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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 11:25 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy.

Creative Writing

Section 001 Creative-nonfiction..

Instructor(s): Leslie Anne Stainton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/242/001.nsf

Creative non-fiction is information-based writing for general audiences. Freelance writers, journalists, and technical writers typically write, translate, interpret, and/or edit texts that explain or describe specialized subjects in ordinary language that non-specialists can understand. These assignments can range from advertisements and news reports to feature articles aimed at more sophisticated readers in periodicals such as The New Yorker and Harper's. Even semi-specialized publications, such as Scientific American and Car and Driver, use non-technical language that informed amateurs as well as professionals can comprehend. For centuries, historical events and figures have inspired works of literature, from classics such as The Odyssey and Macbeth to contemporary works such as Norman Mailer's The Executioner's Song and Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children (a stage adaptation of which will premiere this semester at the University of Michigan). Countless films, Disney-animated features, and television dramas have been adapted from historical or literary sources. Biographies, autobiographies, translations, musical adaptations, and children's books often blend fantasy with fact.

All professions reward good communication skills. The ability to understand, synthesize, and communicate facts to others is as necessary to a doctor as it is to a writer. With this in mind, students should find "Creative Non-Fiction," which combines the challenges of research with the pleasures of self-expression, to be a valuable elective.

Students will complete either one long (25-30 page) project or three short papers (10-15 pages each) on a related theme. Two drafts will be required. Projects may include adaptations from one medium to another; non-fiction for children; personal essays, interviews, and/or oral history; autobiographical fiction, poetry, and/or drama; and picture books. NOTE: This class can be useful to juniors in anticipation of Honors Thesis work. Additional time requirements include weekly office conferences with instructor as well as supervised field research, participation in relevant campus seminars, and local cultural events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for Section 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 002 [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for Section 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal, and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar, and voice. This is not a mini-course!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Pursuit of a Legacy: Landmarks in Russo-Soviet Music and Ballet 1836 -1950.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Amie Schwartz-Bishir

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/251/001.nsf

Russia was far behind her neighbors at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Compared to Germany, France, and Italy, there was little if any concert music or ballet of Russian origin. Connoisseurship focused largely on Western European music and theatrical dance, and these foreign artistic traits were passed from one generation of servant-performers to the next. How, then, by the middle of the twentieth century did this country's status change from artistic spectator to influential player? Who were its pioneers, what were their achievements, and what is the canon that has become the Russo-Soviet legacy? What is it about the combination of dance and music that is significant to the artistic validity of the Russians?

To answer these questions, this course will examine concert music and ballet of the Russian and Soviet orbit from the Romantic era to the middle of the twentieth century. Stylistic features that mark pieces as distinctly Russian, or Soviet, will be examined. In addition to a broad survey of the pieces of this period, selected complete works of the canon will receive in-depth focus. Artists will be considered for their individual merits as well as for their historical, cultural, theoretical, and philosophical significance. Achievements of Russo-Soviet composers, and those numerous individuals who have contributed to ballet, will be contextualized in light of developments in Western European music and theatrical dance. The importance of music and ballet to the Russian people will be discussed. Ultimately, the accomplishments of the Russo-Soviet schools of music and ballet will be considered for their long-term impact at home and in the West.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brandon Jeremy Brack

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 255. Film Experience.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 The Film Experience: Self-Reflexive Cinema.

Instructor(s): Matthew Nicholas Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will introduce students to central concepts of film analysis-form, narrative, shot, editing, mise-en-scéne, spectatorship, visual pleasure, and the classical Hollywood style through close readings of the film theory of Laura Mulvey, David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Janet Staiger. These concepts will then be tested against approximately 7-10 American and European films, all of which focus on cinema as a highly complex and specific set of signifying practices. Through films such as Fritz Lang's M (1931), Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow Up (1966), and Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation (1974), we will examine how filmmakers have made the experience of viewing and listening central to the meaning of their works. In this way, the seminar will explore how filmmakers have probed issues having to do with the ways in which the experience of movies has changed how people perceive and understand their world. Students will be responsible for a 15-page research paper on a particular film.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 305. Cultural Confrontation in the Arts.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Minorities are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, internal colonization, and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture.

