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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 3:45 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Native American Fiction.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All Americans know something about Native Americans – at least they think they do. Stereotypes abound and, for most of our history, most of them have been vicious. But all stereotypes are damaging to the people they include, even the most benign and supposedly positive. Where vicious stereotypes would silence and discredit those they target, stereotypes of the supposedly benign kind are all too ready to speak for them, preempting their own efforts to speak the truth as they see it. The course will involve a close study of some five works of fiction by Native American writers, all of which powerfully contradict the usual ways of imagining and thinking about "Indians." It will begin with an extended look at a work which is neither fictive nor entirely Native-authored, John Neidhardt's Black Elk Speaks; this will help us to identify certain crucial problems in the reading and interpretation of texts infused with Native American cultural values and emerging from Native American experience, from a perspective outside those values and that experience. Subsequent readings will include D'Arcy McNickle's The Surrounded, James Welch's The Death of Jim Loney, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Louise Erdrich's Tracks, and Sherman Alexie's Smoke Signals. Students will be required to make several class presentations, to write weekly response papers as well as two short essays, and to participate in a group research project culminating in an end-of-term presentation and a collaboratively written paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 – US Literary & Legal Lives. Meets w/ AMCULT 103.003.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 103.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Midwest is home to more Nobel Prize Winners in Literature than any other comparable region of the world. What is it about this area that has captured the imagination of the nation? What is it about this literature that resonates so widely with people from other countries that they award it so many prestigious honors? Join us as we explore the writings of Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway, Saul Bellow and Toni Morrison who, though they may not all write about the Midwest all of the time, write with a "midwestern sensibility." What is "midwestern literature"? How have these writers helped to shape and define it?

Assignments include weekly Reading Responses and a final project (a term paper or a Web-page).

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003 – Reserved for CSP students. Contact the CSP office for a Permission.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Martin Bankowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages is required.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Ian Stuart Twiss

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hilary Joan Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Hilary Joan Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 003 – Sections 003 and 004 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP Office for a Permission.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

(Contact the Comprehensive Studies Program Office for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

(Contact the Comprehensive Studies Program Office for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Joseph C Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Kelly Elizabeth Allen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): James Paul Crane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Hilary Joan Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kay Laken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Gene Lambert Laskowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Robert E Cosgrove

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Sara Kathleen Talpos

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Dean

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Anne G Berggren (agbergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Scott M Hutchins

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s): Scott M Hutchins

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020 – Section 021 and 021 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP Office for a Permission.

Instructor(s): Randall L Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Randall L Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s): Sara Kathleen Talpos

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Joseph C Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Jason Christopher Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Dean

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kay Laken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Peggy Lynn Adler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Jason Christopher Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Shubha Venugopal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Gene Lambert Laskowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Peggy Lynn Adler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the simplest terms, reading is an activity that transports the reader into a world created by the author and the text. If we agree that this is a function of reading, we will be going for a long and fascinating journey in this course. This course isn't about English literature but literature in English. Keep the distinction in mind. The legacy of the English empire forefronts English as a language that exists and functions globally. However, this displacement of English from center to margin has resulted in some strange and wonderful creations. We will be reading some of these literary works, traveling abroad to places like India, Nigeria, South Africa, Hong Kong, Trinidad and New Zealand. We may be surprised by where our travels will take us, perhaps heading over to England's next door neighbor, Ireland, or even coming home to the United States for a spell. No passport is required but keep in mind that this is a group activity. We travel together and that means no stragglers. Our readings will include works from, but not limited to, Kipling, Tagore, Joyce, Woolf, Ishiguro, Okri, and Hulme. Attendance is mandatory and the timely completion of assignments will be re-enforced with in-class writing assignments. Formal writing assignments include two papers (5-7 pages) and two shorter (2-3 pages) literary analyses.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001 – Inventing Reality (Honors).

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~merla/

In this course, we will focus on the novel to explore some of the factors prompting the question "what is literature." From their inception, as John Fowles contends, fiction writers shared the "wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Imitating life was the goal, in as diverse renderings of so-called "reality" as George Eliot's depiction of "ordinary life," or R.L. Stevenson's fantasy-like version of the odd couple of Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde; or Virginia Woolf's impressionistic interior monologues. Even post-modern writers, cynical about any professed connection between literature and reality presented their own versions of reality by foregrounding their inability to be certain about the conclusions to their texts (John Fowles) or denying having any privileged information about their characters (both Fowles and Tim O'Brien). Shifting literary styles, and the changing philosophical definitions of social and psychological reality that shaped them, will be our subject. Texts will include, John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman, Toni Morrison's, Sula, short stories by Hemingway and Kundera, Tim O'Brien's, In the Lake of the Woods, Art Spiegelman's Maus I and Maus II, Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse. Any additional texts will be listed on my web site. Requirements: a 6-8 pg essay, a 10 pg essay, and a final, class participation, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002 – Literature of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~zoid/

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 – Global Literature.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the most exciting consequences of the development of English as a global language has been the emergence of a body of writing that has challenged the assumed relationship between nation, language, and literature. This course will be an invitation to discover this "new" English literature, its elaborate cultural context, and its inventive use of the English language. Through a reading of both established and new writing from Africa, India, the Caribbean, and the Pacific, we will explore the ways in which this literature has developed in response to the complex relationship between Britain and her former colonies, the demands of nationalism and narratives of cultural identity, and the challenges of producing literature in the language of "the other." How does this new literature reconcile its need to represent local situations with its global ambition? Does the new English literature demand different strategies of reading and interpretation? How has it transformed the form of the English language and the idea of literature itself? To answer these questions we will read a selection of writers from Africa (Amos Tutuola, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, and Tsitsi Dangarembga), India (R. K. Narayan, Mulk Raj Anand, and Anita Desai), the Caribbean (Jean Rhys and Michelle Cliff), and the pacific (Albert Wendt).

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004 – Telling Stories: A Need to Narrate.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is it about being human that so encourages the urge "to tell" our stories to others? We, at times, play with constructing our lives into related memories, into our "stories." Primarily, the way in which we write our futures depends on "seeing" and articulating small glimpses of our past. We will want, in this class, to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example, a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones from the River thinks: Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to - until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone. Like the character in Stones, our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process – our own as well as the author's. We will mainly be reading and discussing 20th Century literature, and although the final reading list is still to be determined, the following authors will be considered for inclusion: John Irving, Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Katherine Harrison, Michael Chabon, Michael Cunningham, Isabelle Allende, Alice Sebold, and Philip Roth. Requirements: two exploratory, analytical, essays and a comprehensive final exam.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our method throughout the semester will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking, "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] literature?" 'Family' (and how that concept may vary) is the thematic lens through which we will study several contemporary novels. We will interrogate as well the notion of "home." We will begin by practicing our interpretive skills through "close readings" of Toni Morrison's Sula. This will be followed by an investigation of how earlier "literary" texts-e.g., Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana -affect our reading of a novel, in this case Ron Hansen's Atticus. With Edwidge Dantidat's The Farming of Bones we will turn our attention to the relationship between representations of history and subjectivity in historical fiction. We will enhance our reading of Marilynn Robinson's Housekeeping through a study of selected critical essays, and in the process practice identifying what is at stake in the arguments presented. Finally, we will put it all together in our discussion of Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood.

There will be two one-page position papers, two exams, and one five-page paper due. Class attendance and participation are essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is Literature? What is literature? How do we read? Why read a printed text in today's media culture? Distinctions are customarily made and often arbitrarily applied to texts that constitute Literature/literature. Most importantly, the influences of a media-driven society have created a climate that makes it increasingly difficult for a reader to sit alone with her own mind for hours engrossed in reading for pleasure. In a media-driven culture, creating multiple and varied texts, it is increasingly challenging to construct parameters around Literature/literature as well as lines of demarcation. In this course, we will read examples of what we regard as Literature/literature, and how different forms of literacy have developed as result of today's media and influence the way that writers writer Literature/literature and readers read Literature/literature.

