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Winter Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Core


This page was created at 3:41 PM on Thu, Oct 17, 2002.

Winter Academic Term, 2003 (January 6 - April 25)

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RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 Culture and Politics in Brazil.

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Brazil is known internationally for its rich multi-ethnic cultural production. In this course, we will explore a few of the elements of Brazilian culture that are most evident to outsiders such as samba music, carnival, and the martial arts form, capoeira, as well as the ways these relate to issues such as working class politics, democratization, and family and sexuality. We will take both an academic and a hands-on approach to these issues. Students will analyze scholarly and other writing on the history and social meanings of different forms of cultural production, and attend a performance, film, or a workshop by Brazilian visiting artists. Short written assignments will be completed for each activity. In addition to class activities, each student will choose an element of Brazilian culture to research over the course of the term and will present the results at the end of the term, both in writing and as an individual or group performance or oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 The Nature of the Beast.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Speaking with an admiration akin to awe, Hamlet says, "What a piece of work is a man! How infinite in faculties! In form and moving how express [precise] and admirable! In action how like an angel! In apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world, the paragon of animals!" In Mark Twain's The Mysterious Stranger, however, when someone calls a sadistic act "bestial", Satan points out that only man takes pleasure in cruelty; no animal does. In this term we are going to examine and write about some of the qualities, admirable and frightening, that constitute human nature; our guides will be artists and thinkers who have analyzed and come to conclusions about our natures. Here are some of the topics we will address: "The Value and Limits of Being Reasonable;" "Faith and Atheism;" "Is This an Ordered, Purposeful Universe?"; "The Forces Beneath our Civilized Veneer;" "How Responsible are We?" "What is beyond Conventional Morality?". You will write a variety of papers. Some will analyze the works we have read or seen; some will analyze your own experiences; one will be an exam. The final, long paper will consist of an essay or short story which pursues in depth a facet of our study. The books and films we will read or see will be chosen from the following:

  1. Euthyphro, The Apology, Crito, Plato
  2. Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift
  3. Beyond Good and Evil, Freidrich Nietzsche
  4. Civilization and Its Discontents, Sigmund Freud
  5. The Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
  6. Aunt Dan and Lemon, Wallace Shawn
  7. Mother Night, Kurt Vonnegut
  8. The Seventh Seal, Ingmar Bergman
  9. Notes From Underground, Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003 On Listening to Holocaust Survivors.

Instructor(s): Henry Greenspan (hgreensp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Drawing on the perspectives of history and psychology, this course will explore the experiences of survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. We shall attempt to understand not only some of what survivors endured within the destruction but also in their lives since the Holocaust their lives specifically as survivors.

A special emphasis throughout will be on investigating, and developing, our capacity to listen to survivors. Because survivors use the same words we do, yet have experienced realities totally alien to most of us, we shall continually return to ways we may think we understand survivors yet not actually do so. Aware of these pitfalls, we shall practice understanding better.

The aspects of survivors' experience on which we shall especially focus include: massive psychological trauma; desolation and destruction of identity; the roles of shame, guilt, grief and rage in the aftermath; the need to "bear witness;" the impact of images of survivors in popular culture; the role of Holocaust memorials, museums, and testimony projects; survivors' experiences re-creating family, community, and faith. While the primary emphasis will be on survivors, there will also be classes devoted to perpetrators, bystanders, and resisters during the Holocaust.