The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative texts or visual images that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation, and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, paintings, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own.

Guest speakers from a variety of academic departments in LS&A will give many of the lectures. The course focuses on minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans, and African-Americans), with a few lectures devoted to minorities in other areas of the world. Course objectives include: (1) to foster an awareness of the cultures of others by letting them speak in their own voices and by learning to listen carefully both to what is said and how it is said; (2) to understand that the responses of these cultures to the impact of the dominant culture have to be explored through questions of form and language, and that these questions are often related to the undermining of tradition and the crisis of cultural identity; (3) to help students refine their skills in verbal and textual analysis; and (4) to encourage students to reflect on how the issues of the course are played out in their own lives. This course will be offered for 3 credits, not 4

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 310 / MEMS 310. Medieval Sources of Modern Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid pictures of savagery, superstition, barbarians wearing horned helmets, and persistently inclement weather. This course will attempt to uncover more complex, less stereotyped perspectives on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts; we will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations; about the role of the intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue; and most importantly about the framing of a new history of origins and endings, a new narrative of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to discover their own history?

Works will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks (selections); Gildas, The Ruin of Britain (selections); Beowulf.

The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 312 / SLAVIC 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 318. Critical Approaches to Literature.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Postmodern Positions.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to postmodernism. It is intended for students who have encountered the term, but who feel uncertain about what it means; for students who have already worked with some of the concepts, but who would like a practical introduction to a selection of the seminal texts; and for students who are just curious.

We will ask such questions as: What is the relation between modernism and postmodernism? Are they diametrically opposed, or deeply implicated in one another? How did the "text" come to be so important - not only as a literary object, but as the definitive constituent of culture itself? What is the relation between "texts" (presumably composed of words or signs) and "history" (composed of events)? What is meant by the "deconstruction of the unified subject" or the "death of the author?" Finally, we will question the role of "theory" in postmodernism. Does theory always have the last word?

Students will be expected to read, absorb, and understand difficult postmodern texts. However, they will not be expected to take up the positions staked out in those texts as their own, if they would prefer not to. Opposition, or even resist-ance is encouraged; but it should be thoughtful and well-informed. So we will end by outlining a few arguments critical of postmodernism.

This is an interdisciplinary course involving literature, the visual arts,and critical theory.

Literary works will include: Dinesen, The Blank Page; Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Barthes, S/Z; Calvino, Invisible Cities; Genet, The Maids; Borges, Labyrinths. Visual material will include works by Cy Twombly, Jennifer Bartlett, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, and Cindy Sherman.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/325/004.nsf

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Introduction to World Performance. Meets with Theatre 212.001.

Instructor(s): Dieudonné-Christophe Mbala Nkanga

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to World Performance traditions based on non-Western societies. In this context World Performance is perceived as the process of artistic and social creation for display of human conflicts and identity, as well as the concept of cultural agency. It is intended to help undergraduate students gain knowledge and enhance their understanding of performance traditions and practice of theatre and drama around the world. Globally, this course is meant to complement Theatre 211 (Intro to Theatre and Drama) mainly dealing with Western Drama. Important issues to be examined will include:

  • nature of performance and conditions of occurrences in social and political contexts;
  • modes of performance (dramatism, everyday life...);
  • rituals and ritualistic drama (as artistic and sociocultural productions);
  • non-Western dramaturgy (use of social and cultural patterns) and the performance perspective;
  • the relationship between performer and the audience (the latter being the ingredient that completes the performance process).

This course will consist of two sections: Lecture by the instructor, and Discussions led by the Graduate Student Instructor (GSI). Assignments will include: reading of important selected materials, group workshop activities on assigned themes, bibliographical search of non-Western materials, and an essay. Participation in both lecture and discussion sessions is mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 003 Frames of Identity.

