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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 11:50 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shelly Gail-Zeff Schreier (schreier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/111/001.nsf

An introduction to psychology as a broad survey class which explores the various theoretical bases for the understanding of human behavior. Students will learn about the biological processes of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory as well examine the theories of personality, psychopathology, cognitive and social development. Practical applications and contemporary topics will also be explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sharon Veinott (veinott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/111/030.nsf

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of psychology. As a discipline, Psychology is concerned with questions that make up the very fabric of our existence. From the mundane (e.g., Why can't I remember the names of people I meet?) to the profound (e.g., How do we know what behavior is "normal"?). There are three major goals for the course: (1) Introduce you to the ways that psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior. One of the main themes of the course is that different kinds of psychologists (e.g., biological, cognitive, social, clinical, etc.) approach psychology from different, but complementary, perspectives. (2) Introduce you to the body of knowledge, research findings, and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) Stimulate you to think about how the material we cover in class applies to your daily life. Psychology offers a unique perspective on many of the questions and social issues that confront us. There are no prerequisites for this course and it consists of two lectures and one discussion section a week. Grades are based on scores from three exams, four short written assignments, and performance in weekly discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 060.

Instructor(s): James H Hoeffner (jhoeff @umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/111/060.nsf

The purpose of this course is to provide a broad introduction to the field of psychology. Psychologists try to understand human behavior using a wide variety of methods and approaches. The primary goals of this course are to introduce you to the ways that psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior, and to introduce the major research findings and theories in the field. The topics we will cover include memory, language, development, learning, intelligence, personality and social psychology. There are no prerequisites for this course and it consists of two lectures and one discussion section each week. Grades are based on exams, written assignments, and performance in weekly discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marita Rosch Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychology covers a tremendous variety of topics and that the approaches to studying these topics are equally numerous. In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics: Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely on a biological level (the brain, evolution and the biological basis of behavior, behavioral genetics), a "basic processes" level (exploring research on perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), on a level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally on a "social" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and intergroup processes.)

In Part 3, we will look at one specific problem, namely the student's transition from high school to college, and how this problem can be approached on a biological level (stress and infectious diseases), on a basic process level, on a level of looking at one person (the personality characteristics that might make an adjustment to a transition easier) and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to transitions in our life?).

Required text: Gleitman H., Fridlund, AJ & Reisberg D. Psychology. W.W. Norton Company. A course pack will also be available from Ulrich's

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Wilbert J McKeachie (billmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Psychology 114 surveys the field of psychology including such topics as biopsychology, cognition, motivation, personality, social psychology, developmental psychology, psychopathology, and research methods used by psychologists to gain a better understanding of human behavior and experience. The course requirements include (in addition to understanding a textbook) participation in class discussion, keeping a weekly journal of reading and observations, and carrying out a research project with other students. There will be occasional quizzes, a midterm, and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Literacy and Illiteracy in America.

Instructor(s): Frederick J Morrison (fjmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For almost two decades concerns have been raised in the scientific and popular literature about the inadequate levels of literacy being attained by significant numbers of American children and adults. The impact of poor literacy on the social, economic and personal lives of Americans is significant and pervasive. In the search for the causes and cures of America's literacy problems, primary emphasis has been placed almost exclusively on the schools and the process of schooling itself. Yet accumulating evidence over the past 10 years paints a very different picture of the nature, origins and sources of America's literacy problems. This course will examine the complex roots of literacy including an examination of early parenting, schooling and broader sociocultural influences shaping growth of literacy skills. The focus of the course will be on identifying the major causes of our current literacy problems and suggesting concrete ways to improve literacy in America today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 The Psychology and Culture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Motherhood.

Instructor(s): Ann M Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/120/002.nsf

This course will explore psychological issues surrounding women's transition to motherhood. Cultural attitudes towards pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and related topics will be contrasted. In addition, the impact of technology on fertility and pregnancy will be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 The Development of Adolescent Girls.

Instructor(s): Ann M Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on the transition from girl to woman. Adolescent female development follows many paths, and this course will negotiate those potential avenues. Specifically, discussion will include, puberty, sexual socialization, body image career choice, and interpersonal relationships. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of popular media on sexual socialization and body image.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 004 I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race and Racism.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 Asian American Experience: Social Justice Perspective.

Instructor(s): Dan Pak (dpak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is an interdisciplinary course that explores contemporary experiences of Asian Pacific Americans in the United States from a social justice perspective. It examines the unique contributions and struggles of Asian Pacific Americans for social justice in multiethnic and multicultural society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 Racism Underground: Hidden and Not-So-Hidden Prejudice in America.

Instructor(s): Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Public opinion surveys suggest that prejudice and racism have declined dramatically since the 1940s. Has racism really declined, or simply gone underground? In this seminar, we will learn about such "hidden" or covert forms of prejudice, as well as some not-so-hidden, more overt forms of prejudice. The seminar will focus primarily on Black-white intergroup relations, but issues involving other ethnic groups (e.g., Asian-Americans, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, Latino/a Americans) and people of different sexual orientations will be included as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS COURSE MUST FILL OUT A PLACEMENT FORM AT WWW.UMICH.EDU/~IGRC (IN ADDITION TO REGULAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURES). DUE TO HIGH DEMAND, STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE MASS MEETING ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS WILL BE WITHDRAWN FROM THE COURSE.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Project Outreach.

[2 credits]. Students may only elect Project Outreach for 1 credit if they have completed the same section of the course in a previous term.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected though PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions. The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Psychology Undergraduate office in 1343 East Hall to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Winter 2003 Term. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 - Working with Preschool Children: Students will work at a placement with infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children. The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. This course will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture.

