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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 2:49 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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LING 102. First Year Seminar (Humanities).

Section 001 – Language and Mind.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is the human mind? What is knowledge? What do you know that enables you to translate the squiggly marks you are now reading, into meanings? What's a meaning? In this course, we will explore research into one of the richest, most extensively investigated, and uniquely human components of the mind – language – to attempt answers to these kinds of questions. We will investigate the place of linguistics, construed as a theory of human linguistic knowledge representation, within the cognitive sciences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 102. First Year Seminar (Humanities).

Section 002 – What Miss Fidditch Didn't Teach You: The Facts about English Grammar and Usage.

Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

English is an analytic language, with few affixes (‘endings') or paradigms; English grammar is largely a matter of arranging separate words together in complex constructions. This is called syntax, whereas the arrays of verbs and nouns in paradigms (amo, amas, amat; hic, haec, hoc) are characteristic of morphology, which is far more prominent than syntax in the grammar of synthetic languages like Latin, French, Spanish, Russian, or German.

Unfortunately for English, the traditional accounts of its grammar that are familiar to us today were constructed centuries ago on a synthetic model, by people for whom Greek and Latin were second nature; such grammars are therefore a poor fit for the realities of English syntax, especially for modern speakers unfamiliar with Greek and Latin morphology.

Consequently few people get any use out of traditional grammar, except, for a few, in criticizing someone else's speech or writing. This fact goes a long way toward explaining why so many people dislike English grammar, so few actually study it, and practically nobody knows it well. Grammar is notorious as the driest, dullest, and most irrelevant subject there is, and everyone would like to be shut of it. Luckily, this is not true.

English syntax can, in fact, be explored profitably without reference to traditional grammar, just by analyzing utterances and discovering the patterns that they form. This course will be concerned with the actual facts of English sentence and phrase structure, starting from the ground up. We will take sentences from everywhere, take them apart to see how they work, and construct new ones according to the rules they follow, discovering in the process just how far the rules can be extended. For instance, from the sentences "My brother knew the man", "The man bought the horse", and "The horse died" one can construct "The horse the man bought died" and "The man my brother knew bought the horse", but not "*The horse the man my brother knew bought died." There is a reason for this. Or, if I know Bill has a brother who lives in another city, I can ask "What city does Bill's brother live in?", but not "*What city does Bill have a brother who lives in?" Again, there is a reason.

Assignments will include analysis problems based on the syntactic structures used by J.K. Rowling in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets; two papers on various topics, and a term paper or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 103. First Year Seminar (Social Science).

Section 001 – Endangered Languages.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

By one expert's estimate, 90% of today's 6,000 living languages will vanish before the end of this century. This course explores the topic of language endangerment and language death, focusing on such questions as these:

  • Why and how do languages die?
  • How do communities react to the imminent death of their heritage languages?
  • Why do linguists believe that each instance of language death closes one more window onto the workings of the human mind?
  • What (if anything) can be done to save an endangered language?

This is not a lecture course: students will be expected to contribute actively to class discussions, and to investigate the topics beyond the small set of core readings. The main written requirement will be a term paper, which could be either an individual project or a team project. Grading will be divided between preparation for and participation in class discussions and the term paper.

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LING 151. Elementary American Sign Language II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paula D Berwanger (pberwang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 150. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of LING 150. Students will continue to learn to use and recognize selected grammatical structures of American Sign Language (ASL) for use in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics. Additional vocabulary is introduced to expand students' communicative skills in ASL conversations. Students also will learn additional ways of forming questions in ASL to enhance skills in using and recognizing a variety of ASL structures. Upon completion of Linguistics 151, students will be able to observe basic courtesies while making introductions, giving directions, and conversing about past, present, and future events in ASL. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes role playing in selected situational activities. Class will meet two days, two hours a day.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 210. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Nothing is more distinctly human than our ability to use language. Because of that, we expect that the study of language can provide insight into "human nature." This course is an analytic introduction to the methods linguists use for describing languages (although general training in analytic thought is our ultimate goal). Drawing on examples from a large number of the world's languages, we will look at the sounds of language, how they are produced and how they pattern into words; we will study the diverse ways in which individual languages approach processes of word and sentence formation, while we ask whether there are processes universal to all languages. By focusing simultaneously on language data and on the techniques used by linguists to make sense of these data, we will see that our understanding of the object of inquiry (language) is influenced by our methods of inquiry. Requirements include problem-solving assignments, midterm and final exams; no prerequisites except an interest in language and thinking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 211. Introduction to Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu) , Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From time immemorial human beings have been curious about what appears to be a uniquely human possession, human language – about its structure, its diversity, its use, and its effects on others. This course explores the human capacity for language. We begin with a discussion of the uniqueness of human language and then review major aspects of language structure common to all human languages: sound systems, words and their meanings, sentence structures and meaning. We will then examine child language development, speech perception, and language change; finally, we will extend our results to discussions of language variation, including social and political attitudes toward language (for instance, what is "Standard English", and is it better than other dialects of English? And should English become the official national language of the United States?). Course requirements include regular homework assignments, one midterm exam, and a final exam.

