate team that is responsible for constructing and defending an argument on a current political or policy topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 460. Advanced Writing in Political Science.

Section 005 Politics of India.

Instructor(s): Ashutosh Varshney (varshney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Intended for Political Science concentrators who are satisfying the Upper-Level Writing Requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/460/005.nsf

This course is primarily intended for upper-level undergraduates. (Graduate students seeking specialization in South Asian politics and political economy are also welcome. Their requirements, predictably, will be different from those for the undergraduates.)

India's chronicle of many achievements coexists with a record of many unresolved problems. With a primary focus on the 20th century, this course concentrates on four crucial aspects of the "Indian experience:" British impact of India; democracy; ethnic conflicts; and economic development. Comparisons with Pakistan will be repeatedly made. Students can also write papers on Pakistan.

Materials on India will be presented and analyzed comparatively and theoretically. Reference will regularly be made to theories of colonialism, democracy, ethnic conflict, and development. In short, this is a course on India/South Asia in a comparative perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary E Gallagher

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/481/001.nsf

This is a seminar that is designed to introduce students to the Honors Program in Political Science and the process of research design leading to the defense of a thesis prospectus. Students must be admitted to the program before enrolling in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 488. Political Dynamics.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; one prior course in political science is recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/488/001.nsf

Will a single presidential candidate emerge from the primaries or will we have a brokered convention? Do arms races lead to war? Why do popular movements get started, grow, and then often subside without accomplishing their goals? Is the earth growing warmer and what should be done about it politically? Questions of this kind are not easily answered with unaided intuition. Social systems grow organically, and their parts interact in different ways at different times.

Feedback loops cause many reforms to have the opposite of the intended effect. The purpose of this course is to bring systems thinking to bear on political dynamics. A few simple but powerful mathematical ideas will be taught and applied to a variety of political issues. Students will learn to experiment with dynamics and forecasting on personal computers, using primarily graphical methods. The course is meant to be experimental and applied rather than theoretical. A prerequisite of one prior course in political science is suggested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): John Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a member of the Department of Political Science faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 Democratic Citizenship.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 002 Power, Obligation, Resistance.

Instructor(s): Jennifer F Kirkpatrick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/495/001.nsf

This course is an examination of the limits of legal and political obligation and the legitimacy of political resistance. It investigates central issues of political theory and builds on an introductory knowledge of theoretical methods and concepts. Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? Are there circumstances or ways of resisting that make some acts more legitimate than others? How do we judge legitimacy or, alternatively, is this the wrong sort of question to be asking altogether? These questions are explored through readings in the social contract tradition, analytical theory, anarchist thought, and liberal theory. The course also examines historical and contemporary acts of resistance. Assignments and discussions focus on elucidating theoretical concepts from assigned texts and contrasting different schools of thought on the characteristics and extent of obligation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 003 Constitutional Interpretation.

Instructor(s): John Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Constitution consists of a mere 5000 words but is asked to settle over five billion problems, ranging over an awesome diversity of areas. A document that is no more than a dozen or so pages is asked to provide answers to questions about school prayer, abortion, affirmative action, gay marriage, interstate commerce, the right of terrorists to free speech, and the meaning of freedom of contract (and that's just for starters). How do we know what the Constitution has to "say" about any of these things and how the problems that arise within them should be decided?

This course begins to examine the relevant exegetical methods and political philosophies that attend constitutional interpretation. This course does not expect to give you firm answers but to provide you with the tools for deriving answers of your own.

There are some qualifications that students should consider:

  • First, the course materials focus heavily on Supreme Court opinions, which many if not most undergraduates regard as presenting an uncommon level of difficulty in comprehension.
  • Second, this is a very demanding course and any student who is unable or unwilling to attend every class meeting AND to be fully prepared to discuss the daily assignments with utmost care has no reason to enroll in this course.
  • Third, each class meeting will be conducted through the "Socratic method" and therefore the instructor will randomly call students for each class meeting to recite the facts, issues, and holdings for all of the relevant cases for that day as well as to engage the instructor in conversation and argument during class.
  • Fourth, this course may be enrolled ONLY WITH THE PERMISSION of the instructor. Interested students are thus required to bring the following items to the first class meeting: official transcript, writing sample and the name of one faculty member or graduate student instructor in the political science department who can serve as a reference.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 001 Television and American Politics.

