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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biology


This page was created at 2:44 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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BIOLOGY 108. Introduction to Animal Diversity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Myers (pmyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to describe the diversity of animals. Students will learn about the diversity of animal life, accumulate information and experience that will enhance their appreciation of the natural world, and gain background to enable them to understand better current issues concerning biodiversity and conservation. Lectures will be presented by faculty who work with the animals being considered. Topics for each group of animals studied will include a description of diversity, evolutionary background, natural history, and issues concerning conservation or biodiversity. Students will attend three lectures and one discussion section per week. Grades for the course will be based on two midterms, a paper, participation in discussion section activities, and a final exam. Textbooks:
Animal Diversity, 2nd. edition, by Hickman, Roberts, and Larson.
Diversity of Life, College Edition, by E.L. Wilson.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 109. Ecological Knowledge and Environmental Problem Solving.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John T Lehman (jtlehman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The world presents us with many types of environmental problems. Everyone needs to have a basic understanding of the scientific knowledge and theories that are needed to solve these problems, so that they can make informed decisions as educated citizens. We will use a case study approach to learn how to apply knowledge and theory to the process of developing solutions.

Examples of the kinds of case studies that we will study include:

  1. Use and subsequent ban on use of DDT and PCB, including examples from Michigan
  2. Control of vampire bats in Central and South America
  3. Reservoir construction and mercury poisoning
  4. Role of wastewater treatment facilities in the water quality of lakes along the Huron River near Ann Arbor
  5. Acid Rain
  6. Biological species invasions
  7. Ecological effects of nuclear radiation
  8. Climate change and efforts to reverse current trends
  9. Landscape fragmentation, spotted owls and other examples
  10. Habitat restoration

Additional readings will include the nature of science, debates about science vs. "junk science", and even about the mindsets of typical scientists. This course can be elected by undergraduate students in any year of their degree program. There will be two lectures per week.

Grading is based on two in-class written examinations and graded evaluation of a final paper or PowerPoint presentation. The exams will focus on the critical elements of different case studies. The final project will give you the opportunity to identify an environmental problem, state elements of theory, report present understanding about the problem, and suggest ways to verify the facts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 118. AIDS and Other Health Crises.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert A Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio118/index.htm

This course is designed for non-concentrators with a minimal background in the sciences. The course focuses on the concepts of health and disease and their impact on society. It also focuses on the impacts of the structures and attitudes of society on health and disease. We will examine a number of health crises, especially AIDS, from the multiple viewpoints of science, medicine, public health, law, social prejudices, mass media, high culture, and the historical effects of health and disease. Specific topics will include extensive discussions of "Mad Cow Disease," Syphilis from 1880 to the present, and the tragic story of Mary Mallon ("Typhoid Mary") as well as some discussion of cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, and the black death. About half of the course will be devoted to AIDS. The course consists of two 90-minute lectures per week and a 1-hour discussion led by a graduate student instructor. Grades are based on five in-class exams and an optional final exam.

Required Reading: Deadly Feasts by Richard Rhodes; And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 162. Introductory Biology.

EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN FEB 3, MAR 5, AND MAR 24, 6-8 PM.

Instructor(s): Laura J Olsen (ljo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, (734) 764-1430.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: Call 764-1430 for wait list information.

BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

BIOLOGY 225. Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen A Ocorr (kocorr@umich.edu) , Paul W Webb

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and a year of chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio225Winter/

This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals and emphasizes zoological rather than human aspects. The course uses evidence from different groups of organisms to identify the general principles of functional mechanisms. It also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey. The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three one-hour lectures a week, three one-hour examinations, and a final exam. The web site for this course is located at http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio225/winter

TEXT: Biology, (5th ed.) by Campbell, Reece and Mitchell.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 226. Animal Physiology Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 (or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 325, with permission). Students who intend at a later date to take BIOLOGY 225 will not be admitted to BIOLOGY 226 without special permission. (2). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio226/

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Winter 2001, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 262 / UC 262 / PSYCH 232. Evolutionary Biology and Human Disease.

Section 001 High school Biology including basic knowledge of genetics recommended.

Instructor(s): Vaughn S Cooper (vcooper@umich.edu) , Alan Weder (aweder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). Biology 262 cannot be used to satisfy any concentration requirements in Biology, General Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, and Plant Biology. The course also cannot be counted as credit for a Minor in Biology. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/courses/darmed/links.htm

See University Courses 262.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 281. General Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Korinna Schueller

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and a laboratory course in chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ecology is the study of how organisms (animals, plants, and microbes) interact with each other and their environment over space and time. In this course we will explore a range of topics, from how organisms tolerate and modify their physical environment (physiological and ecosystem ecology), to how they interact - often in complex, indirect ways - with members of the same species (population ecology) and other species (community ecology). Students will also learn the approaches ecologists take to test hypotheses and how ecological principles apply to current conservation and environmental problems. There are two lectures and one 2-hour discussion per week. BIOLOGY 281 is intended for natural science concentrators. Students who have completed (or nearly so) the prerequisites for their natural science concentration will be better prepared to take BIOLOGY 281.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 305. Genetics.

Section 001 EXAMS WILL BE HELD MONDAYS, FEB 3, MAR 10, AND MAR 31, 6-8:00 PM.

Instructor(s): Steven E Clark (clarks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio305/bio305.html

Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in Eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics.

There are three hours of lecture each week and one discussion section directed by GSIs. The discussion sections expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three term exams and a final covering lectures, discussions, and reading assignments. Exams include new problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections or the Genetics Study Center. The three term exams are given Monday nights.

Text: Genetics. From Genes to Genomes (1st edition) by Hartwell et al.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ursula H Jakob (ujakob@umich.edu) , Kenneth J Balazovich (kbalazo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 or a 200-level course in Biology taken at UM; and CHEM 210. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 311, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course gives an introduction into the world of biological chemistry. The course starts out with the molecular design of life an introduction to proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. These molecules will then be put into context when bioenergetics and metabolism will be discussed. The students will also learn how cells transcribe DNA and translate RNA into polypeptides, how polypeptides adopt their specific three-dimensional structure to become proteins and how proteins then fulfill their individual functions in enzyme catalyzed reactions, assist in the formation and function of membranes, and other important cellular processes. The major metabolic pathways will also be introduced. Other topics that will be discussed include biosignaling and hormone action. The students will learn how to apply bioinformatics to obtain useful information about genes and proteins using databases and will obtain valuable knowledge about state of the art biochemical and molecular biology techniques. Once a week, there will be a discussion session in addition to the lecture. Here, lecture material can be clarified, study guide questions will be discussed and projects will be evaluated. Grades in this course are based on the performance in discussion session, projects, and three in-class exams (no final exam is offered).

Textbooks:

  • Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry by Nelson and Cox. 3rd. Edition
  • Absolute, Ultimate Guide to Principles of Biochemistry by Osgood and Ocorr. 3rd. Edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 390. Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David P. Mindell (mindell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162; prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 305. (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at the Biological Station). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at the Biological Station).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a comprehensive lecture and discussion section course covering the evolution of organisms. This includes critical examination of: the origin of evolutionary thought, evolution at the molecular level, genetic change among populations and higher taxa, natural selection, speciation, phylogenetic systematics, the fossil record, development, patterns of extinction, biogeography, coevolution, and human evolution. Weekly discussions will focus on primary literature. One midterm test and one cumulative final exam will test students' knowledge of evolutionary biology. Writing assignment(s) based on readings from the primary scientific literature will be required. Textbook: Evolutionary Biology by D.J. Futuyma

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Graduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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This page was created at 2:44 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.


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