Reading List: Beowulf; Jazz -Toni Morrison; Grendel -John Gardner; The Color Purple -Alice Walker; Their Eyes Were Watching God -Zora Neale Hurston; Bone Black -bell hooks; Clifford's Blues -John A. Williams; The Bell Jar -Sylvia Plath; Loon Lake- E. L. Doctorow; A Very Easy Death- Simone de Beauvoir.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through close readings and analyses of a wide variety of short stories, we will develop a deep understanding of how this form works and gain insights into the ways in which all forms of fiction are written and received. Elements to be discussed include characterization, voice, style, structure, dialogue, setting, point of view and theme. In addition to reading stories for every class, students will be required to keep a reading journal and write two four-page critical essays and a five-to-ten page short story.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be an author, to create a story? To figure that out, we'll be authors ourselves a little and ask about our own responses as readers. We'll read texts closely, attempting to understand their less accessible meanings, the effect of the social and economic context in which they are written and read, and what's at stake for us, if anything, in the content. We'll be interested in the social purposes of literature and in questions of authors' responsibilities. We'll read or view The Official Story; Interviews with My Lai Veterans; Wiesenthal's The Sunflower; Coetzee's Age of Iron; Thomas' The White Hotel; Kingsolver's Pigs in Heaven; Baca's A Place to Stand, Cervantes' Emplumada; and excerpts from Abbey's Desert Solitaire and Matthiessen's The Birds of Heaven. Class participation will be important, and you'll write 25 pages worth of essays and literature, the nature of which we'll determine together. No exams.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"There's no there there," Gertrude Stein wrote dismissively about her hometown (Oakland, California). So, nearly a century ago, she set out for Paris and became famous. For her, there was elsewhere. Too often, I think, Michiganders fail to see there's a here right here, a place that writers have used as the foundation for literary invention. So in our search for answers to the question that titles this course, we will read writers who have made our part of the world into fictional worlds. We will read novels and short stories involving our own Great Lakes homeland. Among the writers will be Sherwood Anderson, Charles Baxter, Theodore Dreiser, Janet Kauffman, Jim Harrison, Alice Munroe, Toni Morrison, and David Treuer. A mid-term, final, and a series of 3-5 page papers will be required. We will learn about literature by writing and talking about it.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Maria V Sanchez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We live in a period of immensely rich poetic production in the United States: men and women of widely divergent cultural backgrounds, aesthetic persuasions, and registers of "voice" are producing lyric poetry of unprecedented variety and abundance. But how is a reader to find foothold among the hundreds of literary magazines and book publications that clamor for attention? How to negotiate between private pleasure (and solace and reflection) on the one hand and this jubilant (and contentious and contradictory) marketplace of verse on the other? How to find a listening post midst all this noise? This course is not conceived as an historical survey, but we will spend approximately half the term examining poems from another period of intense lyric production – the 16th and 17th centuries in England – because these poems provide a particularly vivid introduction to the resources, and resourceful violations, of traditional poetic form. In the second half of the term, we will read and discuss and listen to a group of recent American poems, ones I think are particularly good at suggesting the variety of contemporary pleasures, good too at constructing the margin of silence that poetry, like other forms of music, requires in order to be heard. From this modest, two-pronged historical perspective, we will explore some highly immodest questions about poetic form: How does it make meaning? How does it sound? What is its relationship to human imagination?

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is introductory insofar as it presents the basic terms of critical discussion about poetry and the basic period-concepts. Presentation of these terms and concepts will follow from the examples of the poems (and, of the poetic kinds and periods) studied, in lieu of a more abstract and categorical method of proceeding. The chief difficulty of the course will be the work of synthesis expected of the students both in class and in their written assignments.

Materials: to consist of a poetry anthology representing an array of poems written in English, early modern through contemporary; technical handbook (reference: meters, verse forms, tropes)

Requirements: six short papers on assigned topics;possible in-class presentations; possible final

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lyall H Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Poetry at its best is a mode of human communication, both vocal and scriptural, the aim of which is not the imparting of information per se – like "Directions" on a soup can or "Instructions" for an erector set – but rather intellectual and emotional engagement with some important human concern like love, folly, death, fun, etc. We will begin by looking at kinds of poems and how they work – like learning the rules and techniques of basketball or chess or dancing (and other pleasurable activities); then we will look at the range of treatment given those "human concerns" in poems written over the centuries. We will consider particularly how poems communicate what they want to engage us in and entertain us with. We will discuss these matters in class, write about them in a few short exercises (2 pp. each) and a couple of little essays (5 pp. each), and commit some good poetic example (say 50 lines) to memory. The course has little practical use: it just helps you understand human creatures (including yourself) and how they interact with each other – merely educational.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter ed.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course discusses and analyzes numerous samples of poetry by past and present practitioners. We will ask: What makes a poem, and how do we know this? Do poems tell stories? Is poetry oral or written? Who is poetry for? In addition to reading poems selected from an anthology, we will look in detail at the works of at least two contemporary poets – if possible, the same poets that we hear when, as members of this extraordinarily lively writing community, we attend two poetry readings held outside of class. Course evaluation will be based on oral contributions (class discussion and an oral presentation), as well as the assigned writings, which include one-page responses to the poetry readings; several short analyses of specific poems, and one longer paper that compares several poems in terms of theme, form, and/or imagery. To sharpen our poetry-reading skills, we will also memorize / recite a small poem in class, and do some (non-graded) poetry-writing exercises.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a coursepack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the techniques of verse – how poems are put together and how they work. We will consider a wide range of texts from the Renaissance to the present day, with an emphasis on shorter lyric poetry. Requirements include full class participation, several written exercises, an oral project based on the study of a major poet, and a final exam. Readings will be from The Norton Introduction to Poetry (8th edition), Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook, and Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): James Boyd White (jbwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to learn to read poetry by doing it together. We shall read with care a series of poems drawn from different periods of English and American literature, focussing attention on what makes each poem work: its formal and metric structure, its imagery, the tension between its rhythms and those of ordinary speech, its tones of voice and imagined speakers, it ironies, ambiguities, allusions, and surprises. Our central question is what kind of meaning each poem has, and how that meaning is made. The idea is to work with poetry at its very best, in the hopes that we can learn from reading this set of poems how to read others as well.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Ted Chamberlin (chambert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce a wide range of poetry, from various periods and cultural traditions, to familiarize students with aspects of poetic technique and build interpretive skills. The relationships between spoken and written language; between poetry and prose; and between poetry, painting and music will form part of the discussion. Assignments will include two short papers, a longer term paper and an oral presentation. There will be no final examination.

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ENGLISH 245 / RCHUMS 280 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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ENGLISH 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001 – Shakespear Without Tears.

Instructor(s): William Ingram (ingram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will have something for everyone: for the student new to Shakespeare as well as the student familiar with the plays or with experience acting in them. We will study six plays, some of them familiar, some not. We will explore the plays first as pieces for the stage, which is what their author had in mind for them. We will also discuss the problems attendant on treating them (as we tend to do nowadays) as literary works, and how literary-critical approaches to the plays intersect with theatrical approaches. We welcome students interested in both literature and theater. We will also set the plays in their cultural and historical context, a fascinating subject in itself.

The course will be a team effort by the two teachers, and will revolve around intelligent writing and active discussion by students. Students wishing further information may e-mail either of the teachers at ingram@umich.edu or aboboc@umich.edu.

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ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover some of the classic works of American fiction: The Scarlet Letter,Billy Budd, Huckleberry Finn, Daisy Miller, The Red Badge of Courage, The Awakening, The Age of Innocence, The Great Gatsby, As I Lay Dying, and Their Eyes Were Watching God.

There will be frequent short writing assignments, two 4-5 page papers, and two exams.

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ENGLISH 285. Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will consider how a variety of writers reflect and respond to the major historical, social, political, philosophical, and moral issues and preoccupations of the 20th century. The works we will study are eclectic and arbitrarily chosen; there is no attempt to be all-inclusive, nor will we limit ourselves to English and American authors. Our subject will be some representative works of modern thought and literature. We will place equal emphasis on what these works say and how they say it. Our purpose is to sharpen the insight and intelligence with which we read and analyze some of the probing "documents" of our time. Candidates for the reading list [availability of texts and reasonableness of prices will be factors] include works by Albert Camus, D.M. Thomas, E.L. Doctorow, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Friedrich Duerrenmatt, Jerzy Kosinski, Margaret Atwood or several others. Informal lecture and discussion, the amount of which will be influenced by the size of the class. Thoughtful, active participation "counts." Two papers [ca. 5-7 pp. each] and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 301. The Power of Words.

