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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 2:42 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Immigration in Films & Novels.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is currently in the midst of one of it's most intense periods of immigration. This seminar will study the depiction in films and novels of the experience of immigrants. We will seek historical and contemporary knowledge of American immigration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

If race is no longer thought of as a biological category, why is it still such a controversial issue for many Americans? This course will explore: the ways in which American interpretations of race have changed over time; the current growth of "whiteness" studies; the intersection within U.S. culture of race with other markers of differences such as ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and class; the historical impact of immigration, territorial expansion and globalization on definitions of U.S. citizenship. Course materials will include American literature and film, as well as scholarship drawn from American studies, sociology, history, and feminist theory.

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AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 003 US Literary & Legal Lives. Meets w/ English 140.002.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is the relationship between U.S. law and literature? How might one read the law as literature and, conversely, literature as the law? What is critical race theory? In this seminar on U.S. literary and legal lives, critical race theory provides us with new and exciting ways to read, write, and think about literature. It also reminds us of the ways in which the law impacts our lives, especially in this seminar with respect to sexuality, race, gender, and citizenship status. If, as critical race theory has taught us, whiteness is a form of property, what might it mean to think of citizenship, marriage, or heterosexuality as propertied? We will read key legal and legislative texts alongside literary and critical texts. For example, we will pair Mark Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson with Plessy v. Ferguson, the 1896 Supreme Court decision that affirmed segregation. In another landmark Supreme Court case Bowers v. Hardwick (1986), we will analyze the logic underpinning the regulation of sexuality, specifically the criminalization of homosexuality, while reading various legal scholars' interpretations of the case's significance. Other topics include internment, immigration, anti-miscegenation, and imperialism.

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AMCULT 201. American Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James W Cook Jr (jwcook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the relationship between ideology, culture, and power in U.S. History from the contested meanings of the Declaration of Independence to recent debates about the politics of Hip Hop. Along the way, we will consider a wide range of issues that have served as historical flashpoints in the nation's ideological development: slavery and anti-slavery; market capitalism and labor radicalism; the gospel of success and the self-made individual; immigration, the melting pot, and cultural pluralism; imperialism at home and abroad; segregation and civil rights; consumerism and the rise of modern countercultures. The course has two primary goals: first, to give you a sense of how "American values" have emerged in a variety of historical contexts; and second, to help you understand how value systems are enforced, contested, and re-fashioned. The use of the plural in the course title is deliberate. This is a course about the nation's core ideals, as well as their diverse meanings and shifting histories. It is also a course about the ongoing challenges of defining those ideals in truly democratic ways. Course requirements include regular attendance and active participation, 4 quizzes, an in-class midterm, and a longer take-home final exam.

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AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 Sports in American Culture.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 205. American Cultures.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture-and-discussion course focuses on the historic and cultural contexts of "what is an American" by bringing together narrative texts and architectural spaces that represent, interrogate, and complicate the concepts of national identity. We will pay close attention to the ways in which texts and architectural forms books and buildings recorded and interpreted various stages in the formation of Americanness. While telescoping onto the historic and literary moments in which the notions of race, gender, class, and ethnicity determined who did or did not belong in the idealized American social space, we will trace a fascinating dialogue between the making of this culture through stories, novels, and actual and imagined places, forms, and structures.

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AMCULT 210. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Women of color in America:History, Narrative &Identity. Meets with CAAS 201.001.

Instructor(s): Tiya A Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 201.001.

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AMCULT 211. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Learning from Experience: Intersectionality in the Everyday World.

Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 212. Introduction to Latino Studies Social Science.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, introductions, table talk, etc.

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AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of American Culture 222.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 224 / SPANISH 290. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Courses in Spanish

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Constanza Svidler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Spanish 290.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 231. Visual & Material Culture Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristin Ann Hass

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We will examine various theories and methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We will also explore issues to consider, such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator", legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories. Students will learn different strategies of how to prepare for, conduct, and process an oral history interview; how to develop an interview question guide, how to do background research, how to phrase questions to get the most out of an interview, and what type of equipment choices one has. Towards the latter half of the course, we will cover post-interview processing, including: transcribing, editing, indexing, and presenting. Students are expected to facilitate and participate in class discussions, and complete assignments that lead to a final project on a particular theme (i.e., conducting, transcribing, reading, work-shopping, processing, documenting, and presenting an oral history of a woman). By doing so, we will attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local community, adding to the oral history research available on women.