Writing assignments for this seminar will include both journal writing and interpretive essays. Theatre and visual art will also play a role. On occasion, we will be joined by survivors and thus have the chance to talk with them directly. There will be a good many evening films as well, so no student should register for this seminar who would not be free to view films on Monday evening between 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.> Reading will include selections from Martin Gilbert, The Holocaust; Elie Wiesel, Night; Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz and The Drowned and the Saved; Charlotte Delbo, None of Us Will Return; Jean Amery, At the Mind's Limits; Isabella Leitner, Fragments of Isabella; Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men; Art Spiegelman, Maus; and a number of excerpts from survivors' audio and video testimony.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 004 Shakespeare (& Other Theater) in Ann Arbor.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to Drama study at the Residential College through the theatre offerings in and around Ann Arbor in Winter Term 2003. The class will study beforehand select plays, attend performances of these plays (on an average of one every two weeks), and through discussion and writing substantially critique the productions seen. Visits from actors, directors, designers, and dramaturges will also be a regular feature of the class. Writing assignments will range from traditional academic background research and criticism of the texts; to interviews with the local threatre artists involved; to report on our own exploratory scenework; to detailed critiques of the productions focusing on the act of interpretation, the complex process of moving a play "from page to stage". Centerpiece of the semester will be the residency of the Royal Shakespeare Company under the sponsorship of the University Musical Society. The RSC will be presenting the tragedy Coriolanus and the comedy Merry Wives of Windsor as well as an original stage adaptation of Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children (this major novel will therefore also be part of the course). Other playgoing will be selected from the offerings of :

  1. the Department of Theatre and Drama and the School of Music's Opera and Musical Theatre programs;
  2. the local Equity house, The Performance Network;
  3. the RC Drama Concentration and various student groups (RC Players, Basement Arts, etc.);
  4. the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre, the Theatre Dept. of Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, etc.

      Through individual playgoing and reporting on these and other theatrical offerings, which will supplement the central, class-wide assignments, it is hoped that we will be able to achieve an overview of the scope and achievements of our local theatre community.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

      Written and Verbal Expression

      Section 005 Comparative Literature, Human Physiology: Literarture and Disease.

      Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The feverish pulse, exotic passion and heightened sensibility, associated with certain infectious diseases, have held a wide-spread fascination for Western literature. In this seminar we will study the contextual role and the cultural effect of diseases like TB, Cholera, Plague, Ebola, AIDS and others. We will read a number of representative works of fiction and drama by Pratolini, Gide, Camus, Dumas, Mann, Epson and supplement our reading with Opera, film and recent documentaries. Participants will be asked to contribute to the breadth and scope of the seminar by preparing one course-related presentation, geared to their own interest or vocational goal. These projects may range from the artistic to the clinical and will be presented in conference style toward the end of the term. Frequent shorter writing assignments on either text related or creative topics will form the basis of class discussions.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 101. Academic Writing.

      Written and Verbal Expression

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: RC First Year Seminar. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (1).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students who have completed the Residential College Freshman Seminar in the Fall term, and are identified as needing further intensive attention to their writing, enroll in this course. Subject matter includes: organization of content, style and substance, and attention to grammar and coherence. Students write and revise three papers, which are ultimately assembled into a representative portfolio. Attendance at all class meetings and conferences is to be considered mandatory in order to receive credit for the class. Class participation includes oral presentation, peer responding to essays, and impromptu in-class writing, Schedules and due dates must be adhered to in order for the requirements to be met.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 191. Intensive German I.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu) , Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/coursedesc.html

      The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 194. Intensive Spanish I.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Olga Maria López-Cotín (olcotin@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The goal of these courses is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 205. Independent Study.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (1-8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

      RCCORE 209. Study Off-Campus.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (Arr).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 290. Intensive French II.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Mireille Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 291. Intensive German II.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick , Karein K Goertz

      Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/coursedesc.html

      Intensive German II covers second-year German in one term. The goals of the course include review and expansion of the grammar and vocabulary presented in Core 191 and further development of student's reading, writing, and speaking skills. As in the other RC German courses, all instruction is conducted in German. Classroom instruction includes discussions, impromptu speaking exercises, performance of skits, numerous writing assignments, and listening and reading exercises. Reading materials include short prose, fairy tales, poetry, and magazine and newspaper articles. A primary objective which RCCORE 291 students strive to meet is "passing proficiency". Achieving this goal gives students a sense of pride and accomplishment. The proficiency exam serves as a qualifying exam for the next required course in the sequence, RCCORE 321 (German Readings).