Section 001 – Language and Gender. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Anne Leslie Curzan (acurzan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The relationship of language and gender has fascinated speakers and scholars for centuries, from Protagorus – who is said to have created the labels masculine, feminine, and neuter for nouns – to authors of current popular literature such as Deborah Tannen. Do women and men use language differently? Do women speak more "properly" than men? Is the English language sexist? Are these, in fact, the questions we should be asking? Our explorations of the relationship of language and gender in this course will have a dual focus: constructions of gender in the structure (grammar and lexicon) of language, and of the English language specifically; and the ways in which gender plays out in patterns of discourse, especially in relation to other factors such as race, class, socioeconomic status, and age. In the process, we will address the complex relationship of language, identity, and power. As we read some of the most frequently cited articles in the field, we will outline the progression of language and gender research since 1975, when Robin Lakoff's book Language and Women's Place was published; by the end of the course we will be in the position to discuss the future of gender and language studies – what questions we think should be the focus of investigation. The work commitments will include short weekly written assignments, two papers (one of which will involve the transcription and analysis of a tape-recorded spoken conversation), and a final exam. No background in linguistics is required; a genuine interest in the workings and power of language is highly recommended.

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ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

This course satisfies the requirement for a course in language for English concentrators in the Teaching Certificate Program and fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 309. American English.

Section 001 – Multilingual America. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All languages ever spoken in the Americas are immigrant languages, and all have contributed to the American English we speak today. In our course we will study a variety of languages, especially those in the heritage of the students who enroll. (If your background is Polish, Hispanic, Korean, African-American, or almost anything else, there will be a special project for you in this course.) The United States has always been a multilingual nation, but our government has seldom been supportive of languages other than English. We will focus particularly on how linguistic diversity has been "managed" by official and unofficial actions through our national history. We will also look at future trends in linguistic diversity and consider their impact on us and the world. Two short papers, one major research paper, a midterm, and a final are required.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 010 – Science Fiction.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313SFw03.htm

We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams. Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 – Women and Novels. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ilana M Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will investigate the relationship between women and novels. Beginning in the late seventeenth century and making our way into the early twentieth, we will explore the ways women s lives have been imagined by female and male novelists. At the same time, we will consider how developments in print technology and publication practices shaped both the genre of the novel and the role of women as authors, readers, and subjects of fiction. Readings may include: Aphra Behn, Oronooko ; Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders; Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey; George Eliot, Mill on the Floss; Charles Dickens, David Copperfield; George Gissing, New Grub Street; Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 – Women's Writing in America. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sara Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as a survey of the developing traditions of women's writing in the U.S. throughout the last century and more, during the era we understand as modernity. We'll spend time not only with the major literary genres (the novel, the lyric, drama, short fiction, autobiography) and some popular ones (romance, film), but also with different ways of thinking – historically, critically, textually – about women and the writing they produce and read. Some of our key questions: What kinds of social and imaginative spaces do women writers (and readers) occupy? What strategies do they adopt to address particular aspects of their shared, or their nationally or ethnically particular, experience? Do women readers have distinctive strategies or interests; why and how do they read? Our writers will include Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sui Sin Far, Anzia Yezierska, Sylvia Plath, Toni Morrison, Grace Paley, Bharati Mukherjee, and Gish Jen. Course requirements will probably include a midterm and final exam, reading journal, and three short essays.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 003 – Women and Literature in Medieval England. Satisfies the pre-1600, pre-1830, and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores women's relationship to medieval literary culture: we will read works by medieval women, including Marie de France, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe, as well as works accessible to or written for women, including romance, civic drama, and devotional and moral literature. We will also read anonymous texts in a feminine voice (the Findern lyrics) and non-literary texts written by women (letters written by the Paston women). Texts will be studied through the variety of social contexts-court, cloister, and city- in which women's literary activity took place, so that we can trace the relationship between gender and other cultural categories in medieval England. Some key topics for the course include: how expectations about women's relation to literature influenced the texts women wrote, how women writers responded to those expectations in startling ways, and how women's access to certain genres as readers and patrons affected the shape and social meaning of medieval literary traditions. Course requirements: two papers, a take-home exam, and either a presentation or creative project.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 – U.S. Culture of the 1950s

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines diverse currents of American literature, film, music, and cultural criticism from the 1950s, a decade that witnessed America's emergence as a global "superpower." The works under discussion will be examined in relation to key social and historical phenomena, such as the rise of the Cold War, the expansion of the middle class, the "re-domestication" of women after the war, and the beginning stages of the Civil Rights movement. The writers we will consider include Grace Metalious, Norman Mailer, Ralph Ellison, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, John Cheever, James Baldwin, Tillie Olsen, and Jack Kerouac. We will also listen to selected Jazz recordings and view representative anti-Communist and "liberal conscience" films. Students will write two papers (4-6 pages) and do an in-class presentation; there will also be a mid-term and a final exam.

This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 – Intergenerational Memory in U.S. Literature. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, our focus will be on the painful and intensely illuminating process of storytelling that transmits the experience of traumatic events – such as slavery, the Holocaust, rape, internment, expulsion, and lynching – to later generations. These novels, films, and musical works show that private, individual memories are often reexperienced by the storyteller's descendents in unexpected ways. In such works, individuals who have been told of crimes committed against their parents or grandparents experience the violence of these events in their own lives.

We'll examine the ways that writers, directors, musicians, and artists turn private memories into public documents – novels, films, songs, images – in order to demonstrate the lingering effects of ancestral memories on present-day lives. These stories raise important questions about art and the process of producing collective memory.

What is the impulse or objective of intergenerational stories? How do these artists come to terms with the burden of responsibility that such stories produce? What sort of creative methods of artistic expression do the inheritors of these memories invent in order to live up to this legacy of responsibility? How might intergenerational stories be foundational to identity?

We'll read texts featuring characters that seek to understand how their identities have been shaped – consciously and unconsciously – by inherited memories that they experience as their own. The readings will include novels, short stories, and poems by William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, John Okada, Gayl Jones, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Art Spiegelman, as well as films and jazz/blues recordings. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class meetings; film and musical materials will also be available at the Film and Video Library and on reserve.

Course requirements include informed participation, quizzes, one short essay (2-3 p.), and a final essay (10-12 p.). For attendance and waitlist policies, see course website.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 – Anarchy in the U.S.A.: Exploring Radical Art.

Instructor(s): John McGuigan (jmcguig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An attempt to "think historically" motivates this course, an attempt we'll engage both in theoretical terms (What can it mean to think historically?) and in practical terms (How can one do it?). In some ways, we can change the past, and do so every day – not in terms of what happened but in our understanding of it. Using the University's Labadie Collection, we'll confront these issues by exploring the complex relationship between art and politics, discovering the concrete artifacts that surround and inform twentieth-century works of literature written in America prior to World War II. In the Western world, this particularly rich period saw an explosion of oppositional art movements (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, etc.) and political movements (socialism, anarchism, fascism, etc.). Studying art works of various media alongside contemporaneous reactions and primary documents from radical political movements lets us examine not only relationships between specific art trends and specific political positions of the past, but also the politics of identifying and analyzing such relationships – in effect, the making of history. By adding a political dimension, our searches may lead us to consider the extent to which a given historical economic situation promotes a specific range of political and artistic expression. How do these modes of expression speak to each other or to the historical moment?

Assignments for this class include three short papers and a 10pp. research project. A significant portion of this class' workload comes from treasure-hunting in the University's library and museum holdings. Course readings will include novels such as For Whom the Bell Tolls (Hemingway), Pity Is Not Enough (Herbst), Jews Without Money (Gold), and 1919 (Dos Passos); news clippings, pamphlets, and other archival materials; and short theoretical pieces.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 – Making History: Radical Art and Politics, 1900-1940.

Instructor(s): John McGuigan (jmcguig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An attempt to "think historically" motivates this course, an attempt we'll engage both in theoretical terms (What can it mean to think historically?) and in practical terms (How can one do it?). In some ways, we can change the past, and do so every day – not in terms of what happened but in our understanding of it. Using the University's Labadie Collection, we'll confront these issues by exploring the complex relationship between art and politics, discovering the concrete artifacts that surround and inform twentieth-century works of literature written in America prior to World War II. In the Western world, this particularly rich period saw an explosion of oppositional art movements (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, etc.) and political movements (socialism, anarchism, fascism, etc.). Studying art works of various media alongside contemporaneous reactions and primary documents from radical political movements lets us examine not only relationships between specific art trends and specific political positions of the past, but also the politics of identifying and analyzing such relationships – in effect, the making of history. By adding a political dimension, our searches may lead us to consider the extent to which a given historical economic situation promotes a specific range of political and artistic expression. How do these modes of expression speak to each other or to the historical moment?