Prerequisite: WS 240/Intro to Women's Studies; or Equivalent, or Permission of Instructor.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. Meets February 11th Thru March 18th. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Roland Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 304 / SOC 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 304.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Asian/Pacific AmericanLeadership Development. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine strategies for building communities and developing leadership skills through practice. This term, the class focuses on the Asian Pacific American (APA) community in Michigan, especially in Detroit. The major component of the course is that each student is required to spend some time each week working in an APA campus or community-based organization. This is a class for all levels of student organizers, those with years of experience and those with little or none. Everyone is encouraged to share their experiences in class discussions and collaborate on like-minded projects or programs. This will be supplemented with course readings, exercises, guest speakers, field trips, and films that are relevant to APA Studies, the APA Movement, APA communities, Detroit, and activism. We will focus on research and community service projects, such as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, APA Studies conferences, and the Detroit Chinatown History Project, for organizations like the American Citizens for Justice (ACJ) and the Association of Chinese Americans (ACA) Drop-in Center in Detroit. For the final project, students will work together on public events and materials that educate and empower the community. Recommended: successful completion of (or concurrent enrollment in) at least one other APA Studies course, i.e. AC 214.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 312 / HISTORY 312. History of Latinos in the U.S.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AMCULT 315. (3). (Excl). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 314 / HISTORY 378. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente M Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers the histories of Asian Americans (South/South East/East/Filipino Americans) and Pacific Islander Americans in the United States. The focus is thematic, including immigration and circulation, race, class, and gender relations and formations, colonialism, imperialism, and contemporary cultural production. Written Requirements: 2 Book Reviews; 2 Reaction Papers; 1 Research Paper or Creative Project.

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AMCULT 318 / MODGREEK 318. Greek-American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vassilios Lambropoulos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Modern Greek 318.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 328 / ENGLISH 382. Native American Literature.

Native American Studies

Section 001 Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theodore Chamberlin (chambert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente M Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, restricted to American Culture concentrators, explores inter- and multi-disciplinary approaches to the study of American Culture. It begins with a brief examination of the historical emergence of, and transformations in, the discipline of American Studies, and proceeds to sample analytic approaches from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, film/video, and critiques of cultural studies, ethnic studies, and postcoloniality. The course will feature guest speakers from senior and new American Culture Faculty ranks. Requirements: brief reaction papers and a Research Project Proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department. Enrollment restricted to American Culture concentrators.

AMCULT 367 / HISTORY 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): GREGORY E DOWD (dowdg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a wide-ranging survey of Native North American encounters with European and American empires. It examines a variety of Native American responses to the challenges of conquest, dispossession, and colonialism. In doing so, it examines such Native American initiatives as religious revitalization, tribal development, legal challenges, and movements for intertribal unity. It examines a range of imperial, federal, and state approaches to what we might call Indian policy. Representations of Native Americans constitute another dimension of the course, as do the questions of identity, cultural change and transformation.

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AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Freedom Rides, Classic Rock, Motown, Vietnam, The Draft, Woodstock, Hippies, and the Great Society. The "Sixties" have a mythic quality in our political and cultural life. Current debates over the 1960's and the history of that decade mirror the very essence of American culture. This is the decade of peace, optimism, cultural turbulence, despair, war, and frustration. It was a time when basic assumptions and institutions were challenged. This course will explore the nature of American society through a look at the social and cultural movements of the 1960's. Specifically, we will examine the relationship between political and cultural change during that decade. How did movements for political and social change affect the life of the nation? Were cultural and demographic changes at the root of the decade's political upheavals? We will also examine how resistance to political and cultural change during the 1960's have influenced the conservative political and cultural movements that have flourished in the years since.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 410. Hispanics in the United States.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001 Urban Inequality and Conflict. Meets with Soc 435.001.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline Olvera

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 435.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 430 / WOMENSTD 430. Feminist Thought.

Section 001 The Body as a Site for Feminist Inquiry.

Instructor(s): Peggy S McCracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 240 and one 340-level WOMENSTD course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 436 / MUSICOL 456. Music of Asian Americans.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / LING 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Native American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 464 / HISTORY 464. Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 490 / FILMVID 451. American Film Genres.

Section 001 American Film Genres. Film attendance Monday 7-10:00pm is required..

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Asian American Psychology. [4 credits]. Meets with Psych 401.007.

Instructor(s): Phillip D Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide a critical review of the literature and research focusing on the personality, identity, and mental health status of Asian American groups in the United States. Some of the topics that will be examined within in this Asian American context are: 1) Personality types and characteristics; 2) Communication styles and behaviors; 3) Interracial relations and conflicts; 4) Family dynamics, role hierarchies, and intergenerational stress; 5) Acculturation and ethnic identity; 6) Interracial marriages and mixed-race children; 7) Prejudice/discrimination; and 8) Psychological stress/trauma and health/mental health functioning.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Harlem Renaissance. [4 credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.004.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH CENTURY. [4 Credits]. Meets with Hist 397.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 397.001.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 Blacks, Indians & Making of America. [3 Credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.007.

Instructor(s): Tiya A Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the intersections of Native American and African American histories and communities in the context of America's development as a British colony and as an independent nation. We will build upon material students have previously encountered in American Studies and Ethnic Studies to develop a nuanced appreciation of the historical interrelationship between Blacks and Indians and the conjoined role that these groups played in the formation of the American nation.