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

      RCCORE 293 / RUSSIAN 203. Intensive Second Year Russian.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 193 or RUSSIAN 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201 or 202. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/lvl26.html

      See Russian 203.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

      RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Core 294 is a second-year intensive course designed to achieve proficiency in Spanish. The lecture component emphasizes understanding of advanced grammatical structures and syntax, whereas the discussion is devoted to the critical analysis of authentic texts addressing issues relevant to Hispanic experiences in the United States. Through their interaction with the texts and instructors, both in formal and informal contexts, students develop their speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to read journalistic or academic prose with ease as well as write essays of an academic nature with a minimum of English interference.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 295 / LATIN 295. Intensive Latin II.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Gina Marie Soter (soter@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: LATIN 102, 103, or 193/504. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course meets for two hours per day four days per week and covers in one academic term the equivalent of two terms at the level of a non-intensive second-year collegiate course. Through the reading and study of primary texts from Latin authors, students will develop their understanding of grammatical and syntactical structures of Latin, increase their vocabulary, and expand their knowledge of the Roman world. Readings revolve around the intersections of gender politics, insurrection, and rhetoric. In addition, students will work with earlier material remains, such as inscriptions and documentary papyri. The course will conclude with literature from Medieval Latin. Skills will be enhanced through writing, hearing, and speaking the language; content and format alike will encourage students to consider ways in which Latin continues to be very much a part of our world today.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 305. Independent Study.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (1-8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

      RCCORE 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (Independent). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (1-4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is for the student who wishes experience in college teaching. The student-teacher functions as a teaching intern in a course. Regular staff meetings and individual conferences with the person in charge ensures that the intern shares in the overall planning and management of the course. The student may receive credit only once for student-teaching in the same course.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

      RCCORE 309. Study Off-Campus.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (Arr).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 310. Accelerated Review-French.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of Proficiency, as defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College," in the four linguistic skills. Students who take 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course 290 to do so. "Accelerated Review-310" is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students.

      In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style.

      In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Solange Isabel Munoz (solangem@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four semesters of language but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this class is the discussion of primary source materials of literary, cultural and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency in listening and reading comprehension, language structure, and composition.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability


      RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

      Foreign Language

      Section 003.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability


      RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001 The Romantic Experience.

      Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/coursedesc.html

      During this seminar we will ask, how did the German Romantics interpret the human experience? We will seek answers by sampling some of their theoretical writings as well as their artistic expressions in poetry, drama, song cycles, and paintings. At the same time we will reinforce our ability to read, write, and speak German. Students will be asked to create their own "Romantic Journal" in which they will record their responses, essays, notes, commentary, and sketches. The seminar meets three times a week as a group, but students are also expected to regularly work on an individual tutorial basis with the instructor throughout the term.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

      Foreign Language

      Section 002 Play Production Seminar: German Theater.

      Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/coursedesc.html

      In this course, students will read several modern German plays and will become familiar with the 20th century German theater that grew out of the Cabaret tradition. In addition to reading 6-7 plays, students will read several of Brecht's writing about epic theater, do scene work using Brecht's "Lehrstueck" model, and will ultimately participate as technical crew and actors in a multi-media play production of RC "Deutsches Theater" in March/April. In addition to participating in all rehearsals and the final performances, students will be required to give one oral "Referat" on a topic relevant to course readings and to keep a course portfolio containing reflections on readings and scene work, original sketches, and materials collected for possible inclusion in the production. Students may travel at their own expense with the course instructor to Munich over Spring Break to see theater productions and to meet with students and a professor of theater in Munich. RC German readings is a prerequisite for this course, but some students who have not had German Readings may be eligible to participate with permission of the instructor. Students who have participated in RC "Deutsches Theater" in the past are welcome to enroll in the course again.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 001 De la diáspora al desplazamiento: Gitanos, inmigrantes africanos y latinoamericanos en la España contemporánea.

