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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in University Courses


This page was created at 11:54 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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UC 101 / NAVSCI 102. Seapower and Maritime Affairs.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey C Babos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Naval Science 102.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 103. Michigan Community Scholars Program: Academic Decision Making.

Section 001 – Leadership, Decisions, Community. 8-week class. Meets Jan 21-Mar 18. [Drop/Add deadline=February 3].

Instructor(s): Carly Michele Southworth (csouthwo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Michigan Community Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review the roles of leadership and decision making as they relate to their academic and professional careers. It will allow students to consider various frameworks of decision making and leadership through various theoretical perspectives and link them to civic responsibility and social change. It is hoped that students will develop a sense of application of one or more of these perspectives and consider how they might shape their own academic, professional, and community leadership careers. The issues and challenges of living and leading in a multicultural society will be examined. The class discussions will focus on relevant research, student perceptions, and university resources. This course is open only to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program. http://www.lsa.umich.edu/mcs/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 106. Perspectives on Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle H O'Grady (mmidwif@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program. (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/uc/106/001.nsf

This course will provide a broad examination of the cultural, political, personal, and socioeconomic dimensions of health, healthcare, and the health sciences. The course uses a topical format to explore the interfaces of these dimensions in mental health, acute and chronic illness, ethics, and emerging health science. This content will provide a foundation for professional involvement in health care and science by exposing students to the complexity of health and the spectrum of health professions. Practitioners from many disciplines within the health sciences will describe their work, challenges, and career paths.

UC106 is the core membership course for the Health Science Scholars Program and is open only to HSSP students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 – Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts: Literary Magic in North American Fiction.

Instructor(s): Lyall H Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A tradition as old as Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales flourished again in the middle of the 20th century in North America. Chaucer combined a number of tales, each quite satisfactory in itself, into a whole that made those individual pieces even more enjoyable – as though each gained in value by being gathered together. A similar achievement appears in such works as Jean Toomer's Cane (1923), Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time (1925), William Faulkner's Sound & Fury (1929), and Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House (1970). In each case, pieces of the book were originally published as separate, self-contained items. Writers often gather up pieces already published into a collection to be thus republished. Yet the books listed above have an extra quality that distinguishes them from those mere collections. These books "look" like collections – the pieces retain their "self-contained" appearance and each has its own title – but the books affect the reader as though they were novels. The value of the several pieces has been remarkable enhanced by the gathering together; the resultant whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Magic? Yes, literary magic or artistry – what athletic coaches mean by "team effort." That is what we will try to understand in this seminar. Meanwhile, it's all good reading: two of these writers are winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, another is the winner of two (Canadian) governor General's Awards for fiction, and Toomer is a real "sleeper."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 004 – Music in Our Lives.

Instructor(s): Louis B Nagel (julou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, harmony, etc. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 – Why Grandpa Went to War: The Psychology of Obedience & Drives Toward World War.

Instructor(s): Donald R Brown (donrobro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What were the social, economic, geopolitical, and personal psychological conditions in 1942 that would result in an 18-year-old freshman leaving college and going off to spend the next three years fighting with the U.S. Army in Europe and liberating Dachau? What led up to 1942 and how did these series of historical events become a part of the life of American youth and continue to affect that generation's (your grandparents) behavior after World War II and through today? What do we know from thirty years of research on the nature of obedience that resulted in both self-sacrifice and the Holocaust? These questions will be explored using the resources of historical works, novels, films, and personal documents. Each student will interview a member of that generation, preferably a grandparent or surrogate, with armed services experience during the war, and write a psycho-history of their subject's experiences and its consequences for their lives and times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 – Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities 1863-1954 and Beyond: An Historical and Legal Perspective.

Instructor(s): Warren G Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be placed on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered around one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 – Medicine & the Media from Hippocrates through ER.

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern, and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., St. Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of students' own beliefs about medicine in the 21st century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 004 – Lives of Urban Children & Youth: Schools, Community, Power.

Instructor(s): Stella L Raudenbush (stellarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lucyweb/

UC 151 is a service-learning course that integrates traditional coursework with personal reflection and community involvement. The goal of the course is to explore the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings. This course will help university students understand the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of young children and how community members, especially elders, help to create and support positive roles for young children within this community. Students will work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that help to shape social identity and social expectations within the community.

As a requirement for the course, students will complete five hours of service each week in the Detroit public school system to develop practical service-learning models. Assisting educators in implementing these developed programs will give students the opportunity to put into practice the theory of service-learning.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 – Contemporary Issues in Medicine Use and Pharmacy.

