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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Social Science


This page was created at 11:26 AM on Thu, Feb 6, 2003.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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RCSSCI 220 / SOC 220. Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course explores human society from an interdisciplinary social scientific perspective anchored in political economic analysis. The primary focus in on modern capitalism, especially as it has developed in the United States. The contributions of a wide range of social analysis are examined with an emphasis on recent work. Historical and theoretical points are considered in close relation to current affairs and to potential feasible alternatives to prevailing social relations. Students are encouraged to explore their own interests and ideas about policies and institutions as well as to develop their capacities for social analysis. Written work consists of a take-home midterm, a final examination, and a term paper on some political economic topic. The course provides extensive opportunities for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 275(RCNSCI 275). Social Dynamics of Science, Technology, and Medicine.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright (spwright@umich.edu), Inigo Granzow-de La Cerda (inyigo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many of the world's most pressing problems require its citizens to resolve scientific and technical problems simultaneously with questions of political choice and social justice. Values, epistemological assumptions, and social forms are routinely embedded in artifacts and infrastructures. In turn, technological systems, engineered environments, advanced medical care, and scientific knowledge profoundly shape modern societies. This course introduces students to the social dynamics of science, technology, and medicine: the interplay among social, political, and ethical concerns, on the one hand, and new knowledge, new devices, and new medical techniques, on the other. The course is based on a few case studies, each of which we cover in depth. As we explore each one, we will discuss their scientific and technological bases, including the history and controversies surrounding what we may take for granted today. We will introduce theories of scientific knowledge and technological change. We will seek understanding of how science, technology, and medicine create unintended effects, and how societies cope with these consequences. In all cases, we will look at science, technology, and medicine, not only from the point of view of their practitioners, but from the perspective of users, observers, and victims as well.

Occasional guest lectures will supplement the instructors' own expertise. Films and novels are incorporated into the syllabus as examples of cultural reception and interpretation of technical issues. This class will serve as the core course for the proposed Minor in Science, Technology, & Society. Preference will be given to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, in that order.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 290. Social Science Basic Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed for students at the sophomore level or above who are seriously considering a Social Science concentration in the Residential College. The seminar is a requirement in the Social Science program; its purpose is to prepare students to pursue a concentration in Social Science in the RC.

Seminar sessions will introduce students to the RC Social Science faculty and upper-level Social Science concentrators, and discussion will center on how to turn general interests into problems that can be investigated systematically. Early on, students will begin working on their own with guidance from faculty and upper-level students whose interests complement theirs in order to complete the principal goal of the seminar: designing a coherent, individualized program of study for the Social Science concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 302. Contemporary Social and Cultural Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David E Pedersen (pedersen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Social Science 301 or equivalent (as determined by the instructor). (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Modernity and the Production of Knowledge in the Era of Globalization": this course will examine closely a selection of theories of knowledge, existence and social transformation produced by writers located in Anglo-European countries and also in parts of Latin America, Africa and Asia during the 20th century. Students are required to write short responses to the texts before class, a detailed analysis of one major theoretical work and a syntopical review essay which considers several works together. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 311. Contemporary Globalizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rcssci/311/001.nsf

This course examines the interactions among the political, economic and ecological dimensions of globalization processes since World War II. The focus is on the national policies and international institutions that shape these processes, and the causal feedback loops that link the global political economy to the world's ecosystem. Case studies that concretize and illuminate contemporary debates concerning these relationships are an integral part of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 344 / HISTORY 344. The History of Detroit in the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu), Stephen Ward (smward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the history of Detroit and the southeast Michigan region during the twentieth century. We will track important social, economic, and political transformations in the city's history: the persistence and impact of racial and ethnic conflicts; the ways in which class conflicts have shaped the urban landscape and the workplace; the impact of immigration on Detroit's social and political development; the interplay between the auto industry and the urban environment; the on-going struggles over political power and for control of the city; and the changing ways the city is represented, both among its citizens and in the broader American consciousness. Our investigation into Detroit history is designed to clarify how the city's past has created the conditions and circumstances of the present. Thus, while the course is organized chronologically and will include an overview of industrial expansion in the early 20th Century, our emphasis will be on the period during and after World War II, when Detroit, like many other American cities, underwent a series of interlocking changes in social structure and political economy that have had a continuing impact on contemporary problems and possibilities. We will examine the wartime economic expansion of the 1940s and 1950s; the patterns of racial conflict that shaped struggles over housing, jobs, public spaces, and political power in the city; the central role Detroit played in the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, as well the artistic and cultural production of this era; the patterns of white flight and the strategies of urban renewal deployed from the 1950s through the 1970s; the economic crisis of the 1970s and its impact on the racial configuration of city politics; and ensuing conflicts over urban planning, regional development; downtown revitalization; and community defense during the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of these inquiries is to highlight the relationship between past and present in Detroit and to develop a framework for understanding and interpreting the current conditions and conundrums in the city.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 357 / HISTORY 345. History and Theory of Punishment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the history and theory of punishment in the 19th and 20th Centuries. The main focus will be on the history of punishment in the United States, but we will draw on broader theoretical traditions and use comparative cases from other places. Central to the study will be patterns of change in punishment practices and how these reflect and/or foster new perspectives on who criminals are and what makes them misbehave. We will seek to understand how punishment systems create and defend coherent, if changing narratives about deviance, crime, and correction, and how these narratives work to organize the internal practices and the public discourse about punishment. Topics will include the invention of the penitentiary in the early/mid-19th Century, the development of industrial penology and the "big house" in the early 20th Century, contract labor systems and chain gangs that comprised penal practice in the American south after the Civil War, and the emergence of rehabilitative models of corrections and their crisis after the second World War. These historical explorations will frame a critical examination of contemporary penology and discourses on punishment. Class sessions will mix lectures with discussions and small group work. There will be several assigned books and a course pack; two essays and a final paper will supplant midterm and final exams. This is one of two required core courses for the Crime and Justice undergraduate academic minor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 001 Excellence, Equity, and the Politics of Education.