Assignments for this class include three short papers and a 10pp research project. A significant portion of this class' workload comes from treasure-hunting in the University's library and museum holdings. Course readings will include novels such as For Whom the Bell Tolls (Hemingway), Pity Is Not Enough (Herbst), Jews Without Money (Gold), and 1919 (Dos Passos); news clippings, pamphlets, and other archival materials; and short theoretical pieces.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 005 – The Arts of the Apocalypse.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For nearly two thousand years now, apocalyptic ideas have dominated theories about the shape of history and social experience. Up until about three centuries ago, those theories were almost exclusively focussed on God's will and ways in history. Since then, various secularizing models of historical experience have emerged, but have formed themselves deeply on the general shape of the apocalytic model. Apocalyptic ideas also have pervaded much artistic production – in poetry, in painting, in music, in drama and film. And notions of apocalypse are also deeply embedded in current discussions of the relations between Christianity and Islam.

In this course we will study first the emergence of apocalyptic ideas in Jewish, Christian, and Muslim materials, then we will follow the development of apocalyptic theories and representations in the works of such figures as Augustine, Dante, Savonarola, Botticelli, Michaelangelo, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Wagner, Verdi, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Ford.

There will be two essays for the course, and one final examination.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 006 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 318. Literary Types.

Section 001 – Satire.

Instructor(s): Mark D Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Jonathan Swift said that satire is "a sort of glass wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own." This class will widely explore the form and function of the satiric glass in all of its manifestations. While there will be no preset parameters on where this exploration will take us, we will be particularly interested in the ethical dimension of satire. One of our initial inquiries therefore will be, to what degree is satire an attempt to make right a world that the writer sees as going wrong? Beyond this there are many other issues that will take up: What is the nature of irony? How does irony differ from satire? How is it essential to it? Is parody a kind of satire? Is satire necessarily cynical, mean spirited, and destructive? What are the limitations of satire?

The reading for the course will be varied. We will begin with a consideration of a few ancient satirists, including Horace and Juvenal, and look as well at some excerpts of a few medieval satirical texts. We will next look at the role of satire in the early modern period before turning to the eighteenth century – arguably the historical high point of satire – and considering works by the Swift, Gay, and Pope, Voltaire, and others. Following this we will look to the satire produced in the United States, with a particular emphasis on the satire of the last half-century. It is hoped that throughout the semester we can also look beyond the literary texts to consider the satire in the broader culture. Therefore, please keep in mind that while we will be reading literary texts for much of the semester, we will also want to consider how satire is employed in painting, music, film, television, cartoons, magazines, and anywhere else it can be found. It is hoped that you will feel free to pursue your own interests in satire in this course and bring them to the class discussion and the papers.

This course fulfills the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 – Theatre and Social Change. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Detroit, Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Plymouth, at Henry Ford and Cooley High Schools in Detroit, or at one of four juvenile facilities.. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 – Multicultural Britain. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The idea or image of Britain as the center of a homogenous and pure culture, one reflected in a set of "island" stories untouched by the rest of the world, is perhaps one of the most persistent myths in the study of British literature, society, and culture. In this course we will attempt to question this mythology by focusing on the writing of a group of writers who, in the last twenty or thirty years, have transformed the idea of Britain by calling attention to the metropolitan, migrant, and hybrid nature of British society. By reading novels by British writers whose backgrounds or origins are to be found in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, we will try to reflect on how the new, multicultural Britain is generating narratives whose goal is nothing less than the transformation of what it means to be British. How and why did this literature become important to the body of British literature and what is its relationship to established English writing? What forms of writing do "ethnic" British writers use to examine the popular culture and lifestyle of a national culture that is being transformed by people it used to define as outsiders? To answer these questions, we will start with British "Big House" novels concerned with the crisis of Englishness at the beginning of the twentieth century (Forster's Howard's End and Waugh's Brideshead Revisted ) and their parody by the Anglo-Japanese writer Kaguro Ishoguro (Remains of the Day ). The rest of the course will focus on the multicultural novels of Diran Adebayo, Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Meera Syal, Timothy Mo, and Zadie Smith. We may also view video versions of some of the films involved in this rethinking of Britishness.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 003 – The Quest for Utopia.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the most sifnificant attempts to model an ideal society, a utopia, from Plato to the present; and then consider the primarily 20th century reaction against utopia, the dystopia. Works to be read include parts of Plato's Republic , Plutarch's account of Sparta, More's Utopia , parts of Gulliver's Travels , Bellamy's Looking Backward , Morris' News from Nowhere , and LeGuin's The Dispossessed; and, of the dystopias, part of Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground , Zamyatin's We, Huxley's Brave New World and Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. There will be a mid-term and a final exam. Class format and writing assignments will depend on the size of the class and grading support.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 004 – Literature and Revolution, 1640-1800.

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the most pervasive experiences of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is the experience of revolution. At least five major revolutions occur in this period: the English Revolution, the Glorious Revolution, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution. Each revolution is different in character from all the others, and each acquires a distinct symbolic significance of its own, in part through its representation in literature. This class will examine the literature from this period which specifically addresses the experience of revolution, in order to examine both how the experience of revolution affects literary representation, and what role literary representation plays in shaping a revolution and giving it significance. We will try to understand how literature struggles to create a language for making sense of the traumatic event which is revolution, and how the appropriation of literary or aesthetic representations can be crucial to the success or failure of revolutions. Although much of the reading for the class will be "literary," we will not be bound by such conventional genre distinctions; rather we will study a variety of different texts which speak to the experience of revolution, which express the hopes and fears of revolution, looking carefully in each case at the techniques of representation, the rhetoric, the narrative styles, the tropes of revolutionary discourse. The question that will guide us throughout is, how do the various forms of literary representation give shape and meaning to the experience of revolution?

Readings will include, but not be limited to, the following:

Hobbes, Leviathan (selections); Milton, Paradise Lost and Tenure of Kings and Magistrates; Harrington, Oceania; Locke, Second Treatise on Government (selections); Pope, Essay on Man; Pamphlets of the American Revolution (selections); Paine, Common Sense; Jefferson, Declaration of Independence; Federalist Papers (selections); Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France; Blake, America and Europe; Wordsworth, selections; Shelley, Prometheus Unbound; Scott, Waverley; Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities; Kleist, Die Verlobung in Santo Domingo.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 – Poetry.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a poetry section; we will spend the academic term, in the workshop and in tutorials, discussing the craft and techniques of verse. There will be assigned exercises, but for the most part each student will work independently to develop the voice and style(s) most congenial to his or her talent. Students will keep a journal devoted mainly to their reading of poems and essays about poetry. At least one anthology will provide opportunities for conversations about contemporary poetics. Active participation in class discussion is an essential requirement of this course. Enrollment is based on your portfolio. Students must submit a 10-15 page portfolio by noon on January 6 to 3187 AH.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, Enrollment is based on 10-15 page portfolio submission. Students must add themselves to the waitlist and then turn in a portfolio by noon on Monday, January 6th, to 3187 Angell Hall..

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Monday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003 – Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Monday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 – Fiction. Poetry.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 – The Dwarf, The Demon, The Divided Self.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "friends" for us. "Works of fiction exist in a space between the Double and the Other. To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense to transform the Other into a Double," writes Professor Paul Coates. That is, those "Others," those strangers, may, as our reading progresses, become closer and closer to resembling parts of ourselves, of our "Doubles." In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love have a father, out of "love," produce a family of freaks who we actually are intrigued with and finally can find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistenly be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 – The Dwarf, The Deamon, and The Divided Self.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "friends" for us. "Works of fiction exist in a space between the Double and the Other. To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense to transform the Other into a Double," writes Professor Paul Coates. That is, those "Others," those strangers, may, as our reading progresses, become closer and closer to resembling parts of ourselves, of our "Doubles." In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love have a father, out of "love," produce a family of freaks who we actually are intrigued with and finally can find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistenly be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003 – A Nation of Immigrants.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~merla/