Instructor(s): Thomas Chauncy Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Leonardo da Vinci's aphorism "every painter paints himself" points to a profound assumption about the relationship between the artist and the work of art that the "self" of the artist is somehow figured or embodied in his or her work. This course will investigate the theory and practice of self-representation in Western art since the fifteenth century in the genres of self-portraiture and life-writing. We will attempt to understand the "self" as a variable historical concept, and we will treat self-portrayal as the deliberate construction of a persona out of the cultural materials of identity, such as character, social status, ethnicity or nationality, gender, and religious and political beliefs. One of our primary questions will focus on how such works address their beholders, that is, how a "self" is rhetorically conjured up in writing and depiction. Another will focus on how individual artists have articulated their identities in terms of shared craft values or conformity to artistic traditions. We will also consider how common beliefs about "the artist" as a social type (ranging from saintly craftsman to social outlaw to middle-class professional) have influenced both artists' ideas of themselves and our expectations as viewers and readers. Discussions will refer to a wide range of artists, including Benvenuto Cellini, Albrecht Dürer, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi, Rembrandt, Angelica Kauffman, Vincent Van Gogh, Max Beckman, Andy Warhol, Lorna Simpson and Yasumasa Morimura. Students in this course will have special opportunities to collaborate with students enrolled in Larry Cressman's "Introduction to Printmaking" (R.C. Arts 288), in which self-portraiture will be one of the major projects for the term. It is hoped that some students will consider the benefits of taking both courses. We will also work directly with an exhibition of about ten self-portraits, newly made by contemporary artists, that will be displayed Winter term in the R.C. art gallery. In addition, there will be at least one field trip to the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Writing assignments will include four short essays, as well as a term paper. The quality of writing is expected to be high and academic in style. Books to be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop will include Benvenuto Cellini, My Life; Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Confessions; Julian Bell, 500 Self-Portraits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 348(452) / RUSSIAN 348. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Russian Fiction and Drama in the late 19th Century.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 348.001.

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RCHUMS 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Steven Kirschenmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This music theory-composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the course will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some will already be composers. All are welcome. Twenty students will be accepted. Each student works at his/her own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony). The course meets for four class hours, and students should plan to spend a minimum of 10-12 hours per week preparing materials for the RC Humanities 350 class. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RC Humanities 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001 [1 or 2 credits].

Instructor(s): Mark Steven Kirschenmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 350. (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with RCHUMS 350; however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, sight-singing, use of ear-training tapes, and computer lab programs. The course will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Monday and Wednesday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab by permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 357. What Television Means: Research, Analysis, and Interpretation.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Social critic Raymond Williams reminds us that public forms of discourse/communication have evolved through a series of forms: repertory companies, commercial theatres, motion pictures, and television, for example. In each of these cases, he observes: "There has been a new sharing and integration of languages, at least of gesture and systems of signs. Moreover, these fresh inter-relationships are not merely available; in the course of their use and development, they are themselves transformative, and means of communication are transformed as they are employed." How does television shape our thinking? In this course, we will be researching and critiquing various genres of television discourse to apply relevant analytic tools to the content and to examine our own responses to the content in light of the cultural climate we inhabit. Much of what is said about television is inaccurate and superficial; we will examine what is on the screen and what experience, background, and point-of-view we bring to the text. Four papers on differing genres of text are required, as well as presentations to the class on individuals' research findings. Class discussion and screenings are regular required parts of the course each week. A long final paper is written on a topic agreed upon in individual conferences.This class may be used to satisfy the Jr./Sr. writing requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 375(475) / ASIAN 360 / PHIL 360 / HISTART 387. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/asian/360/001.nsf

See Asian Studies 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 381. Shakespeare on the Stage.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu), Barbara C Hodgdon