Section 002 - Big Sibs: Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood.

Section 003 - Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice: Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 - Health, Illness, and Society: Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 - Exploring Careers: Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes; and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 230(330). Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Edward Fantegrossi (billfan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/230/001.nsf

Biopsychology mingles Comparative Psychology (animal behavior & evolutionary psychology) with Physiological Psychology (behavioral neuroscience) to create a field of study dedicated to understanding the relationship between brain and behavior, and how both have been shaped by evolution. The overall theme of this course is that physiological processes within the central nervous system influence us psychologically and behaviorally, and during the semester we will endeavor to explore the brain structures and neural functions that mediate these processes. Specific attention will be paid to neurophysiology, sensation and perception, neuropharmacology, biological rhythms, learning and memory, emotion, language, the biological basis of psychological disorders, and more.

This 4-credit course will address a wide variety of topics in order to present a broad survey of the past, present, and future of Biopsychology to students who have already completed an introductory psychology course. A basic familiarity with biology and chemistry will be quite helpful, but is not a prerequisite for this course. Students will be evaluated by 4 discrete, non-cumulative exams, as well as quizzes and paper assignments in discussion sections. Class will meet in large lecture sections for 3 hours per week, and in small discussion/lab sections for 1 hour per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 232 / UC 262 / BIOLOGY 262. Evolutionary Biology and Human Disease.

Section 001 High school Biology including basic knowledge of genetics recommended.

Instructor(s): Vaughn S Cooper (vcooper@umich.edu), Alan Weder (aweder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/courses/darmed/links.htm

See University Courses 262.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 240(340). Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001 Evening Exams: Monday, February 10, 2003, and Monday, March 17, 2003, 6:00-8:00pm.

Instructor(s): Shane Thomas Mueller (smueller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/240/001.nsf

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues.

Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a textbook (R. J. Sternberg, Cognitive Psychology, 3rd Edition, Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace, 2003) and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 250(350). Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie J Rowley (srowley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/250/001.nsf

This course provides an introduction to the milestones of human development from conception to death. We describe physical, cognitive, and social growth of normal children with special attention to various cultural contexts of development and the rich diversity of individuals. The content is primarily drawn from research and theories in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. In addition, we will discuss implications for child-rearing, education, and social policy-making so that you can apply the knowledge to meaningful problems. Students will write one major paper and take four in-class exams. Students will attend two lectures and one discussion section per week.

Textbook: Development Through the Lifespan (2ed) by Laura Berk.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 260(360). Introduction to Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth E Wierba (wierba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/260/001.nsf

How do individuals relate to an organization? How do our personal qualities affect the way we feel about work and our performance? Do certain individuals play a greater role in shaping the direction of an organization than others? How are teams different from individuals? How do structural features of an organization affect individual feelings, performance, and the success of the organization as a whole?

These are a few of the questions we will explore in Introduction to Organizational Psychology. The goal of this course is to examine individual, group and organizational processes in light of theory and research on organizations. Learning how organizations function and the dynamics within them will help you to better assess the places you work, socialize in and offer voluntary service. It can help you to become a sophisticated and productive member of these organizations by understanding the challenges involved in managing others and being managed.

The course is structured so that learning will take place on three levels: Through meetings of the class as whole, in small teams carrying out course-related projects, and in individual reading, study and analysis. Instruction will be delivered by lectures, discussion and experiential exercises. Evaluation will be based on exams, as well as group and individual assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 270(370). Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberlyn Leary (kimleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/270/001.nsf

Where do we draw a line between the stress and tension of everyday life and the distress and dysfunction clinicians refer to as "mental illness?" What might the study of those whose functioning is deemed "abnormal" help us to understand about the roots of psychological health and the maintenance of well-being? This course will provide an overview of the field of psychopathology. We will cover a range of clinical diagnoses including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, personality disorders, and the psychoses. Our emphasis will be on theoretical and empirical models of psychopathological conditions as they relate to the definition, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. The course will focus on diagnostic classification as well as the behavioral and biological aspects of the major forms of psychopathology recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM). Additionally, we will also direct our attention to issues of public mental health (e.g., war and terrorism on stress and coping). We also will consider contemporary treatments for several of the psychopathologies.

Students will be evaluated on the basis of in-class examinations, section assignments (including several short papers), and class participation. Students will attend weekly lectures and section meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 270(370). Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Joseph P Gone (jgone@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/270/020.nsf

This survey course will introduce students to key issues in the contemporary scientific investigation of mental illness or psychopathology. Topics reviewed will include: efforts to systematically describe and understand psychological distress; the challenge of developing a useful system for classifying kinds of psychopathology; the process of empirical validation of purported disorders; and the problem of conceptualizing psychological distress across cultures. In addition, students will become familiar with the role and significance of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, including several prevalent DSM disorders and their diagnostic criteria. This course will consist primarily of lectures that elucidate and extend material treated in the textbook. Student evaluation will consist of assigned papers, quizzes, and exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 280(380). Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001 Evening Exams 6-8 PM. THU, FEB 6 & MAR 13; MON, APR 14, 2003.

Instructor(s): Samuel Ross Sommers (ssommers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/280/001.nsf

Social psychology is the scientific study of the way people think, feel, and behave in social situations. It involves understanding how we influence, and are influenced by, other people and the social contexts around us. A primary goal of this course is to introduce you to the perspectives, research methods, and seminal findings of social psychology. Equally important is the goal of allowing you to cultivate your skills for analyzing the social situations and events that you encounter in your everyday lives. Finally, throughout the course, emphasis will also be placed on developing critical ways of thinking about social psychological theory and research. Grades will be based on three exams, two papers, and regular participation in GSI-led discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 290(390). Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lilia M Cortina (lilia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/290/001.nsf

This course offers a general overview of personality theories and their application to modern problems and research. Examples of some of the topics covered are: personality assessment; interactionist approaches to personality; personality development; personality, gender, and culture; personality, stress, and health; and therapeutic applications of personality theory.