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LING 251. Intermediate American Sign Language II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paula D Berwanger (pberwang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 250. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will continue to learn communicative structures of American Sign Language (ASL) and develop further skills in the use of physical space to recognize and express various meanings. Vocabulary and idiomatic expressions will be expanded to cover increasingly varied settings. Students completing LING 251 will be able to communicate in ASL in a range of conversational interactions. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes situational role playing and class presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 272 / ANTHRCUL 272. Language in Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 272.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 305. Advertising Rhetoric.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers how verbal and visual advertising messages are interpreted by consumers in a cultural context. 40% of the course is spent on analysis of familiar products and services such as cars, diamonds, and banks. Consumers typically have contradictory desires regarding such products (e.g., a car should be roomy yet compact, and sporty yet comfortable). This is further complicated by the ambivalent attitude of audiences to advertising communications in general. Another 40% of the course is spent showing how this rhetorical framework accounts for the deployment of formal resources, such as photographic styles and typeface selections, in magazine ads. The remaining 20% is spent in creative competitions where small groups of students design semi-finished magazine ad drafts. No artistic experience is expected, and the course is not open to students from the School of Art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 313. Sound Patterns.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): José R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores two fundamental aspects of the sounds of human languages: speech sounds as physical entities (phonetics) and speech sounds as linguistic units (phonology). In viewing sounds as physical elements, the focus is articulatory descriptions: How are speech sounds made? What types of articulatory movements and configurations are used to differentiate sounds in the world's languages? In this part of the course, the goal is to learn to produce, transcribe, and describe in articulatory terms many of the sounds known to occur in human languages. In the next part of the course, the focus is on sounds as members of a particular linguistic system. Phonological data from a wide range of languages are analyzed – that is, regularities or patterns in sound distribution are extracted from the data set and then stated within a formal phonological framework. We will also construct arguments to support the proposed analyses, and will find that phonetic factors play a crucial role in validating phonological analyses. Throughout the course, a major emphasis is that speech sounds are simultaneously physical and linguistic elements, and that these two aspects of sound structure are interdependent. Class sessions will consist of lectures, phonetic practice, and discussion of phonological data sets. Course grades will be based on weekly assignments, midterm, and take-home final exam. LING 210, 211, 411, or permission of instructor is required to take the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 315. Introduction to Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the syntax (sentence structural properties) of human language. First, it takes into account the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. Second, it explores in detail the fact that different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past, share many structural properties. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words – 'who', 'what' and so on – as most languages do). In order to explain these and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Arabic or Korean as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to.

It is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in a couple of paragraphs (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say 'Who do you like?' in English, instead of 'You like who?', a word order that one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language – which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task – can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience.

Course requirements include (bi-)weekly assignments, a midterm and a final exam.

Required Coursebook: Carnie, A. 2002. Syntax: A Generative Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 316(314). Aspects of Meaning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter J Hallman (hallman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces the elementary components of a theory of meaning for human language. The theory of meaning explored here is "truth-functional," meaning we are taking the approach that the function of language is basically classificational – linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case. The components we will study in detail are predicate and propositional logic, models and the reference of nouns, pronouns and predicates, and the meanings of quantifiers. We will also discuss lexical semantics and types of events as well as topics in discourse pragmatics such as types of anaphora and the topic/focus distinction. Most of the issues we will explore in this course revolve broadly around the relationship between the structure of linguistic expressions (their syntax) and their meaning.

Textbook: Introduction to Natural Language Semantics by Henriette de Swart. CSLI Publications, Stanford, California, 1998. ISBN 1-57586-138-0.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 318. Types of Languages.

Section 001 – Meets with Linguistics 518.001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 518. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/lingw97.html

Human languages, especially those spoken by members of unfamiliar and distant cultures, appear on the surface to be very different from one another. But closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence, seeking explanations where possible in the communicative function of language as well as in the historical evolution of languages. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principle findings of contemporary typological research.

Coursework will consist of:

  1. readings and lectures on the major categories and parameters which are used to define language types,
  2. the completion of a number of short assignments or reports on given phenomena as they are manifested in the languages that students will adopt,
  3. discussion and comparison of these individual findings in class,
  4. a midterm exam, and
  5. a course paper examining a particular typological parameter in one or more languages.