Central to the myth of the American Dream is the construct of the immigrant, those "tired" and "poor," welcomed to our shores, expecting to find "streets paved with gold," and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" limited only by their own energy and desire. Not surprisingly, some of America's most compelling literature is about and by immigrants who write of the promise and disappointment of that dream and of the inevitable conflicts between old world ethics and new. This composition class will make their writings and the essays you compose in response to their ideas its focus. We will read texts by Doctorow, Gish Jen, Oscar Hijuelos, Richard Rodriguez, Brent Staples, Hong Kingston, Dubus III, Fadiman – and other professional writers – and by the writers in this class. Requirements include three 6-8 page essays, weekly writings on the readings, responses to each other's essays, active participation in class discussion, and regular attendance. attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We write well when we write about subjects that interest us. We also write well when we write about subjects in which we have a fair amount of expertise. With these ideas in mind, this course, to a large extent, will be determined by the students in it. It will, of course, have page limits, deadlines, and grades. But the class readings will be selected by the class and the paper topics will be decided by the writers (with a lot of feedback and advice from me and other members of the class). Come prepared to state your special interest(s), suggest some readings on the topic(s) from which all of us can learn and profit and propose a sequence of essay assignments for yourself and your area(s) of interest. There will be a common textbook and at least one of your reading suggestions will come from that text, but other readings may be suggested as well. Be prepared to do a lot of writing and revising of your work and to have your work reviewed by others in the class.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005 – Writing for Life: Community Writing.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upper-level English course asks that students reflect deeply and write critically about the work that they do, mostly in pairs or small groups, at a local non-profit organization. While all students will do some writing for their community partners – for instance, contribute to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, or brochure – the course emphasizes the writing and thinking that the student does about her / his community experience. Class readings / writings / discussion will focus on key issues such as our motives for taking on this work; our respective roles as insider vs. outsider; the listening, interactive, and organizational skills required; and our community partner1s often differing set of goals. In addition to sharing written observations about our community work with others in class, we will also workshop and edit as a group all of the required community assignments (i.e., the brochures, web sites, newsletter articles, etc.). Students will write weekly reflective responses, and a larger, final paper that incorporates some research about the social issues raised at their community site.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 – Technical Writing.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Technical" writing is not necessarily "scientific" writing; rather, it refers to the dissemination of knowledge that is the territory of experts or specialists. As you pursue a major, you are developing an area of expertise, becoming a specialist; thus, your work in this class will reflect your own educational and professional interests. The emphasis in technical writing is on recognizing your audience, developing a persuasive and readable voice, and writing with specificity. Discussions and assignments will include letters of application and resumes, grant proposals, informative essays, and a longer research project. We will be reading, discussing, writing (and rewriting), critiquing, and workshopping. You will find this writing-intensive class most valuable if you have a specific project on which you are ready to focus.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 008.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 009.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 340. Reading and Writing Poetry.

Section 001 – Reading and Writing Poetry: A Matter of Questions, Not Answers.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In order to obtain clues about the significance of experience, we will revel in the process of asking questions about surfaces as well as interiors. As more is revealed, the hope is that the revelations raise more questions. The goal is a chain reaction of inquiry that begins to illuminate fractions, pieces, textures, while maintaining the integrity of shadows.

We will read four volumes of poetry by as many authors, discussing the poets' strategies of poetic inquiry while developing our own. Powers of Ten is an additional text that will support our inquiry through its poetic as well as measured ways of perceiving. There will be weekly writing and reading assignments, and a creative mid-semester directed writing assessment. A final bound portfolio is also required. This requirement may be questioned as long as it is also followed.

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ENGLISH 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 – Literatures of Modernity.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In surveying British literary texts from the late 17th century to the present, this course introduces traditional period designations, such as Restoration, Romanticism, and Modernism, and details the major developments in literary genres, especially the rise of the novel. The lectures also provide an account of modernity, an important culture construction that maps directly onto the time-span marked out by this survey. Here "modernity" indicates an empowered vision of individuality's relation to sociality. This vision is by now globally dominant and sometimes tragically contested. How do we strike a balance between self-assertion and community-based identity? Do we lose ourselves in traditions or find ourselves there? How does modern literature take up these issues? Texts in several genres – drama, poetry, the novel, film – with likely authors including Etherege, Defoe, Dickens, Wilde, and Woolf. Two exams; two papers.

This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 – Satisfies the pre-1600 and pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.<

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read a representative group of dramatic works by William Shakespeare, including plays from all four genres to which he contributed: comedy, tragedy, history plays, and romance. These works have become the touchstones of all that we treasure in the western literary canon, and we will pay considerable attention to the features that have made them so, but they did not function primarily as literary artifacts in their own era. We will consider the political and social realms in which the vital and unprecedented popular theater of the Renaissance emerged, as well as the practical components of Renaissance stagecraft. A highlight of the semester will be attendance at two performances by the Royal Shakespeare Company in March and class visits by several of the RSC actors. Plays likely to be on our syllabus are: A Midsummer Night's Dream; Henry IV, Part One; The Merry Wives of Windsor; Twelfth Night; Hamlet; Coriolanus; King Lear; The Winter's Tale. Midterm, final exam, several short writing assignments.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 – Masterworks of the Middle Ages & Renaissance. Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be an intensive study of some representative masterworks of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in England. While dealing with these texts analytically, we will also explore them in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. Readings will include a substantial selection from Chaucer's Cantebury Tales [in Middle English; learn to read it and dazzle your friends], Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, some medieval plays, Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, a selection of Renaissance lyric poetry [e.g., Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell], and a Jacobean play by Jonson or Webster. We may throw in a play by Shakespeare, depending on the class' familiarity with his canon. The class, which meets 4 hours per week, will be part informal lecture [particularly when we deal with the context and background of these works] and part discussion [mostly when we focus on the texts themselves]. Each student will write two essays of approximately five pages each, a one-hour in-class essay at midterm, and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ilana M Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the beginnings of the novel and its development as a form through the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Much of our attention will be devoted to the close reading of novels by authors including Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Scott, and Austen. We will be particularly interested in the emergence of the category of "fiction": many early novels represent themselves as true histories, with novelists posing as mere "chroniclers" or "editors" of original documents. What conditions–philosophical and material–contribute to these claims? How does this relationship between fictional and historical literature develop over time and how does it continue to shape our contemporary, twenty-first century understanding of fact and fiction? Readings on these topics will be assigned.

Requirements will include informed participation, regular short papers and assignments, two essays, and a take-home final.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Simon E Dickie

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 003 – Revolution to Revolution, Literature of 18th Century Britain.

Instructor(s): Mark D Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the literature of two of the most turbulent and formative centuries in the history of the English-speaking world with a particularly keen eye on political and social change. We will begin by briefly considering key literary, political, philosophical, and religious ideas during the reign of King Charles I and the Interregnum and how they reveal the imminent tension and upheaval in English society. With transgression and rebellion as a common theme in our texts, we will begin by studying John Milton's epic Paradise Lost within the context of the English civil turmoil and read John Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel. Next, we will explore several works about colonialism in the New World, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, the fourth part of Jonathan's Swift's Gulliver's Travels and Alexander Pope's Windsor Forest. After observing the changing culture of literacy in the eighteenth century, we will read John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (a satiric, riotous play), Horace Walpole's gothic The Castle of Otranto, and Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield (a classic novel of sentiment). There will be a consideration of the link between Sentimental literature and, finally, we will read certain poems by William Blake, William Wordsworth, and other Romantics, as well as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Course work will consist of three formal papers, short weekly response papers, two exams, as well as conscientious reading, attendance, and class participation.

This course fulfills the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 004 – English Literature of the Seventeenth Century.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do English writers of the seventeenth century grapple with religious controversy, the challenges and failures of science, the pressure of an intellectual, theological, and social world in ferment? How do different literary genres give shape to these questions? What is the intersection between literary form and religious, political, and philosophical debate? What is the relation between sex and religion for writers of this period? How does the idea of Englishness work its way into concerns about form? We will ask these, and other questions throughout the semester. Readings from Francis Bacon, John Donne, Fulke-Greville, Ben Jonson, Elizabeth Cary, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, John Milton, Richard Crashaw, Thomas Carew, Margaret Cavendish, and others. Two papers (one long, one short) and a final.

This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 – Visions of Decadence.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Narrowly understood, decadence names a late 19th-century fashion craze of debauched poets. In addressing that understanding of decadence, this course also expands it to embrace works and issues throughout the last two centuries. The relevant questions for our course are broadly modern, after all, and they challenge us both to know their history and to grasp their ethical stakes. How do we use the term decadence in literary history? How about in everyday life? How are decadence and morality related? Is decadent artistry itself decadent, or does it instead throw light on society's decadence? Are there female decadents, or is the posture an overwhelmingly male one? We begin by laying conceptual groundwork with nonliterary texts by Sigmund Freud and Friedrich Nietzsche. Then we concentrate on literary texts, visual arts, and modern cinema, with authors and directors hailing from England and Europe. Beware: bring a tolerance, even an appetite, for the grotesque!