Students will be required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, read approximately one chapter from the textbook and one article from the reader per week, complete several short and one longer writing assignment, and take three equally-weighted midterm exams. Each exam will cover lectures, assigned readings, and material reviewed in discussion sections for the prior 4-week period. Format for the exams will be a combination of multiple-choice and short-essay questions. Exams will be given during class time.

Required Textbook:

  • Friedman, H.S. and Schustack, M.W. (1999). Personality: Classic Theories and Modern Research. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Required Reader:

  • Friedman, H.S. and Schusctack, M.W. (2001). Readings in Personality: Classic Theories and Modern Research. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 302. Special Problems Lab in Psychology/Natural Science.

Section 001 Computational Approaches to Biopsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Jeffrey J Hutsler (hutsler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230 or 240. Permission of instructor required. (3-4). (Excl). (BS). May be used as a lab in the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration with advisor approval. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/302/001.nsf

This course explores the role of computers in biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience research through the hands-on use of computer methodologies, computer modeling, and simulations. The course is composed of several modules and begins with simple simulations of common biopsychology lab methods (e.g., behavior conditioning and discriminate learning). The emphasis of the course then turns to research areas within psychology where computers play a large role in the data collection/generation process (e.g., connectionist modeling and behavioral testing). Students are required to write several lab reports and to present a final project they have designed and implemented under the supervision of the course instructor. Grading will be based upon lab reports, class participation, papers, and several short quizzes. The goals of the course are threefold:

  1. to instruct students on the importance of computers and computation in biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience research;
  2. to teach the scientific process in psychology including study creation, implementation, analysis and presentation; and
  3. to provide students with hands on experiences that seek to broaden their understanding of the importance of computational approaches and tools in research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 Practicum in Child Development and Child Care at Pound House. [2-4 credits].

Instructor(s): Brenda L Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 250. This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as write papers integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. For more information, contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House, 998-8399, cwtyson@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Contact Carolyn Tyson at 998-8399 for application info.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 002 Tutoring Reading in Schools. [2-4 credits].

Instructor(s): Scott G Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools. We pair college students with elementary school students in order to help students develop appropriate academic skills strategies. The course will help children become more successful and motivated in school. University students will gain knowledge about children and elementary schools. College students are expected to participate in mentoring for 3 hours per credit hour received per week. This means about 6 hours of tutoring for 2 credits. Students will read some background information and write a 5 page paper. Students will meet Wednesdays from 4:00-5:00 pm to discuss relevant issues. Students must have Junior standing, a car, open time blocks between 9:00-3:00 on several days of the week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 003 Michigan Mentorship Program. [3-4 Credits].

Instructor(s): Ellen J Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Admission is by application and interview. Contact equart@umich.edu for registration information.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In the Community Setting, II. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Division of Substance Abuse (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/umarc/splash.html) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide a continuing opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c)a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, PSYCH 211, and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

A course pack will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Section 001 Working with Children at U-M Children's Center. [3-4 credits].

Instructor(s): Karey Leach Fugenschuh (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (3-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 7 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/307/001.nsf

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with children ages 18 months through kindergarten in the UM Children's Centers laboratory preschool programs on campus. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations). This practicum meets laboratory requirements. A lecture relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held bi-weekly. A course pack (under $30) accompanies the lectures, along with several brief written assignments. There is a meeting between the Head Teacher and student at midterm and final designed to guide and reflect the classroom experience and the students growth and development in their interactions with children.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. For registration information call 647-6647 or email jamilaj@umich.edu.

PSYCH 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria L Slowiaczek (mls@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (2-3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/ugo/page.asp?id=32

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising. Students are selected through an application and interview process. Applications are available in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall.

Students are required to work 3-4 hours as peer advisors in the Undergraduate Office, as well as to attend a weekly, two hour class on Wednesdays from 4:00-6:00. A required training in peer facilitation and the psychology concentration is scheduled on the first two sundays after classes begin.

Other requirements include weekly readings, reaction papers, accountability logs of peer advising work and a final project. In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The course is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. APPLICATIONS CAN BE OBTAINED IN THE PEER ADVISING OFFICE, 1343 EH WEEKDAYS 11AM-4 PM, OR CALL 647-3711. APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY MON, NOV 18.

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/310/001.nsf

This course is designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; the nature of social oppression; facilitation of intergroup communication; conflict intervention skills; techniques of community building; and surveys of some contemporary intergroup topic areas (e.g., affirmative action, sexual assault, separation/self-segregation). Students who successfully complete this training may apply to act as peer facilitators for the course Psychology 122/Sociology 122, "Intergroup Dialogues." Recent trainees have facilitated dialogues with groups such as Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. For registration info go to www.umich.edu/~igrc or call 936-1875.

PSYCH 311 / SOC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/311/001.nsf

This practicum follows Psychology 310/Soc 320 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 316 / CAAS 331. The World of the Black Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie J Rowley (srowley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/316/001.nsf

See CAAS 331.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 317 / AMCULT 306. Community Based Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318. (3). (Excl). PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

This course will cover research methodologies useful in understanding communities. These include community needs and asset assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. Through readings, lectures, and discussion, the class will consider what is involved in each of these methods and when each is appropriate. Students will use one of these methodologies to carry out a research project in collaboration with a community organization in Detroit. Results from this project will be communicated through a paper and poster session. Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318.001 is required. Requirements include readings, lectures, a community profile, and a write-up of the research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 318 / AMCULT 307. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 001 Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 317. (1). (Excl). PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

This experiential lab involves one visit per week to an African-American, Arab-American, or Latino community organization in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well-being of children and families. Projects involve activities such as tutoring, art workshops, outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects. Students will conduct a community based research project at their internship organization.

Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Students must be enrolled concurrently in PSYCH 317: Community Based Research. This type of direct experience provides for a better understanding of course concepts, more in-depth learning, and a location to participate in a community research project.

This lab requires attendance at training sessions or community participation four hours each week. Students will turn in weekly attendance sheets that document their work. Transportation will be provided. An experiential journal, readings, and group project reflecting this experience will be completed for PSYCH 317.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 322(408). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. Permission of instructor required. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322 and 323. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits do not count toward the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for a maximum of 4 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 323(409). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be used toward the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 328. Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 322 or 422). (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 329. Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 323 or 423). (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary R Ten Eyck (teneyck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/331/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) It provides students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the biopsychology program with his/her on-going research. (2) It introduces students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior). (3) It provides practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists in laboratory research.

Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall). Students concentrating in 'Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences' will receive priority.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Applications for Psych 331 are available in 4029 EH and 1343 EH.

PSYCH 335. Introduction to Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary R Ten Eyck (teneyck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology or BIOLOGY 162. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/335/001.nsf

This course presents a broad introduction to animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology. The prerequisite for this course is an introductory course in Psychology or Biology and is well suited for any student interested in animal behavior, biological psychology, or the relationship between evolution and social behavior. Introductory lectures present the basic principles of organic evolution so that all students have the same knowledge foundation from which other course topics can be examined. Course topics include, among others, the relationship between genes and behavior, inclusive-fitness thinking and social interactions between close genetic relatives, the evolution of sex differences, mating systems and their ecological correlates, and sexual selection. Terms such as nepotism, altruism, aggression, and reproductive behavior are considered in light of how they have evolved by natural selection and how they contribute to daily survival and reproductive success. Examples from a wide variety of animal species are used to help emphasize various points. A lecture format is used, and students are encouraged to question and comment during class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Sections 001, 002, 003 ONLY satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Shane Mueller (smueller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/341/001.nsf

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research.

The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 346(443). Learning and Memory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Meyer (demeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers basic aspects of human memory, as well as advanced topics such as autobiographical memory, emotion and memory, repressed memory, eye-witness testimony, and the neuropsychology of memory. The focus will be on a combination of experimental laboratory research and everyday practical experience. Study of these topics will be pursued through reading of relevant books and journal articles. Class meetings will be devoted to lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and videos. Grades will be based on in-class performance, written exercises, quizzes, exams, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Sections 002, 003, 004 ONLY satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Jennifer T Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The course is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement.

Required text: Methods in Behavioral Research (7th edition) by Paul C. Cozby.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 353(453). Socialization of the Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lucretia M Ward

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/353/001.nsf

This course examines the social and personality development of children from infancy through adolescence. Over the course of the academic term we will discuss research findings describing several aspects of socialization, such as prosocial and antisocial behavior, gender role development, attachment, and academic achievement, and will examine key theories explaining their paths and outcomes. We also will examine the numerous forces that help shape and socialize children, including the family, peers, schools, and the media. Completion of PSYCH 250(350) is strongly recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 355(455). Cognitive Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/355/001.nsf

This upper level undergraduate course focuses on cognitive development and aging in adulthood. Theoretical perspectives, methodological issues, and empirical findings and their implications will be considered. We will discuss normal adulthood cognitive losses and gains, as well as the factors that contribute to individual differences in the patterns of change in sensation, attention, memory, communication, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, and wisdom. In addition, we will review current knowledge about pathological cognitive impairment in late life.

The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student discussion, but also will include videos, instructor lectures, group work, and student presentations. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 359(459). Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/359/001.nsf

Questions about aging are becoming increasingly important at both an individual and societal level. For example, as the number of years we can each expect to live increases, our life plans should be reconceptualized, and as the number and proportion of older adults in our population increases, our societal evaluation of peoples' needs and potential should be anticipated.

This course will examine current knowledge about constancies and changes in biology, behavior, and thought in adulthood. We will learn about typical adult aging patterns, explore the variability, causes, and plasticity of these patterns, and consider the individual and societal implications of them. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the usual and possible patterns of development and aging in adulthood. They should have new understanding of changes they are likely to experience as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain an understanding of the needs of older persons and of their potential value to society.

We will cover stereotypes, theory, research, and practices relevant to adulthood. We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S., including discussions of attitudes about the old, the demographics of past, present, and future older populations, and conceptual issues relevant to theory and research methods of development and aging. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be considered include physical capacities, health, health care, death and dying, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, wisdom, personality, self concept, emotions, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity in aging, as well as societal services, policies, and careers related to the old.

The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student discussion, but also will include videos, instructor lectures, group work, and student presentations. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/361/001.nsf

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed:

  1. to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience;
  2. to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and
  3. to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Sections 002-007 ONLY satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): James H Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/371/001.nsf

Psych 371 is an advanced exploration of the topic, methods, and controversies of abnormal psychology. Using a variety of sources, we will examine research questions and findings in the field and conceptual issues of contemporary importance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 Alcoholism & Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, I.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Psychology 371.010 (Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology) has openings for behavioral science field research focusing on urban Latino & African American youth. This ongoing course trains students in field research methods on substance abuse related projects.