We will begin our course of study by analyzing conceptual frameworks for the complicated and multifaceted relationships that comprise the shared history of Native and Black peoples in the United States. Next we will discuss key historical moments and issues in Black and Native histories, with a focus on the themes of colonialism, slavery, racialization, community formation, and national identity. In the third and final unit of the course, we will move into an examination of the contemporary manifestations of this shared past, the current political implications of Native and Black relationships, and the construction and experience of Black Indian identities.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 Television, Society & Culture. [3 Credits]. Meets with Anthro 429.001.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 429.001.

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AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 Imperialism & Pacific Islnds 19C. [3 Credits]. Meets with HISTORY 498.003.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The discipline of history, and historical discourse more broadly, has often been significant in colonial practice. This course takes these moments as a starting point, and focusing on the Pacific island region, examines such colonial and postcolonial encounters through the histories they produced. Given such a broad topic, attention will be focused both regionally and thematically. Islands such as Samoa, Marquesas, Hawaii and New Zealand will be of particular concern, as will colonial administrators, anthropologists, collectors, missionaries, scientists and academics. However, this is not simply a traditional historiographical course. In class we will explore different indigenous modes, styles, and genres of history. These will include genres such as the nationalist written histories produced after formal decolonization, as well as forms less familiar outside of the islands, including oral literatures, poetry, music, and film. Particular attention will be given to indigenous historical discourse in the form of genealogies, the predominant form of island history.

Students need not have prior knowledge of the Pacific region. Assessment will be through class discussion, one shorter paper, and one major assignment.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Space, Archeology & Afro-American Identity. [3 Credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.001 and ARCH 409.053

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu) , Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Built environments and architectural practice have segregated African bodies within western societies and literally "set in stone" racial hierarchies invented in the wake of the transatlantic slave trade. This course examines the ways in which African American identities have been constructed around spatially contingent notions of race, gender, and nationhood. In addition to architectural explorations, we will also examine the works of James Baldwin, whose prose interrogates complex underpinnings of twentieth-century Americanness. Baldwin's texts will thus provide a rich narrative context for reading the spaces and architectural forms framing African American identity from the times of slavery, through segregation, and more recent racial strife in American urban centers.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 1920's Arts & Politics. [credits?]. Meets w/ English 417.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 1920's Arts & Politics. [credits?]. Meets w/ English 417.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 Pacific Literary And Cultural Studies. [4 credits]. Meets w/ English 417.009.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to provide students with a comparative approach to further study of Pacific cultures. Our primary texts include examples from the recent outpouring of literatures (poetry, fiction, drama, film) in English from the Pacific, including Hawaii, Western Samoa, Fiji, and New Zealand. We shall examine, for example, how texts by Maori authors Keri Hulme, Patricia Grace, Witi Ihimaera, and Alan Duff engage with historical, social, political, and cultural contexts in New Zealand and how their writings interrogate previous literary, anthropological, and historical representations of Pacific peoples. In addition to becoming familiar with the historically significant moments of contact with Europeans, we will also look at how the aesthetic politics of these writers may enact a cultural decolonization even as many of these places remain colonized and neo-colonized locations. Additional authors and texts to be studied include Albert Wendt, John Dominis Holt, Epeli Hau'ofa, Vilsoni Hereniko, Teresia Teaiwa, and films Once Were Warriors and The Piano. Writing requirements include several short 1-2 page response papers, a presentation, a midterm paper (5-7 pp.), and a final paper (10 pp.). As this course is a seminar, your presence and initiative in discussion is of great importance.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 Music & Dance. [3 Credits]. Meets w/Music 454.

Instructor(s): Amy K Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 006 Jewish and other Differences. [4 credits]. Meets with English 417.010.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will be reading and thinking about a wide variety of texts literary, cinematic, critical that pose the question of what kind of difference is represented by the historically resonant example of the Jew and/or Jewishness in American culture and society and how that form of difference interacts with other forms of difference, whether racial, ethnic, gendered, sexed. We will not be reaching any hard and fast conclusions, I hope, but rather charting the extraordinary amount of cultural and imaginative work that gets done through the these conjunctions. Although the critical works we examine will be drawn from a wide variety of cultures, our focus throughout will be American cultural expressiom between 1880 and the present day. Texts will be drawn from such sources as Henry James' The American Scene; the Warner Brothers' film The Jazz Singer (1929) and contemporary and subsequent critical commentary; Philip Roth's scandalous and highly successful novel Portnoy's Complaint; Tony Kushner's Pulitzer prize winning play Angels in America; Gish Jen's novel Mona in the Promised Land; as well as short fiction by Grace Paley, Gerald Shapiro, Bharthi Mukherjee, and a host of others. Critical texts will be drawn from the likes of Homi Bhabha, Lisa Lowe, Zygmunt Baumann, Alain Finkeilkraut, Daniel and Jonathan Boyarin, Judith Butler.

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Graduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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