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ENGLISH 382 / AMCULT 328. Native American Literature.

Section 001 – Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theodore Chamberlin (chambert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey contemporary native American literature, taking into account the relationships between oral and written traditions that it represents, and the negotiation between native American languages and English. It will include a discussion of how assumptions about genre affect our response to native American literary texts, and whether postcolonial categories are pertinent to their interpretation. Texts will include traditional forms of native American imaginative expression, as well as works by Scott Momaday, Simon Ortiz, Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, Thomas King, Tomson Highway, Luci Tapahonso, Sherman Alexie, and others.

Assignments will include short papers, class presentations, and a final essay. There will be no final examination.

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ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm, and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

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ENGLISH 406 / LING 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory – as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English .

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ENGLISH 408 / LING 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 – Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors – Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in English 407 (reading Old English), 407 is not a prerequisite.]

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ENGLISH 414. Multimedia Explorations in the Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mmx/w03/414w03syl.htm

This course offers students the opportunity to work in groups creating and/or augmenting web-based resources for the study of a humanities topic of their choice. Students may register in groups with the mentorship of any collaborating faculty member or register singly and form partnering and, if needed, mentoring relationships. All students will study in the field of their chosen group, learn modern information technology, and use that technology to produce materials that become part of on-going resources for use by themselves and others. Reading, writing, and production requirements will be adjusted to the backgrounds of each student and the needs of each group. A typical minimum requirement is the equivalent of reading five books in the field of choice (e.g., 18th century satire or The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood), mastering at least three substantial programs (e.g., Flash or Photoshop), and producing the multimedia equivalent of 30 pages of revised, researched prose.

Note:Students must add themselves to the waitlist, and then contact the professor for permission into this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Students must add themselves to the waitlist, and then contact Prof. Rabkin for permission into this course.

ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001 – Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At the very heart of industrialization and the rise of the middle classes in Victorian England were women: anxiously made into guardians of the spiritual sanctity of the home and into devoted keepers of the family hearth, women were integral to the social and political transformations of nineteenth-century England that enabled its remarkable financial growth. The lives and writings of many Victorian women both challenge and attest to the neat enclosure of women in their homes. Through reading non-fiction prose essays, novels, household manuals, and conduct books, we will consider how Victorian women are imagined in these texts, and how these imaginings intersect with women's social history in the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-centuries. We will pay special attention to the educational, urban, and political reform projects in which women were involved over this period. The reading list will include a course pack and writings by Charlotte Bront, Mrs. Beeton, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Mrs. Humphry Ward, Alfred Tennyson, John Ruskin, and Octavia Hill.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 – Oppositional Poetics: Romantic through Contemporary. Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the relationships between the poetries/poetics of the early nineteenth century in Britain and the long process of disenchantment and secularization begun in the early modern period and persisting today in the form of postmodern critical theory. Texts include the Norton Anthology of English Lit (The Romantic Period), and, From Modernism to Postmodernism (ed. L. Cahoone), an anthology representing the foundational positions and debates that inform contemporary discussions about art, society, value, and meaning.

Requirements: several short essays on assigned topics; several longer essays, possibly linked, on topics of your choosing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 – The Poetry of Everyday Life.

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How does poetry work in the world? In individual lives and careers? In community celebrations and social occasions? In citizens' movements? In classrooms and student life? To ask these questions is to begin to explore how inspiration works and for what ends. Course goals include: working with community partners – kids in the Ann Arbor Schools on a poetry partnership and creating an exhibit and 'youth poetry night'; exploring how professional poets have used everyday speech and the everyday world; discovering how nonprofessional poets have composed poetry in diaries, letters, commonplace books, as well as for publication; investigating poetry as a form of public culture; doing original hands-on research. This project-based class is divided into four units. Each unit will introduce you to new material, new locations, new partners. Unit I: Case Study in Literary History – Poets Champion the "Real Language" of Work and Place. Unit II: Discovering the Michigan Archive-Researching the local poetry archive, making local cultural history accessible, reflecting on poetry and place. Unit III: Mitchell School Project – Working with a 4th grade class to combine the exploration of a local site with the creation and presentation of poetry and art. Unit IV: Public Eloquence-poetry as a "new public art." The class thus links historical and analytical readings with a community practicum. Requirements include attendance and participation, assigned readings, response papers, class presentations, creating a "poetry of everyday life" commonplace book, and a final project with an essay component.

Please note: Our community partnership with fourth graders thrives on the diverse talents of our class. Everyone in the class should be serious about poetry in some formperformance poetry, poetry writing, the literary history of poetry, the politics of poetry. In addition, this class is very welcoming to artists and designers, aspiring K-12 teachers, people with community service experience in schools, people with cars, people who are expert project managers, and people who are good with computers. We need you!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 – London in the Twentieth Century.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the ascendance of the American metropolis and the dissolution of the British Empire alter the image of London in the twentieth-century? This course will explore London as a site for understanding the past century's cultural and social transformations, from modernism and post-modernism in art and architecture to economic depressions, war, and increasing immigration. We will examine novels, poems, and films that use London to record and reflect upon changes in urban life across the century, and read these literary works alongside essays on the modern and post-modern city. The reading list will include a course pack and writings by E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Colin MacInnes, Muriel Spark, and Salman Rushdie. Students will be expected to turn in a substantial paper at the end of the course as well as shorter papers and bibliographies during the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 – Trials and Tragedies: The Literature of Unhappiness.

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Literature is obsessed with the question of unhappiness. Reflection on human suffering – its causes and origins, its purpose and meaning – is one of the perennial tasks of literature. Implicit in different kinds of narratives are different answers to the questions "Why do we suffer?" and "Is there any possibility for happiness?" The task of this class will be to examine a broad range of different narratives in order to determine how the very structure of a narrative provides answers to the questions about human happiness and unhappiness. From Greek tragedies to biographies of martyrs to modern novels, we will attempt to discover the very different strategies by which narratives address the problem of unhappiness, and the different assumptions such narratives make about what happiness means. Why is Greek tragedy so different from the modern novel in the way it treats suffering? What does this mean for the way we understand happiness? How does the modern novel change our understanding of happiness? These are some of the questions we will explore, trying to understand what constitutes a "tragedy" and how this is different from the innumerable narratives of trial and suffering which abound in narrative literature. In this class, we will develop a sophisticated series of strategies for analyzing narratives, and we will learn to approach from a formal or narratological perspective one of the most fundamental questions posed by literary texts: how are we to make sense of the fact of human suffering. Implicit in these narratives, and their answer to the question about human happiness, we will find an entire moral and political vision, an understanding of the individual's relation to the social world, and ultimately, an account of the meaning and purpose of human life. Finally, we will see that narrative literature transforms how we ourselves perceive our possibilities for happiness.

Readings will include, but not be limited to, the following:

Herodotus, The Persian Wars (1.30-34), Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, Sophocles, Antigone and Philoctetes, Euripides, Medea and The Bacchae, The Book of Job and selections from Genesis, Augustine, City of God (selections), Chretien de Troyes, Arthurian Romances (selections), Shakespeare, King Lear, Fox's Lives of Saints and Martyrs (selections), Milton, Paradise Lost, (selections), Bunyan, Pilgrim's Progress, Richardson, Pamela, Kafka, The Trial, Beckett, Waiting for Godot, Levi, Survival in Auschwitz, Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus .

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 – Contemporary Native American Women Writers. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read contemporary writings – novels and poetry – by Native American women. Our discussions will emphasize their influences and contributions to the politics of pan-tribal identity, culture, gender, and nation. The course is conceived as an upper-level introduction to the literature and its thematic emphases. Some of the authors we will read include Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Janice Gould, Linda Hogan. There will be one research paper (15-18 pages) due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 – Yiddish Literature in America. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes the poetry and prose written by Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and their descendents. Why and how did these authors continue to write in their native tongue after coming to the United States? How did Yiddish writers understand the process of assimilation, or attempts to combine Old World and New World myths? What themes, genres, symbols do we find in their texts? How is Yiddish literature in America both an American and a Jewish phenomenon? What is its relationship to Yiddish elsewhere? What is "American" about texts that are not written in English?