Coursework is conducted in small groups. It involves fieldwork in communities and possibly Emergency Rooms of Detroit, supervision directly with faculty and discussion of relevant collateral reading. This is a 3-credit course that runs year round. Independent study is also available for less credits and hours.

Requirements: Junior or Senior status, significant experience in Latino and/or African American neighborhoods and a strong interest in learning about research in communities. Fluency in Spanish is desirable, but not required. A car is not required.

Candidates must be interviewed before they can register.

Interested applicants should contact:

Lucila Nerenberg, M.D., Research Investigator, Addiction Research Center Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, 400 E. Eisenhower Pkwy, Suite 2A Ann Arbor, MI 48108-3318

Tel: 734- 615-6060, ext 315 Fax: 734- 615-6085 email: nerenber@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. CALL 615-6060 FOR REG. INFO.

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/381/001.nsf

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. In the first half, students are introduced to different research methods and concepts and learn to analyze survey data they collect. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/381/002.nsf

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. In the first half, students are introduced to different research methods and concepts and learn to analyze survey data they collect. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Sections 001, 002 ONLY satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Robert Sellers (rsellers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 290. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/391/001.nsf

This lab course aims at making students familiar with the process of research in personality psychology. Groups of students will read the literature on one of several optional topics in personality research formulate hypotheses, collect data, analyze these data using statistical methods, write an APA style research report, peer-review the research reports written by other students, and present their research in the form of a short talk in class. Students will be introduced to experimental, survey, and archival strategies of data collection and hypothesis testing, diverse instruments for the assessment of personality, and statistical approaches to analyzing data that involves measures of personality. Grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written research reports, and performance on a statistics test.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Mind-Body Connections in Health. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): J Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore connections between mind and body that impact or determine states of health and the healing process. The core topics will include: empathy and the patient-physician relationship; psychoneuroimmunology (that is, the study of interactions between behavior, the brain, and the immune system); the placebo response; and mood disorders. Other topics will be determined by the interests of the students. Grades will be based on class participation, short written assignments on the core topics, and an individual topic paper on the student's area of interest. Each student will choose a class reading for their topic and be responsible for presenting and leading group discussion.

Required Texts:

  • Jamison, Kay Redfield (1995). An Unquiet Mind. New York:
  • Manning, Martha (1994). Undercurrents. New York: Harper Collins.
  • Sapolsky, Robert M.(1998). Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. New York:Freeman.
  • Tolstoy, Leo (1981). The Death of Ivan Ilyich. New York: Random House.
  • Whybrow, Peter (1998). A Mood Apart. New York: Harper Perennial.
  • Course pack at Excel

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Psychological Aspects of Conflict Escalation, War, and Peace. [3 Credits]. Meets with Honors 250.002.

Instructor(s): David G Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/401/002.nsf

In 1933, Albert Einstein (who revolutionized modern physics) and Sigmund Freud (who revolutionized modern psychology) exchanged letters on the topic, "Why War?" People have asked this question since the beginning of recorded history. To judge by the record of the twentieth century, as well as recent events, we still do not have fully satisfying answers.

Many academic disciplines have contributed to our understanding of why wars happen: for example, history, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, sociology, and biology. In this seminar, we will explore some of the special perspectives that psychology can offer to the study of war. For example: what is the "psychological meaning" or psychological significance of war? What motives drive countries, and people, thus to organize and attempt to kill each other? To what extent do wars result from mistakes of perception and misjudgments? And do our social relationships somehow drive us to war?

As we ponder these questions, we will read some classic theories and recent research studies of psychology and related fields. We will read fictionalized history, memoirs, and primary material such as diplomatic documents, as well as watching some movies. We will compare some crises (such as World War I and the 1990-91 Gulf Crisis) that escalated to war with others (such as the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962) that were peacefully resolved. All of this in an attempt to answer Einstein and Freud's question, "Why war?"

Students are encouraged to develop an individual or joint research project along the lines of their particular interests, previous knowledge, and experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Immigrant Psychology. [3 Credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.006 and RC Social Science 461.001.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Immigrants are unique in a sense that they are exposed to dual world views, cultural practices and beliefs. So far, the psychological treatment of immigrants focuses mostly on acculturation. Immigrant psychology is unique since it intersects with issues of race, class and gender. Rather than simply applying cultural psychology of a "home" culture to understand immigrants, we need to rethink cultural psychology in a way that is sensitive to the sociocultural context of immigrants' lives. Primarily, this course will strive to develop an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for immigrant psychology and apply that to study race, class and gender. The course will appeal to the fields of cultural psychology, sociology, women's studies and refugee studies. The course is designed to emphasize student in-class participation including small group discussions. The final grade is based on class a midterm (40%), quizzes (25%) and a research paper (35%). Attendance is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 004 Literature for Psychologists. [3 Credits]. Meets with COMPLIT. 384.001 and GERMAN 449.001.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 The Psychology of Ethnic Conflict; Poles, Jews, Ukrainians. Meets March 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26, 31, and April 2. [1 credit]. Meets with REES 410.001 & Judaic Studies 317.001. [Drop/Add deadline=March 14].

Instructor(s): John J Hartman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 410.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 Middle School Girls and Research: Theory and Practice. [3 Credits]. Meets with Women's Studies 483.003 and Ed 547.002.

Instructor(s): Pamela Trotman Reid (pamreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide the opportunity to discuss the role of gender, social class and ethnicity in early adolescent development and the relationships, aspirations, and attitudes that girls develop in school, family, and peer contexts. Theories of development will be considered and their application in a real setting will be examined. Issues of achievement, self-esteem and cognitive development will be covered as the class engages in mentoring activities with 7th graders in a Detroit-based Saturday school program. [An earlier version of the program may be viewed at http://www.umich.edu/~umgirls].

