Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 3:03 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, written and oral exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 103. SPANISH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed SPANISH 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in SPANISH 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect SPANISH 103 if they have completed the equivalent of SPANISH 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 102. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing SPANISH 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 112 or 230. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:

  • Visión y Voz, Galloway-Labarca (Wiley). (Students placed in 231 have the option to buy the customized version for SPANISH 231 that contains only the last two units of the book, workbook and laboratory manual).
  • SPANISH 231. Course pack. Primis custom publishing (McGraw-Hill Co.)
  • Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course, and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials.

Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

TEXTS:

  1. Required:

    • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Course pack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments
  2. Recommended:

    • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of six cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the three required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
    • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
    • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. A maximum of two courses of SPANISH 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Text: Course pack. Part 1 at Excel (1117 South University); Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 290 / AMCULT 224. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Constanza Svidler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses the particular linguistic needs and interests of students of Hispanic descent and heritage born and/or educated in the United States interested in acquiring a formal and structural knowledge of Spanish, in further expanding vocabulary at the abstract and professional levels, and in developing their skills in formal and professional writing. Sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States code-switching, linguistic attitudes, bilingualism also will be explored in relation to the politics of cultural identity. Short weekly assignments and exercises emphasizing the differences between oral and written modes of communication and between formal and informal Spanish will be required, along with a midterm and final exam. Readings will include cultural essays, literatures, and scholarly articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 Legal Spanish.

Instructor(s): Betina Schlossberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Spanish for Legal Professionals

The course will include language tools, functions, and notions necessary to move in the Hispanic Legal World. The goal will be to introduce students to the different areas of the Legal studies from a Hispanic perspective. For that purpose the following will be considered in class: Roman System vs. Common Law System, Business Law, Criminal Law, Family Law, International Law, and other matters related to legal affairs.

Students are expected to participate in discussions, case studies, and in business and legal writing.

Students will be evaluated through class participation, written assignments, a group project, and a mid-term exam and a final exam.

Materials will be handed to students or posted in Coursetools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 002, 003 Business Spanish.

Instructor(s): Maria De Lourdes Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Business Spanish 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the course is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 310. Advanced Composition and Style.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberly S Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students in this course will acquire an advanced understanding of grammatical structures while further developing their writing skills in Spanish. They will engage in extensive writing practice using a process approach that involves successive revisions. In addition, students will acquire research skills and learn strategies for writing description, narrative, and argumentative essays. Course requirements: three essays, three exams, research paper. Course conducted in Spanish. Intended audience: Spanish concentrators and other students with significant training in Spanish language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 313. Discussion of Current Issues in Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Topic?

Instructor(s): Monika A Szumilak

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Dennis D Pollard

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While introducing students to the literary production of the Spanish-speaking world, this course examines the questions: What is literature? And what is literature for? What possibilities does it offer for exploring the questions that perplex us, be they psychological, social, political, or philosophical questions? The texts we will read including narrative, drama, poetry, and film are drawn from various countries in the Spanish-speaking world. Each of these texts responds specifically to its cultural and historical context while also eliciting responses from its readers, who may read from quite different cultural and historical standpoints. How do these texts expand our understanding of other cultures as well as our own? How do they enable us to rethink the world we inhabit by imagining other worlds? Students will examine these questions while also learning basic techniques of literary analysis and further developing their speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. The course is designed to meet the needs of those who are learning Spanish as a second language, as well as native speakers who are interested in a basic introduction to Hispanic Literatures.

Active oral participation (through discussions and group presentations) is an important component of the course. Written assignments will include interpretive-analytic essays on each genre (narrative, drama, poetry, film). Testing will consist either of a series of short quizzes or two exams (to be decided by each instructor). Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 005 Topic?

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia Santo-Tomas (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 335. Contemporary Spanish and Spanish-American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Realism in Modern Spain (Nineteenth and Twentieth Century).

