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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Anthropological Archaeology


This page was created at 2:43 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ANTHRARC 180. First-Year Seminar in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001 The Aztecs of Ancient Mexico.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-year seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the most dramatic early encounters between Europeans and indigenous Americans occurred in 1519 in the Valley of Mexico when a Spanish imperial army entered the heartland of the Aztec Empire. Within a few years most of Mexico and Central America had become Colonial New Spain, with its capital at Mexico City atop the ruins of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. This seminar examines ancient Aztec society from three different perspectives: (1) archaeological remains, (2) 16th century documents, and (3) studies of the Aztecs' living descendants in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read and discuss examples of all three sources of information, with a focus on politics, religion, and economy, and the instructor will present some of the results of his own on-going research. There is no course text, but weekly readings will be assigned from relevant books and articles. Some key articles will be available as a course pack. Students will be evaluated on the basis of classroom participation and several short written exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 285(ANTHRCUL 285). Cult Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Cult Archaeology examines popular and fantastic interpretations of archaeological remains presented in the press and on television. We focus particularly on claims that cultural achievements by indigenous peoples are a consequence of contact with superior beings, such as aliens from outer space or other "more advanced" societies. We will examine the logical flaws in these pseudoscientific explanations and the racist assumptions that underlie them. The goal of this course is for students to learn critical thinking skills that will enable them to assess popular interpretations of archaeological remains in the future. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, participation, and two exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries. A course pack and readings from web sites will supplement the text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 386(ANTHRCUL 386). Early Civilizations.

Section 001 Early New World Civilization.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ANTHRARC 399. Honors in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the second half of the honors sequence in archaeology. Honors students will periodically meet as a group with the instructor to discuss the progress of their thesis, read each others work, and give constructive suggestions to each other. The majority of the academic term will be spent finishing data analysis and writing. Oral presentations of thesis conclusions will be presented to a general audience at the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRARC 400(ANTHRCUL 400) / CAAS 405. Field Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (8). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field Studies course provides students with an opportunity to participate in unique, original, and exciting research in West Africa. Students will be trained in fundamental methods and techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording, data analysis, map drafting. They will participate in an ongoing research project of the "Sine Ngayene Archaeological project" (SNAP) in South Central Senegal, entitled "CRAFT SPECIALIZATION, MORTUARY PRACTICES, AND SOCIAL DIFFERENTIATION: ARCHAEOLOGY OF SENEGAMBIAN MEGALITHS."

Field training is integrated with lectures on archaeological methods and theory, and the Archaeology of West Africa. Data processing sessions introduce students to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, pottery, animal bones, stone tools as well as plant remains. Each student is required to take notes on a daily basis that are read and commented on at the end of each week. The students will later use these notes to write an extensive 30-40 pages report. For those who may be interested a complementary "Archaeology Laboratory Studies" course is offered after the field season. In this sense, students will learn more about the long term curation of archaeological materials in museums contexts.

Course requirements: Daily excavation notes and a 30-40 page research report. Intended audience: Undergraduates with concentration in Anthropology, Archaeology, Afroamerican and African studies. Hours per week and Format: Eight hours/day, Five days/week, Ten weeks. Base: Ngayene Field Station. Field Season: January 15-March 20. Cost: $ 2,000 (including airfares, and transportation in Senegal. On the field, housing and food are funded by the project)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 401(ANTHRCUL 401) / CAAS 406. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in ANTHRARC 400. (6). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course aims to train students in core archaeological processing of excavated remains. It involves restoration, description, drafting, as well as cataloging. Students must be concurrently enrolled in ANTHRARC 400 in order to take this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 482(480). Topics in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001 Hunter-Gatherer Adaptations.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Humans have been hunter-gatherers (or foragers) for most of their existence, and much of the world was still peopled with hunter-gatherers at the time of European contact. Though most foraging societies are now gone, there is a vast and fascinating body of ethnohistoric and ethnographic literature documenting the foraging way of life, and this literature provides the foundation for much of our thinking about how humans lived and changed over the vast time-span of the Pleistocene.

This course will examine current trends in the study of hunter-gatherers, focusing on a specific subset of major issues and problems centered on forager diet and subsistence; mobility and settlement patterns; health and reproduction; and patterns of interaction and exchange. Topics will consider both the "living" or ethnographic context, and the use of such information to develop models and testable hypotheses for exploring forager behavior in the past.

The course will be structured as a seminar, although some of the details of format will depend on the number of students that actually enroll, and the mix of undergraduates and graduates. Each week there will be a series of readings on a topic that must be read by all participants in the course. These articles will be available as a course pack at the beginning of the semester (est. cost $40). In addition, in order to pass the course a brief (250 word) synopsis of the main points of each of the assigned readings must be turned in on the day they are to be discussed (the dates will be provided in the course syllabus handed out at the beginning of the term). Most sessions will begin with a brief presentation by the instructor concerning the topic at hand. This will then be followed by student-led presentations and discussions of the week's readings, to be coordinated by a different group of students each week. In addition to the assigned readings and discussions, graduate students must prepare a 25 to 30 page research paper on some particular topic or issue, the specifics of which will be worked out early in the term in consultation with the instructor. Undergraduates will have the option of either taking two in-class exams or writing a research paper (a decision as to which option will be selected must be made early in the term).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRARC 497(ANTHRCUL 497). Museum Research Techniques.

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a total of six credits elected through ANTHRARC 496 and 497. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Museum Techniques is the oldest course in the Department of Anthropology. It is designed to teach students about the organization and function of museums in general with specific examples derived from anthropology museums. Topics include the ethics of museum collecting, classification of collections, storage, conservation, collection management, public outreach, and legal constraints. The class will be a lecture-discussion format. Most readings will be electronic library, web, and a text. Students electing 1 credit hour will attend lectures and complete exercises and exams for a grade. Students electing 2 or 3 hours will have a hands-on experience with collections in the museum for 2 or 4 hours respectively.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Get on waitlist on wolverine access and professor will contact you before the first class.

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRARC.


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This page was created at 2:43 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.


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