Students in the course will develop case studies, program evaluation reports, and pedagogical skills. Comfort with math and statistics are recommended since these will provide the basis for the interaction with the 7th graders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 007 Theoretical Foundations in Intergroup Relations. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/401/007.nsf

This introductory course will examine the history of various social identity groups in the United States (with a primary emphasis on race and ethnicity but also including gender, religion, socio-economic class and sexual orientation). This course will also examine the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). We will also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as class discussion. While there will be some lecture, this course will also bring in videos, activities/exercises, and guest speakers to explore these issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 008 Psychology of Asian Americans. [3 Credits]. Meets with AmCult 496.001.

Instructor(s): Phillip D Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/amcult/496/001.nsf

This course will provide a critical review and analysis of sociocultural influences that contribute to issues of personality, identity, and mental health status among Asian Americans. Some of the topics that will be examined in this Asian American context are:

  • Personality types and characteristics;
  • Communication styles and behaviors;
  • Interracial relations and conflicts;
  • Family dynamics, role hierarchies, and intergenerational stress;
  • Acculturation and ethnic identity;
  • Interracial marriages and mixed-race children;
  • Prejudice/discrimination; and
  • Psychological stress/trauma and health/mental health functioning.

Students will be graded using both exams and papers. The final number to be determined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 009 Advanced Intergroup Relations Capstone: Social Justice in the Real World. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Sharon D Vaughters (sdvaught@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A capstone course for students who have studied intergroup relations, that is, social power, privilege, prejudice and discrimination related to race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, ability, or other social identities. How will you continue the dialogue given your personal strengths, weaknesses, interests and values, the current economy and world events? This course will address these issues in relation to life after college, including one's personal and professional life and one's career choices. Students will work to reflect upon and integrate previous experiences in intergroup relations into goals and action plans for the future.

The course will include exploration of advanced theory of intergroup relations and dialogue and provide exposure to how people in the world maintain this work after initial training. Topics will include: advanced theoretical discussions/inquiries; constructing a personal vision/action plan; panels of former intergroup relations students; examining world leaders/figures doing intergroup relations work; exploring multiple identities; examining relevant intergroup relations research; creating community social justice action plans; and integrating career theory and planning with social justice work.

Requirements for the course will include active participation, two integration papers examining the interplay of career knowledge and social justice work, and the construction of a personal vision/action plan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Complexity and Emergence. Meets for 8 weeks, January 16 through March 6, 2003. [2 credits]. Meets with HONORS 493.001 and Psych 808.003. [Drop/Add deadline=January 29].

Instructor(s): John H Holland (jholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See College Honors 493.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 011 Strategies for Effective Learning.

Instructor(s): Hagen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 012 Psychology of Human Interaction. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Brian Malley (bmalley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/401/012.nsf

Even the most casual of everyday human interactions is remarkably complex, structured and motivated by powerful and sophisticated cognitive processes. This course shows how theories from evolutionary, cognitive, social, and cultural psychology illuminate the nature and structure of human interactions. Major topics include language & symbolic communication, the social self, the formation of social categories, obedience, and conformity. Course requirements include readings, exams, quizzes, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 013.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 404. Field Practicum.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-5). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 5 credits.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 052 Social Psychology of Intergroup Relations.

Instructor(s): Patricia Y Gurin (pgurin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-5). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 5 credits.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/405/052.nsf

Psychology 405 (Social Psychology in Community Settings) presents theories and research on intergroup relations within residence hall communities. Students taking the course have been accepted in a staff position (or as an alternate) in the residence halls for the next academic year, and may register with an override only. Residence staff at Michigan are involved on a daily basis in the articulation and enforcement of community living standards. This course provides social science materials and opportunities for in-depth discussion on building supportive and stimulating multicultural communities in the residence halls. Psychology 405 uses readings, large group sessions, small group discussions, classroom exercises, and practical experience to enhance each student's ability to analyze approaches to building positive multicultural communities, differences and commonalities among cultural groups, foundations of justice and injustice, and young adult personal and social development

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 361 Mentoring, Gender & Technology. [3 Credits]. Meets with Women's Studies 483.

Instructor(s): Abigail J Stewart (abbystew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. (1-5). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 5 credits.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.smartgirl.org/

This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender and technology and adolescent girls' development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the smartgirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the smartgirl.org project. This course will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender). The class will meet Mondays, 3:00-5:00 p.m., in Lane Hall G275, with 6 additional online hours to be arranged. This course is taught on a credit/no credit basis. Students can register for either Psychology 405-361 or Women's Studies 485 (this section will meet the WS practice requirement, but not the WS special topics requirement).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Orli Klier Avi-Yonah, Melissa Rae Peet

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 412. Peer Counseling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria L Slowiaczek (mls@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/412/001.nsf

This course is designed to explore the basic principles, techniques and developmental issues involved in peer counseling. Readings and class discussion will help students become familiar with the history of counseling/psychotherapy, to learn about different modalities, and to become personally skilled in communication and relationship skills used in peer counseling.

The course format will include two lectures and a discussion section. Students will be responsible for attending the classes, participating in the discussion section and doing weekly readings from the course pack and textbook. There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and a midterm project. The project will be a 10-minute videotaped peer counseling session where the student will be able to demonstrate the counseling skills s/he has learned. In addition, the student will do a written critique of the videotaped session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

PSYCH 420(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a natural science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

PSYCH 421(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a social science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 422(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

PSYCH 423(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 424(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PSYCH 426), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the development of a natural science research plan of a student's own design with the Honors Advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 425(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PSYCH 427), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus in Senior Honors is implementation of your research design culminating in your final, acceptable thesis and poster preparation for our year-end poster session. (Previously summarized as Get thee to your tutor, Progress steadily, and Conclude well). The goal is a thesis that makes one justifiably proud, and enhanced grounded understanding of research methods. Early on, each student will present the scholarly background and specific research design of their study to the class, and we will sporadically return to brief design and implementation presentations by each student. Drafts of segments of ongoing work that can later be incorporated into the final thesis are to be submitted periodically.