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor (moreiras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will analyze the concept of Realism as one of the most influential modes of representing reality during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century in Spain. We will examine both the theory and practice of realist literary texts written by authors such as Benito Pérez Galdós, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo 'Alas' Clarín, Pío Baroja, Camilo José Cela, Ramón J. Sender, Juan Goytisolo, among others. Taught in Spanish.

Evaluation will be based on several short papers, participation, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso presenta una introducción a la cultura de América Latina desde la etapa pre-colombina hasta el momento actual, prestando atención a elementos históricos, populares, literarios y artísticos por medio de lecturas, películas, documentales, programas de TV y música. Siguiendo algunas de las propuestas ideológicas sobre las Américas surgidas a partir de las celebraciones del Quinto Centenario del Descubrimiento (1492-1992), se estudiarán las condiciones sociales y políticas de América Latina hoy, mediante el análisis de eventos políticos, manifestaciones artísticas, iconos de cultura popular y literatura. Los estudiantes escribirán regularmente en español breves composiciones sobre temas pertinentes a los materiales de clase manteniendo un diario durante el curso.

Los estudiantes asistirán a una conferencia semanal y participarán en dos sesiones semanales de discusión en grupos reducidos. Asimismo los estudiantes participarán en tres debates sobre temas cruciales y controvertidos sobre América Latina.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 350. Independent Studies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Aspects of the Spanish Civil War in Film, Literature, and Documents.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Spanish Civil War is considered by many the critical event of the first part of the 20th century. The struggle between democracy and authoritarian conceptions of government anticipates the larger struggle that came about with World War II. Spain was the battleground of three competing ideologies: democracy, facism, and communism. In the process, Spain was physically destroyed and politically and culturally marginalized.

This course will deal with the Civil War and its aftermath. Students will read documents and literary works that deal with the War as well as view films based on incidents relating to that event. Students will write a variety of short essays on both the historical and artistic reflexations on the War.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 The Latin American Fantastic.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the emergence and development of Latin American "fantastic" literature, one of the most influential literary and philosophical developments of the twentieth century in Latin America. Readings to be announced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 003 Ideologies & Literature of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

By reading political and literary essays, this course will discuss some key moments of Latin America's modern political thought through techniques of literary analysis. We will study some of the twentieth century's most important political speeches in Peru (Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre), Argentina (Juan Domingo Perón), Cuba (Fidel Castro), Chile (Augusto Pinochet), and Venezuela (Rómulo Gallegos) through the notions of epic, drama, comedy, tragedy, and the grotesque.

A course pack will be distributed. There will be oral presentations and three take-home exams. Active participation of students is essential to the development of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 382. Survey of Latin American Literature, II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Focusing on the novel, the short story, poetry, and theater, this course provides a panoramic view of the major movements and literary forms of Latin America from independence to the present.

Readings include:

Chang-Rodríguez, Raquel & Malva Filer. Voces de Hispanoamérica: Antología literaria.
Rulfo, Juan. Pedro Páramo.
Puig, Manuel. El beso de la mujer araña.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish. The central part of the course introduces concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and sounds (phonology). The last third of the course examines subfields of linguistics such as pyscholinguistics (study of language acquisition) and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments, and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 428. Internship in Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and two 300-level SPANISH courses. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows up to 3 credits for internships that involve the extensive use of Spanish, either abroad or within the US. Some of the internships may be offered in established study-abroad programs, others will be offered by companies or non-profit organizations. We highly recommend the non-profit organization, Amigos de las Americas [www.amigoslink.org], a well-established volunteer program that places students in public health projects throughout Latin America.

Our department offers a community service course (Spanish 448), but we do not have the means to organize individual internships, so students will have to take the initiative to locate, arrange, and propose the internships.