Instructor(s): Duane Kirking

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/uc/151/005.nsf

This seminar will evaluate key issues regarding medication use, such as drug development and regulation, economics and financing of medication benefits, and medication-taking behaviors. The role of the pharmacist in managing that use, including culturally competent care, will be addressed. Course readings will be selected from the clinical, professional and lay literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 – Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships.

Instructor(s): Allen Menlo (almenlo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to assist members toward an understanding of the personal and situational forces that help and hinder persons in their relationships with each other and in their efforts to work and live together. It will also assist members to transform these social psychological understandings into constructive actions for handling the problems and difficulties that inevitably arise when people are together. There will be opportunity to refine one's competencies at reflective listening, giving and seeking feedback, interpersonal observation, and mindfulness in thinking about issues. The class sessions are interactive and informal with brief information-giving, focused discussions, interpersonal learning exercises, and videotapes. Reading assignments are mainly through course handouts and other suggested sources. To stimulate personal reflection on interpersonal issues, class members maintain an observation log and a reading log and do a term paper on a relevant, self-selected topic. This work is also used as the source of evaluation and grading in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 007 – Psychology & Non-Ordinary Experience.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions.

It is only recently, however, that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. Lastly, we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

Students write a 1-2 page paper every week, and, during the last month of the course, students go off to explore their own topic of interest for a final, long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 154. First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar.

Section 001 – Environment, Sustainability, & Social Change. Meets with Environ 139.019.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/uc/154/001.nsf

See Environment 139.019.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 154. First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar.

Section 002 – The Human Body: Living Life Inside and Outside the Box.

Instructor(s): Alphonse Burdi (burdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Indeed this is the age of scientific discovery! With each passing day, knowledge in the life sciences is increasing exponentially in many areas, including stem cell biology, patterns of birth defects, and the phenomena of aging, dying and death. Important as it may be to human health, such new information also surfaces the complex issues of ethics and values that will be of special consideration in this seminar.

Biological Perspectives.

The plan of the human body can serve as a keystone as we probe the interplay of genes, cells, morphogenesis, and the environment in which we live. A myriad of biological advances could be considered, but three exciting topics especially jump out:

  1. birth defects and population patterns;
  2. the phenomena of ageing, dying, and death; and,
  3. the immensely provocative "stem cells."

This last topic alone opens up a world of biological concepts and principles that can influence our understanding of how the human body – your human body – is shaped prior to birth and throughout life. Thus, "…life inside< the box.

Ethical and Societal Perspectives.

However stimulating "…life inside the box" may be, that is not the whole story! In the excitement of so many dramatic scientific advances over the last ten years, efforts to understand the ethical implications have not kept pace. It is vital that researchers and clinicians be aware of and sensitive to the legal, cultural, and societal issues spawned by their work. What principles and policies should be in place to guide further research and application of such discoveries? Answering this question focuses our attention on those environmental events occuring outside biology laboratories and outside our own human bodies, i.e., "…life outside the box. "

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 202 / AERO 202. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power.

Instructor(s): John F Gaughan II (jgaughan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Aerospace Studies 202.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fran Zorn (franzorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in a health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 21st century: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs, and the effects on the uninsured (43 million plus people) and the underinsured. We discuss issues related to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films.

A course pack containing the syllabus and is required. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and writing assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor or a CSP counselor at CSP, G155 Angell, to receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Road, Ann Arbor (about a mile from campus; map available at CSP). Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term. Students who have conflicts with the Thursday evening meeting should not enroll in the class. This meeting is essential to the successful completion of the course, and the information is not available in a text book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor.

UC 212. Introduction to Global Change III: Studies of Global Sustainability.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Carmen Lemos (lemos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: UC 110 and 111. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange3/

Global Change III builds on the foundation laid by the first two courses in Global Change, through in-depth examination of four case studies integrating natural and human aspects inherent in Global Change issues. Students will integrate previously learned materials with new lecture material and discussions, and modern simulation tools. Faculty members specializing in the topic of each module will guide students' exploration of each case study. The product of this semester is the creation, by the students, of a short book containing a series of case studies of two countries in the topics of socio-political history, climate change, water resource issues, and public health and the complex relationship these areas have with Global Change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 250. Collegiate Seminars.

Section 001 – The Vitality of Socrates: Socrates Responds to Nietzsche.