Toward the end of the course students will make a ten minute oral presentation to the class of a pre-final version of their term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 340. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines language as a social phenomenon, focusing on the ways in which variation in language form and use can enhance our understanding of social processes. The course will give an overview of various approaches and issues related to the role of language in society. In studying language variation, we will see how a person's background and identity shape the ways in which they speak and they ways in which they perceive the speech of others. Topics related to these questions include the following: quantitative approaches to language variation and change; registers (varieties tied to particular contexts; and various regional, social, and ethnic varieties of English (including African American English); relationships between language and gender; social and cultural issues associated with signed languages. The course will also consider social dimensions of bilingualism, multilingualism, diglossia, and code-switching. We will look at the effects of language contact situations, including the emergence and structure of pidgin and Creole languages, the process of language death, and attempts to preserve and maintain minority languages. Finally, we will examine the relationship between language and power, with particular attention to language planning and language standardization. In the course of this discussion we will examine some educational and political issues which are raised by a sociolinguistic analysis.

Text: Introducing Sociolinguistics by Rajend Mesthrie, Joan Swann, Andrea Deumert, and William Leap.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 345. Languages and Peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia and the Caucasus.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a brief acquaintance with 150 languages and peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia, and Caucasus – "a mountain of languages."

Topics will include:

  • Spread of the Russian language in Siberia, Caucasus, and Central Asia, as compared with the expansion of English in America
  • Russification policy in the former Soviet Union
  • Languages of Eastern Europe and Russia under dictatorship
  • Language as a weapon: forbidden books, songs, and anecdotes as a tool which ultimately brought down the Communist system in Eastern Europe and Russia
  • Cultural differences between peoples speaking different languages
  • National character as seen through the language: differences in the meaning of the words FREEDOM, FRIENDSHIP, EMOTION in Russian and in English
  • Russian and East European languages today: a massive borrowing from American English
  • Recent achievements in language study in Russia and Eastern Europe.

Specialists in the area as well as singers of native songs will be invited. Several video films will be shown. Students will be evaluated by their discussion in class, as well as by their written homework.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 351. Second Language Acquisition.

Section 001 – Meets with Ling 551.001.

Instructor(s): Judy A Dyer (jdyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory course will focus on theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to second language development and teaching. The course will cover some of the major topics within second language acquisition research and will provide students with experience in data analysis and interpretation. While much of the literature focuses on the acquisition of English, examples and analysis of other language data will be discussed. The course is intended for all students interested in understanding and evaluating proposed models of second language acquisition.

Undergraduates should register for LING 351 and graduates for LING 551. Both courses will meet together with additional work for LING 551 credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 370(410) / ANTHRCUL 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the role of language attitudes in maintaining (often unrecognized) forms of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, and national or regional origin. We examine the interplay between language and ideological processes which function below the level of consciousness, particularly the ways in which prejudice towards particular varieties of English (as well as towards other languages) plays a role in racial discrimination. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted, idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogeneous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle-class American mainstream and often assumed to be the only "correct" way of speaking American English. Many people depend on standard language ideology without ever examining or even being aware of the assumptions it entails. In this course, we will look into those assumptions, which are both linguistic and social. We will examine the ways in which prejudiced views about language are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, the business community, and the judicial system. The effect of the standard language ideology and the practices of these institutions is to suppress perfectly functional language variation through the hegemonic assumption that there is a "correct" way to speak English and that all Americans must learn to speak English in a particular way. This course should be of interest to those interested in linguistics, anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, law, and education. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 385. Experiential Practice.

Section 001 – [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students participate in a service project or projects that draw on their knowledge of linguistics. In addition, we will meet as a seminar that complements the placement. Some weeks the seminar will meet as a whole group to discuss readings relevant to your projects or to discuss general issues that arise in the course of your work. In the past project sites have included:

Some of these are daytime opportunities and some are after school and evening.

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LING 395. Individual Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Adequately prepared students can pursue individual research with a member of the faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 406 / ENGLISH 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 406.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 408 / ENGLISH 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 – Satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 408.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

LING 429. Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 313, 314, or 315. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are the connections between language, linguistics, and language teaching materials? In particular, how can the recent advances in discourse analysis and corpus linguistics be built into tasks and exercises? This practical course is designed to give participants training in the processes of collecting authentic language data, analyzing that data, and converting it into appropriate pedagogical formats.

Although the main focus of illustration will be ESL, every effort will be made to accommodate other interests. There will be one or two guest speakers, and use will be made of the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE). The course text is Guy Cook "Discourse Analysis", available at Shaman Drum. Other materials will be on reserve at the Linguistics/ELI Library.