No knowledge of Yiddish is required for this course; all texts will be read in English translation. Requirements will include lively classroom participation, short response essays, and a seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 008 – William Blake: Poet and Artist. Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement and the Upper Level Writing Requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Nancy S Reinhardt (nsreinha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The poet William Blake was trained as an engraver and visual artist and wrote poetry from an early age. Many of his finest engravings illustrate works of other writers, but his most original achievement is the "illumination" of his own verse. Blake carefully designed and printed each sheet of his poetry from individual plates, surrounding his words, lines and stanzas with patterns, figures, blazing colors and full-page illustrations. The visual imagery interacts with the text, challenging the reader with multiple possibilities for interpretation. This course will question the limits of verbal/visual synthesis, the relation of Blake to his time, and his influence on modernist poets such as W.B. Yeats. Texts: Blake's Poetry and Designs, Norton Critical Edition; William Blake, The Complete Illuminated Books, ed. David Bindman. Writing Requirements: Three short papers on set topics (4-6 pages each); final seminar paper (10-12 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: enrollment restriced to Senior English concentrators

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 009 – Pacific Literary And Cultural Studies. Meets w/ American Culture 498.004.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 498.004.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 010 – Jewish and Other Differences. Meets with American Culture 498.006.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 498.006.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. Students wishing to elect this course must add themselves to the waitlist, and then bring a 10-15 page portfolio to the first class meeting.

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of English 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of English 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 003 – Persuasive Writing.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL425w03/index.html

The signers of the United States Constitution declared our freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in the United States. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. These were ordinary people doing extraordinary things with language. What about you? Do you aspire to extraordinary things, or do you simply hope to land a great job or appeal a parking ticket? Either way, you'll need to use persuasive writing. This academic term, we will increase our awareness of, respect for, and facility with persuasive writing. But our enthusiasm for and understanding of argumentative writing can grow only if we care about what we're doing (and even have some fun), so usually you will choose your own topics as we play with, analyze, and practice argumentative writing. To guide us in these challenging but rewarding enterprises, we'll use a textbook, Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students. We'll write almost daily, in the form of short exercises, rhetorical analyses, and longer essays; plan on lots of informal writing and three formal essays of 3-6 pages each. For waitlist and attendance policies, see the course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223, 323, and 423/429. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a range of novels written by writers born in the United States, whose voices help to comprise a richly textured and complex American literary canon and tradition. We will begin this course by discerning the "birth" of the "American" novel, and how nationalism aids in constructing an American literary tradition. We will interrogate via these texts how these writers define America and what it means to be an American, as well as how conceptions about America and being an American are fluid and at times contradictory when examined and read through the lens of race, class, gender and sexual preference. Likewise, we will investigate elements of these texts that are dialogic and resound loudly from text to text. Ultimately, we will wrestle with developing a working understanding of the uniqueness of American literature within the context of world literature.

Reading List Jazz -Toni Morrison; The Scarlet Letter- Nathaniel Hawthorne; The Awakening- Kate Chopin; The House of Mirth- Edith Wharton; The Sound and the Fury- William Faulkner; Loon Lake- E. L. Doctorow; Devil in a Blue Dress- Walter Mosley; House on Mango Street- Sandra Cisneros; Ceremony- Leslie Marmon Silko; Joy Luck Club- Amy Tan; The Bell Jar- Sylvia Plath; Clifford's Blues- John A. Williams.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to the mid-1940s. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel,rather than being driven primarily by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will discuss issues that repeatedly manifest themselves in these novels: how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that characterize the modern period? How do the wars of the first half of the previous century shape and deform the novels written at that time? How does this body of fiction address (and fail to address) the volatile issues associated with race and class in the first half of the twentieth century? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? Readings will include a substantial coursepack and the following texts: Gertrude Stein,Three Lives; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse, Ralph Ellison, The Invisible Man. Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam. This course has discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a broad spectrum of contemporary writers and types of fiction, As well as establishing the specific themes and narrative methods of these literary figures and groups of novels, the course also seeks to discover similar concerns, ideas, and techniques in relation to recent social and cultural developments. The course especially focuses on the possibilities and impossibilities of fiction to deal with social and individual trauma in the real worlds of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The class will read Bernard Malamud's The Assistant, Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Margaret Atwood's Surfacing, Tony Morrison's Sula, V. S. Naipaul's A Bend in the River, D.M. Thomas' The White Hotel, Don Delillo's White Noise, Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, and Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient.

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ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine some of the most significant poems and poetry movements in the period 1945-2002. We shall begin by looking at poems about World War II, and then move on to poems of the so-called Confessional school. Sylvia Plath's book Ariel and Ted Hughes' Birthday Letters will be a special focus, as well as work by the Beat Generation poets. We shall study an assortment of "canonical" as well as multicultural poems from the last two decades. The latter part of the course will feature a volume by Richard Howard, the Hopwood Lecturer for (spring) 2003 and poems about the events of Sept. 11, 2001. One short and one long paper are part of the coursework, as well as a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 444 / THTREMUS 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.001.

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ENGLISH 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 – Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama. Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Medieval drama encompasses a wide range of texts, from extremely bawdy secular literature to serious devotional plays. Some texts explore the comedy of human sexual desire, others the grotesque possibilities of the sexualized body. As we read these plays, we will come better to appreciate how literature invents sexuality. Still other texts seek to teach Christian biblical history to the laity, beginning with Creation and ending with the Last Judgment. Although the Christian Bible obviously inspires such literature, the actors speak distinctly unbiblical words, at times uttering blasphemous scatological curses, at other times mocking ecclesiastical rituals. These plays will allow us to explore the connections between serious religious aspiration and carnivalesque laughter. Throughout this course, we will discover that European culture changes significantly between the twelfth century and the sixteenth, leading to fascinating changes in definitions of both sexuality and piety.

NEW TEXT: Winter term students have an exciting additional opportunity for studying medieval drama: Professor Martin Walsh is offering a drama workshop, HUMS 485, meeting Wed. 5-7, or two credits. In this workshop, students will perform some of the plays studied in English 450. The workshop participants will present parts of plays to the English class (and perhaps elsewhere in the community).

Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two essays.ts for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 – Medieval Ways of Reading. Satisfies the pre-1600 and pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales begins in a tavern in Southwark, a seedy area of London, where a few dozen people happen to meet as they prepare for a pilgrimage to Canterbury cathedral. The pilgrims agree to enter into a tale-telling contest on the road to Canterbury, and they in fact relate twenty-three stories as they travel. This tale-telling contest allows Chaucer to experiment with diverse personas, and to exploit the potential of stories to express character. The framing fiction allows him also to represent characters' reactions to stories, to declare their own preferences in literary entertainment, and to take exception to other pilgrims' stories. Not surprisingly, there are some frictions among the pilgrims-and some open conflicts. As they proceed, telling tales and responding to tales, the pilgrims reveal diverse perspectives on the value of literature and its role in society. Some pilgrims prefer bawdy fiction; others like elevated philosophical romances. Some see fiction as a tool for making money; others view stories as a way to save souls. They tell tales in a number of genres, including romance, fabliau, saint's life, sermon, moral allegory, and tragedy. In effect, the Canterbury pilgrims become a community of readers engaged in a discussion about literature, and they reveal to us some of the values associated with literature in fourteenth-century England. Canterbury Tales, then, allows us better to understand how one medieval poet imagined literature and its role in the world, and how he imagined an audience responding to his texts. Course requirements: active participation in discussions and oral readings, passage translations, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 469. Milton.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, will be devoted to reading closely the poetry and prose of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet, amid the various intellectual and social current of the seventeenth century. Milton is a writer with whom almost every subsequent generation of English writers has had to deal, for better and worse, and his reputation has fallen and risen as political, social, and aesthetic ideals have changed. Milton's impassioned efforts to address the ills of his day entailed contradictions that are still very much with us: he was apolitical who was willing to endorse authoritarian methods to accomplish liberal goals; he was a devout believer in meritocracy who rarely felt this belief threaten an inherited if incorrigible misogyny; he was the epic narrator of the War in Heaven who felt that military valor had nothing to do with true virtue. Milton also wrote some of the most sublime poetry available in English about the joys of the natural world, about the deeply embodied pleasures of eating and sex, and about human relationships. We will be particularly interested in how Milton's political career reverberates throughout the poetry – the ways, for example, that his experience as a defender of regicide may have influenced his portrait of Satan's rebellion against a resolutely monarchical God. We will also look at how political defeat produced a radically inward reorientation of Milton's ardent political and spiritual aspirations. We will spend the lion's share of our time in an intensive reading of Paradise Lost, but will also read some of the early poetry and prose as well as Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained. Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a mid-term, and a final exam.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – American Literature to 1830. Satisfies the American Literature and the pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature and intellectual history of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the descriptions of New World nature and peoples by marvelling Spanish and English explorers and conquerors, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the American colonies and around the Atlantic rim, a seduction novel, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American character, form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. There will be three short papers and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – Thought, Deed, and the Written Word: American Selves.