Instructor(s): Paul W Sunstein (sunstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to any student who has completed the introductory composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

According to Nietzsche, "Plato is boring" and Socrates, although he intuited that morality is an illusion, introduced an intellectualized righteousness that corrupted the Athenian youth and paved the way for other worldly, ascetic Christian morality and the subsequent long history of the Western loss of its healthy, power instincts. This course investigates Socrates as he appears in the eyes of three contemporaries and considers the case for Socrates (and Plato) on vitalistic grounds. After selections from Nietzsche, we consider Aristophanes' The Clouds which, while presenting a lively portrait of Socrates, puts forward many of the allegations later made by Nietzsche, to which our subsequent authors respond.

We next consider Zenophon's Symposium, where Socrates appears as the ideal, good time party guest. According to the first attack of the culture wars, "Plato is boring" and Socrates' intellectualism overly tamed the youth of Athens and eventually the West as a whole. This course seeks an interesting and vital Plato, who, having anticipated Nietzsche's critique of morals, stands as the ideal educator of gifted youth. Readings consist of short selections from Nietzsche, Plato's Gorgias and half of The Republic, plus two ancient, comic studies of Socrates, Aristophanes' The Clouds and Zenophon's Symposium.

(Students must have satisfied Intro Comp requirement)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 262 / BIOLOGY 262 / PSYCH 232. Evolutionary Biology and Human Disease.

Section 001 – High school Biology including basic knowledge of genetics recommended.

Instructor(s): Vaughn S Cooper (vcooper@umich.edu), Alan Weder (aweder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be included in any biology or psychology concentration plans. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/courses/darmed/links.htm

Evolutionary biology is one of the foundations of the life sciences. As Theodosius Dobzhanzky said in 1973, "Nothing in biology makes sense, except in the light of evolution." This course will use the problems of medicine and public health as a focus and framework for teaching the principles of evolutionary biology. The application of evolutionary biology to the problems of medicine is a rapidly growing field that has been initiated, to a substantial degree, at the University of Michigan. This is the first undergraduate course on the topic.

This course will engage students in critical thinking about disease from a novel viewpoint that will force them to use, not just to memorize, the principles of evolutionary biology. These principles are a necessary foundation for understanding any of the life sciences, and the critical skills they will acquire will serve them well in any endeavor. There will be brief quizzes weekly, a midterm and a final exam, and a research paper to evaluate students. Students will provide regular feedback via GSIs and the web page during the term, and they will complete course evaluations at the end of the term.

BIOLOGY 262 cannot be used to satisfy any concentration requirements in Biology, General Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, and Plant Biology. The course also cannot be counted as credit for a Minor in Biology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

UC 270. University Courses Topics Mini-Course.

Section 001 – Becoming a Doctor. 5-week mini-course meets March 4-April 3. [Drop/Add deadline=March 10].

Instructor(s): Marilynn M Rosenthal (mmrosent@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Professions are the hallmark of modern society and the medical profession is a prototype of what is meant by a profession. This course will examine the nature and history of the American medical profession, how it developed and changed since the early 1800s. Some of the questions the course will address: What is the nature of the profession today? What social forces have shaped it? What does the future hold?

Weekly sessions will be a combination of discussion and interactive lectures. Lively and informative discussion very much depends on keeping up with the weekly assignments and willingness to participate through informed ideas and asking questions. Interactive lectures involve attending closely to the lectures and responding to questions and assertions posed throughout.

There will be two texts for this course, with one exam and a seminar project. The final exam will consist of one essay question and a number of short answer questions. The seminar will receive a study guide a week before the exam. The seminar project will be to produce a "Guide to Getting into Medical School." The class will have the opportunity to work in small groups to produce "A Guide to Getting into Medical School." This project will accomplish at least three goals: help you build your group participation skills, develop web skills, and increase your practical and current knowledge of medical schools. In addition, this project will introduce you to a wide range of information sources. Small groups will work together on individual chapters of the "Guide" and write the chapters together as well as individual papers. The groups can decide the topics of their chapters. Topics could include: How Medical Schools Differ; The Admissions Process; Trends in Medical Education; Patterns in Specialty Choice; Getting a Residency; Staying Balanced in Medical School; and many others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 – LAC section in Spanish: History of Latinos in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: permission of instructor.

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 004 – Must be concurrently enrolled in History 348.004: Latin America: The National Period.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Section 004 – Must be concurrently enrolled in History 348.004: Latin America: The National Period. Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 402 / MILSCI 402. Military Professionalism and Professional Ethics.

Instructor(s): Steven E Rienstra

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of MOEP chair. (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Military Science 402.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for UC.


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