Assessed work will consist of a number of shorter exercises and a final major project (group or individual). Graduate students will also produce a short academic paper.

Toward the end of the academic term, we will round off the course with a mini-conference in the English Language Institute, where the final projects will reappear in either presentation or poster format!

Inquiries to jmswales@umich.edu.

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LING 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 – Text-to-Speech Synthesis. Meets with Linguistics 792.001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces basic techniques in text-to-speech synthesis. We will use the di-phone approach and the PSOLA technique, with a focus on the implementation of prosody and hands-on skills.

Prerequisite: Some knowledge of phonetics and phonology, and some knowledge of (or willingness to learn) programming.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 – Corpus Linguistics.

Instructor(s): Rita Carol Simpson (ritacsim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Computerized corpora of many languages have proliferated in recent years, providing linguists and language teachers access to large quantities of written and spoken data. Corpus linguistics is a method for analyzing and exploiting such data using computer tools. This course will be a general introduction to corpus linguistics for students interested in empirical investigations of language and in the use of computers for linguistic analysis. The course will include a fair amount of hands-on work to familiarize students with different corpora and text analysis programs. Major themes of the course will be building corpora (of both written and spoken language), techniques and tools used in corpus analysis, corpus-based descriptions of English, and quantitative approaches to empirical research in linguistics. We will also discuss the applications of corpus-based methods in a variety of linguistic subfields, including discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, syntax, historical linguistics, language acquisition, natural language processing, language teaching, and translation studies. Throughout the class we will consider the questions of what linguistic phenomena computers are best suited for, and how we can best use computer tools to enhance our analytical skills. Students wishing to use this course as contributing to the "ESL sub-concentration" Certificate will undertake a more applied suite of assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 – Language & Socialization. Meets with Anthro 458.002, Psych 551.244, Psych 457.001, Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek , Marilyn J Shatz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 494. Undergraduate Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 495. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 496. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 505. Rhetoric.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course's objective is to understand how "rhetors" such as political leaders use language and imagery to impress, influence, and persuade a general public. Primary objects of analysis are speeches and debates. We show how successful rhetorical events tap into collective memories of prior events (literary and historical). We begin with the ancient world (the Iliad, Cicero), jump to Shakespeare and Milton, then consider a chronological sequence of American speeches from Washington to the present. Orations by Lincoln and M. L. King Jr. are closely studied in cultural and political context. Debates from Lincoln-Douglas to Gore-Perot are then analysed. Satire and standup comedy are briefly considered as rhetorical forms. Theoretical readings include treatises of Aristotle and Cicero, along with modern writers such as Robert Hariman ("Political Styles") and Kenneth Burke. However, the emphasis is on open-ended textual analysis rather than on philosophical reflection. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 313. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic.

Prerequisite: LING 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 514. Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter J Hallman (hallman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 314. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces three tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The three tools are: predicate and propositional logic, generalized quantifier theory, and type theory. These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational – linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case.

With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics including the relation between syntax and semantics (compositionality), the scope of quantifiers, quantifier types, monotonicity, conservativity, presuppositionality, intensionality, event types, and types of anaphora.

Textbook: Introduction to Natural Language Semantics by Henriette de Swart. CSLI Publications, Stanford, California, 1998. ISBN 1-57586-138-0.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 518. Linguistic Typology.

Section 001 – Meets with Linguistics 318.001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 318. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/lingw97.html

Human languages, especially those spoken by members of unfamiliar and distant cultures, appear on the surface to be very different from one another. But closer examination reveals that languages differ in systematic ways and that more than half of them can be divided into a relatively small number of basic types. In this course we will identify and study some of these basic patterns and explore possible reasons for their existence, seeking explanations where possible in the communicative function of language as well as in the historical evolution of languages. The course will introduce students to basic grammatical structure and function by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principle findings of contemporary typological research.

Coursework will consist of:

  1. readings and lectures on the major categories and parameters which are used to define language types,
  2. the completion of a number of short assignments or reports on given phenomena as they are manifested in the languages that students will adopt,
  3. discussion and comparison of these individual findings in class,
  4. a midterm exam, and
  5. a course paper examining a particular typological parameter in one or more languages.

Toward the end of the course students will make a ten minute oral presentation to the class of a pre-final version of their term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 519. Discourse Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a graduate level introduction to the analysis of discourse, both spoken and written. Major approaches to the analysis of texts will be examined both for their historical underpinnings as well as their major assumptions. Although it has no prerequisites, it is desirable for students to have some prior knowledge of the language of linguistics. Because this is a seminar format, a high level of student participation is expected. Course assignments include regular conversation papers, analysis of some data sets, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for LING.


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