Instructor(s): David Thomas Burkam (dtburkam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the broad issue of educational equity, explored within the context of the many goals of American schooling. In particular, readings and discussions will assess: (1) the social distribution of educational resources, opportunities, and outcomes; (2) the role of schooling in reproducing and reinforcing prevailing economic, political, and social relationships; and (3) the potential contradictions between the societal functions of schooling and the professed goals of educators. Class time will follow a seminar format with student requirements, including (a) extensive readings and active participation/leadership in class discussions, (b) four short essays, and (c) a final research project with in-class presentation.

Readings will be drawn from a course pack and such texts as:

Bowles & Gintis (1976).Schooling in Capitalist America.

Bowen & Bok (1998).The Shape of the River: Long Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions.

Kozol (1991). Savage Inequalities.

Oakes (1985). Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality.

Powel, Farrar, & Cohen (1985). The Shopping Mall High School.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 002 Non-Violence in Action.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Over the past hundred years, nonviolent action by ordinary people has accomplished massive social change, toppling dictators, overthrowing colonial governments, ending participation in unjust wars, rewriting oppressive laws, reconciling victims and perpetrators, and healing families and communities. Nonviolent action requires leadership, intelligence, creativity, moral and physical courage, self-discipline, and brilliant strategy. Why then, do so many people believe that a nonviolent response to injustice or attack is unworkable, or "too idealistic"? Every major religion: Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Judaism, councils its followers to sanctify human life and treat all human beings as family. Why, then, do we continue to train young people to kill, maim, and terrorize others? Why do we support a military budget that is three times that of our major adversaries combined? Why do we call our country's aggression "just" and "noble," and our enemies' aggression "unjust," "mindless," and "evil"? Why do we caricature and dehumanize people of other races as a prelude to our aggression against them? Why are we so reluctant to investigate the root causes of violence: poverty, oppression, ignorance, and fear?

This new course will focus on powerful, nonviolent strategies that have been used successfully by people all over the world to respond to global and local conflicts. Its purpose is to convince you that nonviolence works, and to encourage you get involved in nonviolent action in your communities and your personal life. Through readings, videos, short, informal (but frequent) writing assignments, small group discussions, guest speakers, and student-initiated community action projects, you will become acquainted with various philosophies of nonviolence, examine case studies of strategic nonviolent action, learn ways to respond to arguments that justify war and aggression, practice nonviolent strategies, and link up with local peace and reconciliation groups for training, inspiration, and activism. Critical thinking and questioning are encouraged and expected. You don't need to be a pacifist to take this course! Time commitment: moderate to heavy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 003 Psychology of the Creative Process.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey E Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we explore the creative process in art making, in problem solving, and in human development. We will ask what creativity is, what function it serves in human evolution, and how it works in real lives. We will approach our exploration from three interacting psychological perspectives: the cognitive, the affective, and the life-historical. Cognitive and affective processes blend in the creative imagination; modalities considered include the visual-spatial, auditory, kinesthetic and linguistic. In this regard, dreaming as an autonomous imaginative process is compared with the more deliberate imagining of the conscious mind at work. Life-historical material, including stories of persons with symptoms and syndromes synesthesia, autism, manic-depression illuminate ways in which the creative process may be focused or stunted by cognitive or emotional extremes. Persons considered in this context include Vincent Van Gogh, Albert Einstein, Temple Grandin, Frida Kahlo, and Kay Redfield Jamison. Throughout, we will reflect on our own creative processes, and we will create dialogues with theory and with the lives of others.