Requirements and Procedures: Before the internship, you must arrange the following:

  1. Find a sponsoring faculty member who will advise you, suggest readings, and evaluate the written work that you will submit during and/or after you complete the internship.
  2. Submit a letter from the director or supervisor of the internship program. This letter must:
    1. describe the service work you will perform,
    2. confirm that you will primarily use Spanish in that service work,
    3. specify how many working hours are involved (a minimum of 100 contact hours is required for a three-credit course, or 33 hours per credit if enrolled for less than 3 credits).
  3. Submit a proposal that includes a reading list and written assignments. In the proposal include:
    1. an introductory paragraph that describes the work-site and the services you will perform. Also indicate how the work relates to your academic interests and specialization (majors/minor) and to your future career plans.
    2. a brief list of readings related to your service work-for example, 2-3 books, or 5-10 articles, or an appropriate mix of books and articles. You may choose readings yourself or ask your faculty sponsor for suggestions. We recognize that in an internship, most of your time is taken up by service work, but we require a minimum amount of related readings, as they will help you to reflect critically and thoughtfully on your experiences.
    3. a description of your writing assignments, which may consist either of several short papers or a final project, but must total 10-20 pages. You may write, for example, a narrative summary of your experiences, including critical reflections that also draw from the readings. Or you may write a research paper based on your experiences and the readings.

After completing the internship, you will submit to your faculty sponsor the remaining written assignments along with a second letter from your supervisor in the internship program. This letter should describe the work you performed and reconfirm that it met the requirements of 100 contact hours of primary Spanish usage (or 33 hours per credit).

Enrollment: You may enroll in this course, Spanish 428, either during the term in which you are working as an intern-in which case you would submit the written work at the end of that term; or you may enroll in the term after you return from the internship and submit your work then (which may typically be the case for students who have worked abroad as an intern). In either case, however, you must make arrangements in our department before you begin the internship, by finding a faculty sponsor and submitting a proposal for his/her approval. If you are already abroad when you find an opportunity for an internship, you may through email seek a faculty sponsor and send a proposal to him/her before you begin work. In such a case, first contact professors with whom you have had class. If none is available to serve as a sponsor, contact Amy Roust, our Advising Coordinator [aroust@umich.edu], and she will give you names of faculty to contact. When you are ready to enroll for the credits, your faculty sponsor will notify Sonia Schmerl, our Student Services Representative, and she will send in an override, allowing you to enroll in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Historical Narratives of Latin America

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Latin American "historical novelists" of the second half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century sought to construct their nations by offering models in fiction which are more projective than retrospective, more erotic than data-driven. This course will study the three stages of these "historical narratives" through the "postivist" El Zarco (Mexico, 1888), written by Ignacio Altamirano; the "popular" La sangre y la esperanza (Chile, 1920), by Nicomedes Guzmán; and the "populist" Doña Bárbara (Venezuela, 1929), by Rómulo Gallegos.

Course requirements include oral presentations and three take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 442. Testimonial Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Terror, Memory, and Human Rights.

Instructor(s): Lucia M Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this class is to analyze the historical and political production and use of testimonio literature in Latin America. In the last twenty years testimonio literature has been the topic of heated debate ranging from scholars claiming its importance as a political tool presenting the voice and circumstances of marginalized and oppressed peoples to critics deriding it as lies.

We will explore the forms in which literature is testimonial, as well as the ways testimonial exposure has succeeded in, or failed to, enact political change and social awareness. Some of the many questions to be addressed include: What are the distinctions between testimonial literature and legal testimony? Can testimony be equivalent to truth? What role do memory and political agendas play in the production of testimonial literature? What do we expect from testimonial literature? How did the Rigoberta controversy affect the way other testimonial literature is read? Can fiction be testimonial?

Through journal writing, class presentations, film viewing, and debates, we will be able to arrive at our own conclusions. All classes and most readings will be conducted in Spanish. Students are expected to be active participants in this seminar style class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 458. The Picaresque Novel.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia Santo-Tomas (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 468. Modern Spanish Theater.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Twentieth-century Spanish theater presents us with many literary and social issues that reflect the troublesome history of the country. The plays we will read go from the beginning of the century to the post-Franco period and include authors such as Miguel Mihura, Federico Garcia Lorca, and Antonio Buero Vallejo.