Instructor(s): Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of the seminar is to cast a cool eye on claims made about television's impact on American political life. We will consider ways, some good, some not so good, that television influences politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 002 Community-Based Research: Detroit.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students in this course will work with the professor to develop and execute research projects that investigate public issues in urban settings. Readings will be assigned that are appropriate to the specific projects, including readings on research practice. The projects may be individual or small-group efforts. The final products may be written reports, documentary videos, websites, or in other formats. In many instances, students will collaborate with a community-based organization, civic group, non profit agency, neighborhood association, or similar group in all phases of the research. An objective of the research will be to guide specific action that addresses the topic being investigated. The course will require of students a significant amount of initiative, assertiveness, creativity, and energy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 003 Environmental Risk and Legal Institutions.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will consider the role of law and legal institutions in the management of risk from industrial chemicals. Regulatory decision-making in this arena takes place within an emotionally and politically charged environment one in which both risk to human life and the, at times, very high economic costs of eliminating this risk stand in the balance. The course will examine a diverse set of regulatory responses to this policy dilemma across different historical periods and national settings. Among the issues to be discussed: scientific, precautionary, and economic justifications for regulatory interventions; private versus public law approaches to environmental problems; the promise and limits of economic and informal institutional alternatives to legal regulatory instruments; environmental litigation and citizen participation; and the link between alternative legal norms and regulatory practices and socio-economic inequalities in the distribution of environmental burdens.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 004 Theories of Diversity.

Instructor(s): Page

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 005 Foreign Perspectives On American Politics.

Instructor(s): Stephen R Brooks

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the earliest years of European colonization in what would become the United States, foreigners have read various meanings into the American experience. America and the American experience constitute one of the defining poles of modern history, a fact that is attested to by the enormous volume of writings on American politics and society by foreigners.

This course will examine foreign perspectives, past and present, on several important features of American political life. These include race relations, wealth and class, political culture, and America's role in the world. We will cover some of the classic writings by foreigners on these themes, including those of Tocqueville, Bryce, Laski, Myrdal, and Beauvoir. The second half of the course will be devoted to more contemporary foreign perspectives on American politics, based on writings and other media from Britain, Canada, France, other European societies and the Middle East.

Students will be required to write a 20-page paper related to one of the themes of this course. Weekly participation is an essential component of the course, worth 25% of the grade. There will be about 30-40 pages of reading per week.

For more information contact Professor Stephen Brooks at brooks3@uwindsor.ca.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 006 American Political Development.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/496/006.nsf

The course has two goals. First, it will examine this transformation of southern politics. In doing so, it will explore both how national politics affected the South, and, in turn, how southern politics continues to shape national politics, including U.S. social policy, race relations, and the partisan control of Congress and the presidency. Second, the course will use this investigation to grapple with larger questions that preoccupy students of comparative politics, including: How do various social identities become politically salient in ethnically and racially diverse societies? What sustains authoritarian regimes, and when are insurgents able to challenge them effectively and build democracies? What special challenges do ethnically and racially plural societies face when democratizing? How do issues such as retrospective justice and the politics of symbols complicate, or facilitate, democracy-building?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 001 Government and Politics of the Korean Peninsula.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/497/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 002 Civil/Military Relations in China.

Instructor(s): Ellis Joffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topic of this undergraduate seminar will be Civil/Military Relations in China after the establishment of the communist regime in 1949. It will be divided into two parts. The first part, which will take up most of the seminar, will be a combination of lectures and discussions based on readings. It will survey and analyze the evolution of civil-military relations in China against the background of Chinese politics. The survey will be chronological and will be divided into sub-periods that will highlight the major shifts in the political role of the military and their relations with the party leadership. In the second part, the participants will present an introduction to their papers and a brief outline of its contents. Requirement: seminar paper and participation in the discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 001 International Human Rights Law.

Instructor(s): Eleni Eleftheriou

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/498/001.nsf

The central focus of this course will be the relationship between international human rights law and state sovereignty. We will explore the dynamics of this relationship and how international human rights law has developed since the Nuremburg trials. Significant attention will be given to the controversy over the newly established international criminal court, and how the scope of this court differs from the ad hoc criminal tribunals. Students will be required to write 20-25 page research paper on a topic relevant to the course.

Prior course in World Politics required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Van Houweling

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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