This course is aimed at upper division students, either (1) those with a focus on psychology or other human science who want to broaden their studies to include creativity as a human activity, or (2) those with a primary focus on their own creative work, who want to deepen their understanding of the creative process through applying analytic tools of the sciences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 004 Deconstructing Whiteness: Alternative Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rcssci/360/004.nsf

This course will explore the history of race, class and gender as they are represented and misrepresented in American history texts and in the culture at-large. Many revisionist historians assert that publishers and authors of high school textbooks willfully misrepresent American history in order to increase sales, quell controversy, and manufacture an adult populace that will conform to contemporary standards of "good" citizenship. Authors and publishers have a propinquity to represent American history in hyper-patriotic, feel-good pedagogy. High school textbooks in particular seldom present class conflict, urban history, immigrant history, race conflict, women's history, environmental history, or political skullduggery. Publishers of these texts are extraordinarily sensitive to historical events that may be controversial on a regional basis. The same textbook will represent American history in different ways in different parts of the country.

We will examine the "misrepresentations" in popular notions of American history and attempt to determine their political and social ramifications in a society where educators and other scholars "misinform" its citizens. Primary attention will be placed on the deconstruction of our contemporary notions of "whiteness" and how gender is reflected in this notion. Students will be required to read six short books, a few short articles and view videos. Weekly e-mails are required. Students will also be required to lead class discussions based on the prior week's readings. The midterm assignment is an outline and annotated bibliography detailing a final research paper due at the end of the semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 005 Labor in Mexico's Maquiladora Zone: Nogales Field Study.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/winter/rcssci/360/005.nsf

A growing share of the world's manufacturing is performed in "export processing zones" (EPZ) in the global South. One of the largest of these zones, employing over one million workers, is located in Mexico in a twelve mile wide strip along the U.S. border. This course explores the conditions of labor in this EPZ, known as the maquiladora zone. The centerpiece of the course is a one week field trip to Nogales, Sonora (one hour south of Tucson, AZ) during the Spring Break. During this time, we do home-stays with people who work in the factories, we visit factories and talk with managers, we meet community and labor organizers who are attempting to promote the worker rights recognized in the Mexican constitution, and we talk with workers migrating from further south who are attempting to enter the U.S. illegally. Through readings, videos and the field experience in Nogales, this seminar course examines what workers are paid, what standard of living such wages permit, what rights maquila workers have, and rival explanations of these realities. We assess arguments that workers ought not to be paid more or treated better (e.g. the claim that any attempt at improvement would have negative impacts on foreign investment and employment). Finally, we evaluate the alternatives that critics of labor conditions in the maquilas, particularly the NGOs that belong to the tri-national Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, propose. This is a four credit course, capped at 20. Everyone in the course will be going to Nogales during the Spring Break. The course is open to all LS&A students; Residential College students will have priority for half the spaces.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 374. Race, Gender, and Empire in the Nuclear Age.

Section 001 Meets with History 396.001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of the instructor. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"The nuclear age" usually invokes the atom bomb, the superpower arms race, and the giant cooling towers of nuclear power plants. This vision leaves out the thousands of people who mined uranium and were displaced by test explosions of atomic weapons, and who included Africans, Native Americans, Australian Aborigines, and Pacific Islanders. The conditions they endured were shaped less by the technological demands of the nuclear age than by ideologies of race and gender and by colonial political structures.

This course examines the hidden side of the nuclear age. In the first part, assigned readings will help the student develop a framework through which to understand how dynamics of race, gender and empire shaped, and were shaped by the nuclear age. Students will then choose a case study and conduct their own research. Meetings during the second part will largely focus on working through and presenting student research.

This course counts as a research seminar toward the Academic Minor in Science, Technology & Society (http://www.umich.edu/~umsts).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

RCSSCI 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 001 Poetry as Social Activism.

Instructor(s): Derrick I M Gilbert (derrickg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although this is a "poetry" course, we will focus on the role of poetry off the page and outside of the classroom. That is, we will explore how poetry is used in community work and social activism. We will begin with an examination of historical literary social movements in which social engagement was the sine qua non of the aesthetic. Throughout the course we will also workshop each other's writings; however, we will focus on engaging our local Ann Arbor/Detroit communities with the written and spoken word.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 461. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 Immigrant Psychology. [3 Credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.006 and Psychology 401.003.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 401.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for RCSSCI.


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