Students are required to participate actively in class discussion and to write a series of papers on the plays we read.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Modernismo.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Modernismo": Literatures & Cultures in Turn of the Century Spanish America

What were the social and cultural conditions of Spanish America's "Modernismo"? And which were the main conceptualizations in Modernista's views of art and politics? As a cultural and literary style original from Spanish America, "Modernismo" has been described by some critics as an "ivory tower" movement . Faced with the challenges between technique, science, and spirituality, Modernismo's political and social commitment was present in their theoretical views of art, religion, and language, but also in allegorical symbols such as the swan, "azul," and the modernist "retablo." In this course we will shed light on the complexities of discourses that shaped Nineteenth century Spanish America to focus on the political, cultural, and controversial nature of languages and cultures in "Modernismo." Through the analysis of the works of figures such as José Martí, Rubén Darío, and Julián del Casal, as well as some women authors such as Ana Roqué and Mercedes Cabello de Carbonera, we will discuss themes such as the relationship between art and technique; women, gender, and the language of poetry; "raros" queerness and writing; and religion and sprituality, among others. Class will be conducted in Spanish. An oral report and a 15 page final paper are required.

Simón Rodríguez, Obras (Selections)
José Martí, Ismaelillo, Crónicas (Selections)
Rubén Darío Azul, Los raros (Selections)
Julián del Casal, Poemas (Selections)
Ana Roqué, Luz y Sombra (Novela)
Mercedes Cabello de Carbonera, Blanca Sol (Novela)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 El sueño y la meditación poética.

Instructor(s): Hugo E Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Qué son los sueños? Qué misterio guardan? Qué revelan sobre nuestro ser, sobre el mundo que habitamos; sobre la vida, la existencia, la realidad, el tiempo, el más allá, la muerte? Estas y similares preguntas se han planteado filósofos, poetas y místicos de todas las épocas y latitudes. En este curso estudiaremos las respuestas que cuatro autores hispánicos del siglo veinte han ofrecido a estas interrogantes de raigambre metafísica: María Zambrano (España), Humberto Díaz Casanueva (Chile), Alejandra Pizarnik (Argentina) y Jaime Sáenz (Bolivia). Apoyándonos en la lectura cuidadosa de los textos seleccionados de estos autures, conversaremos no sólo sobre las cuestiones y los planteamientos que éstos nos ofrecen respecto al valor congnoscitivo de los sueños, sino que también reflexionaremos sobre los puntos de convergencia y divergencia que hay entre el discurso filosófico y el poético.

MATERIALES PARA EL CURSO:
Los sueños y el tiempo de María Zambrano.
Obras completas de Alejandra Pizarnik.
Paquete de fotocopias.

DISTRIBUCIÓN DE LA CALIFICACIÓN DEL CURSO:
Dos exámenes parciales (15 % c/u)...........30%
Dos trabajos escritos (20% c/u)................40%
Participation .......................................25%
Asistencia y puntualidad .........................5%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 What can you make of Julio Cortázar?

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will explore the fiction (and some of the poetry) of the Argentine writer Julio Cortázar (1914-1984). Through slow readings of some of his short fiction, his challenging, experimental novel Rayuela, and a handful of poems, we will study the various contexts out of which this writing emerged, and, still more importantly, explore what, if anything, this writing tells us today. All readings and regular weekly writing in Spanish. Discussion primarily in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Borges.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso se centra en un estudio de los ensayos, narrativas breves, poesía, e invenciones literarias creadas por Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1988). Estudiaremos el uso de citas y personajes históricos apócrifos en sus obras, su fijación por las bibliotecas, los laberintos, los relojes de arena, los espacios y tiempos indefinidos, y los universos por descrubir. Dada la extensa producción de y sobre Borges, este curso explora la consolidación de Borges como un género literario "en sí" durante la primera etapa del escritor. Las lecturas del curso se dedicarán a explorar cómo se consolida "el género Borges" en las siguientes obras del insigne autor argentino: Fervor de Buenos Aires, Luna de enfrente, Cuaderno San Martín, Discusión, Historia universal de la infamia, Historia de la eternidad, Ficciones, Artificios y El Aleph.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level SPANISH literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent Study. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of literary studies as a discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Graduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


Page


This page was created at 3:03 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2002 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.