Instructor(s): Maria V Sanchez (maricarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we know what an individual is, or who counts as one? This class will study the development of individualism in the United States through readings of a wide variety of 19th century texts (with a possible quick nod to the 20th century toward the end of the term). We'll begin by looking at different strains of individualism, roughly divided into those that privilege thought (interiority, self-identity, self-knowledge), and those that privilege deed (social status, occupation or profession, action); all the while, we'll consider the role of writing, and the vital importance of the written word, to how Americans come to understand individualism. How do slaves, for example, achieve individuality, when they are defined as 3/5 of a one person for purposes of congressional apportionment? How do the century's changing ideas concerning gender roles, "Americanness," immigration and imperialism, theoretical class fluidity, and so on, affect how we define an individual? Our authors may include: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Zitkala-Sa, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Wilson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Elizabeth Stoddard.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – Multilingual U.S. Narratives: Asian American, Latino/a, Jewish, and African American Vernacular Cultures. Satisfies the American Literature and New Tradtions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take a comparative approach to the study of multi-ethnic American cultures. As we trace African American, Asian American, Jewish, and Latino/a literature from the 1920s through the present day, we will discuss the stylistics and politics of multilingual American literatures. While the canon of U.S. literature has grown considerably more multicultural in recent years, it has not grown noticeably multilingual. We'll discuss the resistance to non-English and non-"standard" English cultures in the U.S. as well as the rich legacy of vernacular narratives that have argued for a more inclusive conceptualization of American languages and identity.

There are no language prerequisites for this course. The readings will include novels by Zora Neale Hurston, Carlos Bulosan, Henry Roth, Américo Paredes, John Okada, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Jessica Hagedorn, as well as films by Ang Lee and John Sayles.

Requirements for this course include short essays (2-3p.) and one final essay (10-12p.), in addition to informed participation and occasional quizzes. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class time. For attendance and waitlist policies, see course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 – The Environmental Imagination in American Literature.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will look at how the various environments of North America have been imagined from the time of Spanish contact up through the end of the twentieth century. A section will be devoted to each of the following places/concepts: the tropics, the wilderness, the desert, the river, the swamp and the farm. In each section, we will pursue the treatment of place from different historic moments and social perspectives. For the tropics, for example, we will read Columbus, Sir Walter Raleigh, and Andrew Marvell on European anticipations of an earthly paradise as well as the contemporary Caribbean poet, Derek Walcott, on landscape-centered meditations of colonial history and pastoral dreaming. For the swamp, we will read an eighteenth-century Virginia wit's rendition of this landscape as a place in which Enlightenment ideas of improvement and sociability are overwhelmed, nineteenth-century narrative and painterly associations of swamps with escaped slaves, and Jim Jarmusch's recent film comedy about escaped convicts and innocents, Down By Law. There will be one short and one long paper as well as an in-class presentation and an ongoing creative meditation on an environment of your choice.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement and the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 478 / CAAS 476. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 – Black Narrative and the Politics of Mobility. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

African American writers and intellectuals have always contemplated the impact of (in)voluntary travel on ideas of self and community by using literature to address the following: slaves and slave traders traversing the dreaded Middle Passage; black soldiers serving in wars of territorial and political expansion; black missionaries, merchants and colonists in Africa, the Middle East, and southeast Asia; black "tourists" in Europe, the Caribbean and Canada; black migrants within the US traveling from South to North or westward into "new" territories. Looking broadly at travel narratives, poetry, novels, and autobiography, this course will address the following questions: 1) How do we analyze the different sub-categories of travel writing black writers have appropriated, reformulated or invented? 2) What roles do gender, class and ethnicity play in shaping the way African American authors represent the challenges and possibilities of black mobility? 3) Given the continually evolving question of what constitutes an "American," how have encounters with peoples of other regions/nationalities (especially other peoples of the African Diaspora) influenced the artistic and national vision of African Americans writing on this side of the "black Atlantic?"

Course load: students have to do a take-home midterm, an in-class end-of term of exam, a paper, and a short presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 479 / CAAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 – The Slave Narrative. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 274 and CAAS 201 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the early emergence and development of the autobiographical slave narrative, a central genre in the African American literary tradition. Through close readings of familiar and less familiar narratives – Jea, Equiano, Douglass, Truth and Jacobs, for example – we will consider the ways in which former slaves' representations of slavery both referred to and shaped the northern abolitionist contexts in which they were embedded. What opportunities did the slave's narrative offer previously excluded black voices for representing their lives, as well as their ideas on equality and freedom? Under what constraints did these former slaves labor as they penned their way into the North's public conscience? In conjunction with our close study of these various autobiographies, we will read a wide range of historical and theoretical texts to help us critically interrogate the assumptions about race, history and literature that readers, both antebellum and modern-day, have brought to their interpretations of these texts of survival. Requirements include intensive reading and participation, student-led discussion and presentations, one critical essay, midterm and end of term exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 – Salman Rushdie: A Literary and Cultural Examination.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with most of Salman Rushdie's major novels. It is also to examine the politics of the controversy surrounding the death sentence. In our reading of the novels we will be concerned with formal issues as well as thematic ones. In our discussion of the cultural politics of the death sentence, we will examine the way in which Rushdie has become a symbol of the Muslim World's encounter with the West, and the ways in which diaspora and minority politics have played themselves out in this collision. Texts include Rushdie's major novels from Midnight's Children to the The Moor's Last Sigh, Imaginary Homelands and selections from Rushdie's latest collection of essays. Possible readings from William Blake, Angela Carter, and Hanif Kureishi. This will be a difficult and rigorous course, with a large amount of reading. Two essays, one long and one short. Several short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 – Jane Austen in Context.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will do a careful reading of Austen's six major novels along with (a) some of the novels by women of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century that she herself read; (b) other kinds of writings about women from Austen's era, such as feminist and anti-feminist tracts, conduct books, and letters; (c) selected essays in social and cultural history. We will also view and discuss one or two of the recent film versions of her novels, in order to explore what Jane Austen means in our context as well as her own. Texts will be Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion; Burney, Evelina, Wollstonecraft, Maria and/or A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest; plus a course pack. The class will combine lively lectures and livelier discussion; students will write one paper, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final. NOTE: the reading for this course will be heavy; students might want to read Frances Burney's Evelina (Oxford UP) over winter break.

This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 – Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 002 – The Plays of the Royal Residency.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This one-credit hour course will present an analysis of the plays which the Royal Shakespeare Company will perform this Winter Term (2003) during their residency at the University of Michigan. The course will meet on Monday evenings throughout the term, and consider, in order, the stage adaptation of Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, and two plays of Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Coriolanus." The course will involve some guest lecturers, including some members of the Royal Shakespeare Company. It is strongly urged that all take advantage of the opportunity to view the three plays. To that end, those enrolled in the course will be eligible to purchase tickets at reduced cost.

The course is set for Monday evening in order to allow not only students at the University, but people from Ann Arbor and the wider community to attend. Such visitors are welcome, with no registration required. If they identify themselves in advance through an email (fiesole@umich.edu), I will try to see that there are sufficient copies of texts available for reading.

For students enrolled, there will be one essay assigned, and a final examination of one hour.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 – Rhetoric & the Achievement of Women's Rights. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can – and does – change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Work for the course includes class participation, quizzes, and two exams. For waitlist and attendance policies, visit the course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 – Imitation and Inspiration: The History of the Short Story.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This survey of the history of short fiction will consider work by Gogol, Turgenev, Poe, Kafka, Borges, Chekhov, Maupassant, Babel, Anderson, Mansfield, Colette, Joyce, Hemingway, Mishima and O'Connor. We'll trace the historical development of the short story form with particular attention to the issue of influence: how some of these writers influenced each other, and how they might continue to influence writers today. Students will write regular brief exercises imitating the style/technique of the writers discussed as well as 2-3 essays or stories responding to/inspired by the works considered.

Required Text: Course pack

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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