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course involves intensive study of Shakespeare's plays as performed events. Students will read, discuss, analyze and explore through actual performance outstanding scenes from six major plays, representing the various genres Shakespeare practiced, in order to discover how Shakespeare's drama communicates its meaning to an audience in a theater. Attention to the conventions and conditions of the Elizabethan stage, the shape of Shakespeare's career as a whole, and modern interpretations of the plays, including select cinematic versions, will supplement this activity. Centerpiece of the course will be the March residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company and its presentations of Coriolanus, and Merry Wives of Windsor. Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, and King Lear will also be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 002 Children Under Fire.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth N Goodenough (lizgoode@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suffering and remembering longest, children lose most in war. Recent memoirs by "hidden children" of the Holocaust, adolescent diaries from war zones, and oral histories of teenage victims of domestic and urban violence challenge the stereotypes of war stories. Examining the sense of lost childhood and fear of violence which pervades our society, this course explores the child's contest for a place in the world.

How have children been represented globally as refugees, victims of conflict, or survivors of trauma? In what ways do empire and frontier continue to influence narratives for the young? What roles do gender, classic war stories, national identity, family resilience, issues of guilt and innocence, cross-writing, amnesia and recovered memory, terrorism and expectations of a "happy ending" play in writing about children under fire? Authors include Salman Rushdie, Toni Morrison, Robert Coles, Hans Peter Richter, Christopher Paul Curtis, Zibby Oneal, Miriam Winter, LeAlan Jones, Virginia Walter and Paula Fox.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rchums/325/004.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 481. Play Production Seminar.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this intensive upper level drama course students will participate in the full process of research, script analysis and rehearsal on a major work of dramatic literature. Past Play Production courses have presented such work as Wedekind's Spring Awakening, Brecht's The Threepenny Opera and The Good Woman of Setzuan, Chekov's The Seagull, Ibsen's Peer Gynt, and Tony Kushner's Angels in America. Students will have the opportunity to do dramaturgical work on the period and place of the play, to collaboratively develop a conceptual frame for the work and evolve a production design to express it, and, most importantly, have the time to do thorough and detailed character and scene analysis. Admission to the class is through interview and/or audition. Students with an interest in directing and design are also encouraged to apply.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 482. Drama Interpretation II: Performance Workshop.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 280 and either RCHUMS 282 or playwriting. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this hands-on workshop, students will learn the essential elements involved in directing a theatre production. They will be assigned a series of exercises on staging and tableaux and will work in collaboration with designers to create production concepts. Through our work with actors from the Hums 485 "Acting Workshop", directors will have opportunities to explore script analysis, character work and improvisation. The course will challenge students to work with a wide range of dramatic material and there will be opportunities to present work through exercises, scenes and the final process on a one-act play.

Admission by interview only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Performance Art Workshop.

Instructor(s): Holly Hughes (Hahughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, RCHUMS 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/artdes/454/002.nsf

In this course, we'll investigate a variety of different techniques used to create solo and group performance art works. Writing, movement, visual exercises and other creative methods will be addressed as we develop works for public performance. Athough primarily a studio class, we will also be looking at the historical roots of this form as it has developed in the Western modernist tradition, as well as looking at the other cultural practices that have informed this work. For more information, contact Holly Hughes at Hahughes@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Medieval Drama Workshop. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a practical workshop in early drama in translation running parallel to Professor Theresa Tinkle's survey course in Medieval Drama (English 450). Selections from Professor Tinkle's syllabus will be realized in performance and presented to her class. They will include examples from Latin elegiac comedies, English Mystery and Morality plays, French and German farces. The workshop will also prepare the University of Michigan's entries in the International Early Theater Festival in Toronto, scheduled for mid-June, 2003. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, some acting experience/interest in early drama.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students. Permission of instructor required.

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 Actors Workshop. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this two credit course students will have a chance to work on a number of creative exercises and challenging scene assignments as an "in-house" acting company for directors from RC Hums 482, "Director and Text". Actors will have the opportunity to learn about the audition process from the director's perspective and to explore how to work on a diverse set of characters from a wide range of dramatic material. All acting students will participate in improvisations and staging exercises as well as experience intensive scene study and the sustained rehearsal process for a one-act play at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students. Permission of instructor required.

Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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