Other class session topics will include: special current issues and models of research, e.g., meta-analyses, integration of quantitative and qualitative data, etc.; graduate/professional school or job decisions and application strategies; basics of statistical reasoning; and more. Our primary focus, again, will be the conduct and successful completion of your thesis and the enrichment of your research competence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 426(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 424 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 427(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 425 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 433. Biopsychology of Motivation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent C Berridge (berridge@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/433/001.nsf

This course will cover the biopsychology and brain mechanisms of affective and motivational processes in animals and humans. We will examine general motivational processes such as theories of motivation, the interaction of motivation with learning, and substrates of pleasure and reward versus pain and stress. We will also look at specific motivational systems such as hunger, sleep, sex, aggression, drug addiction, and their underlying brain circuitry. Students are expected to have taken a course in introductory biopsychology (e.g., through Psychology 230) or equivalent. Course grade will be determined on the basis of essay exams, papers, class presentation and discussion. The course will be taught as a mixture of instructor lecture, student-moderated topic presentations, lecture, and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 436. Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry E Robinson (ter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. BIOLOGY 162 and chemistry are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/436/001.nsf

This course provides a basic introduction to the neuropsychopharmacology of drug abuse and addiction, and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. Prerequisites include Psychology 230 (Introduction to Biopsychology) and an interest in biological approaches to the study of behavior. Introductory Biology and Chemistry are also recommended. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behavior, mood, cognition, and neuronal function are discussed, and material from studies with humans is integrated with basic studies on the neurobiological basis of drug action and drug abuse including detailed coverage of synaptic transmission and the distribution, regulation, and integration of brain neurotransmitter systems. The focus is on addictive or illicit drugs, and all the major classes are discussed, including: opiates (heroin, morphine, opium), sedative-hypnotics (alcohol, barbituates, chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline), hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA), and dissociative anaesthetics (PCP).

A lecture format is used, with required readings from a text. The course is intended primarily for juniors or seniors concentrating in biopsychology, biology, or the biomedical sciences (e.g., pre-med).

Required Text: R.S. Feldman, J.S. Meyer and L.F. Quenzer, Principles of Neuropsychopharmacology, Sinauer, 1997.

Exams and Grading: The course grade will be based on the outcome of three multiple choice/short answer type exams. The first exam will be on Feb. 1 and will cover material presented up to that time. The first exam will be worth 30% of the final grade. The second exam will be on Mar. 14 and will cover material presented since the first exam. The second exam will be worth 35% of the final grade. The final exam also will be worth 35% of the final grade and will cover material presented since the second exam (i.e., it will not be cumulative). Grades will be based only on performance on the exams. There will be NO opportunity to re-take an exam or to write a paper to "improve" a grade. In past years the average grade in this course always has been B-.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 439 / ANTHRBIO 468 / WOMENSTD 468. Behavioral Biology of Women.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Boardman Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: ANTHRBIO 161, 361, 368, PSYCH 335, EEB 494. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/439/001.nsf

What does it mean to be a woman? This interdisciplinary seminar approaches this question by beginning with an even more fundamental one: What does it mean to be female? The course will introduce students to recent and innovative research on women in the fields of psychology, biology, and anthropology. The course integrates three approaches to understanding modern women. One approach compares human females with females in other animals, especially primates, within the framework of evolutionary theory (natural selection). Such comparisons help to illuminate the evolutionary origins of universal aspects of human female behavioral biology, including, for example, female sexuality and mate choice, child-bearing and child-rearing, and competition and cooperation among women. A second approach examines the physiology underlying critical events in women's lives, including menstruation, fertility, conception, pregnancy, birth, lactation, motherhood, and menopause and aging. A third approach compares women's lives in different societies, to examine cultural variation in women's behavior and social relationships. By synthesizing concepts and evidence from these three approaches, we will be in better position to address critical modern issues like: Why do men tend to hold more political and economic power than women? What is the relationship between male economic and political power and male control of female sexuality and reproduction? What factors influence birth rate in different human populations? How do sexuality and social relations change as women age? Under what conditions do women tend to form close, cooperative bonds with other women? What strategies are most likely to empower women in their struggle for self-determination? Students will be encouraged to consider the relevance of course information for their own lives (e.g., in relation to birth control, eating disorders and body imagery, male violence against women, female sexuality, mate choice, women's friendships, women's rights). Course requirements include a substantial amount of reading, including scientific journal articles available online and four books (Natalie Angier, Woman: an Intimate Geography, Sarah Hardy, Mother Nature: a History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection, Marjorie Shostak, Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, and Peter Ellison, On Fertile Ground: A Natural History of Human Reproduction). Grades will be based on participation in class discussion, weekly assignments related to the readings, two short essays, journal entries every other week on topics chosen by students, and a write-up of a life-history interview with an older woman of your choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/442/

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 40% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 60% of the grade). Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Readings

  • Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.
  • Hastorf, A. H. and Cantril, H."They saw a game: A case study." Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1954, 129-134. (CP)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5; Students who are waitlisted will be contacted by the professor individually if a space opens up.

PSYCH 448. Mathematical Psychology.

