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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Great Books


This page was created at 2:47 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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GTBOOKS 192. Great Books.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): H Don Cameron , Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors first-year students only. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Great Books 191, from Plato to the Renaissance. We will read Plato, Symposium and Republic; Vergil, The Aeneid ; selections from the Old Testament and New Testament; St. Augustine, Confessions; Dante, The Divine Comedy, (Inferno, and selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso); and selections from Boccaccio. Great Books 192 is open only to first-year students in the Honors Program; other students wishing to take a similar course are encouraged to elect Great Books 202.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 202. Great Books of the Medieval and Modern World.

Section 001 Athens and Jerusalem in Great Books of the Western World.

Instructor(s): Robert D Wallin (rdwallin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read, discuss, and write about ten or so of the (mostly shorter) classics of Western literature. Written for the most part for audiences with backgrounds and expectations widely different from our own, these books have preserved their value and importance with ease. Because they force us to consider important questions and values, because they make us think about the kinds of persons we are or want to be, these books are as much our heritage as are the rules of arithmetic. I want you to become comfortable reading these books and eager to use them in forming your own education.

The terms Athens and Jerusalem in the course subtitle refer to the two famous cities and the distinctive ways of looking at and understanding the world that developed in each. One way, we might say, is the way of philosophy and science, the other the way of Scripture and its insights. One way can be considered Greco-Roman, the other Judeo-Christian. The ways of Athens and Jerusalem are fundamental to the structure of the Western mind and its civilization.

We will begin with some background reading. Vergil's Roman epic, The Aeneid, and the New Testament Gospels of Mark and Matthew will serve to ground us, and then we will proceed to examine two or three of Paul's Letters. From the Bible we will move on to Augustine's Confessions and Dante's Inferno. We will then consider three works of the Renaissance, More's Utopia, Machiavelli's The Prince, , and Shakespeare's Hamlet. From the 18th century we will read Voltaire's Candide , from the 19th Goethe's Faust, Part One, and from the 20th Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

Our conversation about and with these greats will include about ten pages of writing in a few shortish papers, a few brief quizzes and a midterm (or perhaps two), and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 222 / ASIAN 222. Great Books of Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Ramirez-Christensen

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the great works of literature that have exerted a determining influence on the lives and culture of the Japanese from ancient times to the present. Readings include selections from women's writing, from Lady Murasaki's monumental eleventh-century novel, The Tale of Genji, to various stories about the female condition in the modern world; medieval Buddhist-inspired essays on the ethos and aesthetics of daily life; a fascinating tract on death, heroism, and the way of the samurai; popular group poetry from renga, haikai, and Bashô's haiku; and modern fiction from Sôseki, Ibuse, and Nobel-prize winners Kawabata and Ôe. Discussions will focus on the human and cultural values inscribed in the works, particularly as seen from a comparative East/West perspective and the problematics of Japanese modernity. Because all texts are in English translation, no knowledge of Japanese is required. Course work consists of brief written assignments and two longer papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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