Section 001 Meets with Psych 721.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year of college mathematics and PSYCH 240. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/721/001.nsf

This advanced undergraduate course will examine several mathematical techniques in measuring and modeling of psychological processes. Topics to be covered this term will be: (1) Measurement Scales; (2) Signal Detection Theory; (3) Two-Person Game Theory. Students are assumed to have some basic mathematical skills (one year of calculus or equivalent is a must).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 457. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001 Language and Socialization. Meets with Anthro 458.002, Psych 551.244, Ling 492.005, Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek, Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 457. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Twila Z Tardif (twila@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/457/002.nsf

This seminar will introduce students to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons that have been made about Chinese and Chinese people in the Western psychological literature. It will include brief discussions of the structure of Chinese languages and cultures and how they differ from English and other European languages and cultures. It will then proceed to examine hypotheses about the psychological implications and effects of these cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons. Topics will include spoken language acquisition, literacy and learning to read and write, how language use shapes everyday perceptions, the concept of "learning," and the ways in which emotions are discussed and interpreted in everyday life. Students are expected to participate actively in the seminar and have some background in at least one of Chinese language, Chinese cultural studies, linguistics, philosophy of mind, or contemporary psychological methods and research.

Weekly discussions of the readings and issues, a formal presentation of at least one issue, and a final integrative paper presenting, critiquing, and suggesting new research in one of these areas will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 458(558). Psychology of Adolescence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tabbye M Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/458/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide an overview of "normative" adolescent development and the current state of research in this area. We will consider the theory and research that pertains both to what is experienced by "most" adolescents and to important individual differences in the experience of adolescence. Theory and research pertaining to normative processes will be considered from both a life-span and an ecological perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interaction between the individual and contexts which especially impact this developmental group (i.e., school, peer groups, neighborhood, family structures). A survey of some of the specific problems and contemporary issues facing adolescents will be presented within these contexts (e.g., teenage childbearing, substance abuse, eating disorders, delinquency and violence, school adjustment). Furthermore, the influences of cultures (broadly defined) on adolescent social development and the ways we study it will be interwoven throughout the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen A Epstein (kepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/464/001.nsf

The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). In addition, we will evaluate organizations' use of groups and teams through cases. My goals for the course are to enable every student to:

  1. understand and explain fundamental factors that lead to or hinder group effectiveness
  2. gain first-hand experience in team work by participating in a term-long learning team, reflect on the challenges and benefits of group work, and demonstrate skills for increasing group effectiveness
  3. become a more informed evaluator of organizations use of teams as a current or potential employee, manager, and owner.

We will work together to accomplish these objectives by the end of the course. Class sessions will be part lecture, part activities, and part discussion of readings assigned for that week.

Pre-requisite: Students are expected to have completed a course covering fundamental topics of organizational behavior, such as PSYCH 260(360).

Evaluation: Students are evaluated with two in-class exams, a term group project with peer evaluations, and participation in class discussion and activities.

Required Materials: Course pack of readings and cases, likely $50-$100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 467. Current Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001 Schools as Organizations.

Instructor(s): Tabbye M Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/467/001.nsf

In this course we will explore the impact that schools as organizations have on students, teachers, and other school personnel. We will pay particular attention to role that school organizational structures and characteristics pay in shaping life course development. We will also explore the ways in which school cultures influence the motivation and psychological well-being of its members. Under this topic, we will focus on the fit between the individual and the school, particularly for minority groups, women, and students from cultures that are different from the dominant ethnic/national culture at the institution. Finally, we will explore international differences in school organizational characteristics as one way to investigate the impact of schools as organizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 473(573). Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250 or 290, and PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 474. Introduction to Behavior Therapy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Randall Saul Roth (randyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will review the major theoretical models, assessment strategies, and treatment modalities of behavior therapy. The syllabus will initially introduce behavior modification within the context of traditional psychology and review its underlying assumptions. Basic principles of classical and operant conditioning and social learning theory will be described, and the respective paradigms will be extended to explain the mechanisms and remediation of childhood and adult psychopathology including marital and family dysfunction. Recent trends in behavior therapy, including the growth of cognitive schools of behavior change and the application of learning principles in the investigation and treatment of a wide variety of medical disorders, will follow. Finally, a critical evaluation of behavior therapy and relevant ethical concerns will be discussed. Student evaluation will be based on three examinations and a behavior modification project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 485 / WOMENSTD 485. Gender, Mentoring, and Technology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Abigail J Stewart (abbystew@umich.edu), Tiffany Vera Marra

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/womenstd/485/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 485.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 487. Current Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Thinking Across Cultures. Meets with Anthropology 458.005.

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 487. Current Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 002 The Social Psychology of Prejudice.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 498 / WOMENSTD 498. Gender and the Individual.

Section 001 Meets with WS 341.001.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examines how gender shapes and is shaped by individual women and men. We draw on psychological theories, feminist theories, and the empirical research literature to examine how gender operates for women and men. The course considers ways in which gender is constructed socially; examines particular domains in which gender is experienced and performed; and examines sources of gender in biology, lifespan development, and socialization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 001 Neuroendocrinology of Stress and Disease.

Instructor(s): Seema Bhatnagar (bhatnags@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/531/001.nsf

This course will explore neuroendocrine systems involved in the stress response, with particular focus on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We will discuss central systems that control the HPA response to stress and how early environmental events can change function in these central systems. We will also examine the changes in central systems that are produced by chronic exposure to stress and the consequences of these changes for physiology and behavior and the development of stress-related disease.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 532 / EEB 541 / PHYSIOL 541 / ANAT 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hylan Moises (moises@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/psych/532/001.nsf

See Physiology 541.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Graduate Course Listings for PSYCH.


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