      Instructor(s): Olga Maria Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      El hecho de que los gitanos hayan constituído por largo tiempo la "minoría étnica" en España no ha interferido con la prevalente noción de una identidad española homogénea. Sin embargo, como parte de un fenómeno de inmigración común en toda Europa, España ha experimentado un flujo creciente desde África y Latinoamérica en años recientes que desafía esta noción de homogeneidad cultural y confronta al país con su propia resistencia a la diferencia. Este curso se enfocará en el estudio de las fracturas y transformaciones que estos grupos marginales de antiguo y reciente asentamiento están provocando en la sociedad española contemporánea. El curso abordará la conflictiva historia e identidad cultural de los gitanos en España usándolas como paradigma para entender las manifestaciones actuales de xenofobia hacia los inmigrantes, así como las tensiones y violencia que han emergido. Indagaremos también la paradójica apropiación de sus manifestaciones artísticas tales como el uso de la música y el baile flamencos como iconos de la cultura española al tiempo que persisten políticas legales de segregación espacial y de confinamiento urbanos. Paralelamente, a medida que grupos inmigrantes no-blancos llegan a las fronteras legal o ilegalmente, el conflicto social se formula tanto en leyes de inmigración y medidas políticas concretas como en actitudes colectivas más elusivas y contradictorias. ¿Cuáles son los resultados de esos procesos de inmigración y desplazamiento cultural? ¿Cómo se integran o se segregan legal, cultural y espacialmente? ¿Qué culturas de ghetto se promueven y se subvierten? ¿Son permeables las fronteras? Documentales de RTVE (Radio Televisión Española) sobre inmigración y una serie de films recientes de Documentales y una serie de films recientes de Tony Gatlif, Imanol Uribe e Iciar Bollaín complementarán los materiales de lectura.

      From Diaspora to Displacement: Gypsies, African and Latin American Immigrants in Contemporary Spain

      The fact that gypsies have long constituted the "ethnic minority" in Spain has not interfered with the prevailing notion of a homogeneous Spanish identity. As part of a common trend in Europe, however, Spain has experienced an increasing immigration influx both from Africa and Latin America in recent years that challenges such notion and confronts the country with its own resistance to difference. This course will focus on the study of the history and cultural identity of gypsies within Spanish society in the last century until present day, and will use this as a paradigm to understand current manifestations of xenophobia towards immigrants, as well as the tensions and violence that have emerged. We will also inquire into the paradoxical appropriation of their artistic manifestations such as flamenco music and dance have become icons of Spanish culture while legal policies of spatial segregation and confinement still persist. As new non-white groups reach the border now, we will also analyze how social conflict is being shaped into law as well as into more elusive and contradictory collective attitudes. What are the results of these processes of immigration and cultural displacement? How are they integrated or segregated legally, culturally, spatially? Documentaries produced by RTVE (Radio Televisión Española) on immigration and a series of recent films by Tony Gatlif, Imanol Uribe and Iciar Bollain will complement the readings.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 002 Bilingüismo: Competencia lingüística vs. Cultura lingüística

      Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      El objetivo de esta clase será proporcionar una visión global del bilingüismo, una visión que no se limita al desarrollo de competencia lingüística, sino una perspectiva en la que se presenta el bilingüismo como un medio en la creación de una cultura lingüística. Los temas iniciales explorarán los aspectos lingüísticos del bilingüismo, tal como tipos de hablantes bilingües, patrones de adquisión de una lengua en un contexto bilingüe, rasgos del habla, entre otros. A continuación, se examinará el valor sociocultural asociado con el bilingüismo. ¿Qué relevancia tiene la educación bilingüe en nuestra sociedad? ¿Cuáles son los mitos y creencias asociados con la educación bilingüe? ¿Cómo afectanestas creencias la relación entre lengua mayoritaria e identidad nacional? ¿Cómo afectan las políticas lingüísticas? ¿Cómo afectan la educación de los estudiantes de minorías lingüísticas? ¿Cómo afectan el desarrollo de una identidad cultural lingüística? Leeremos artículos sobre la lingüística y cuentos de personas bilingües hablando de sus experiencias.

      Bilingualism: Linguistic competence vs. Linguistic Culture

      The aim of this course is to provide a global understanding of bilingualism, one that is not limited to the acquisition of linguistic competence, but rather a view that recognizes bilingualism as a means for the development of linguistic culture. Initial exploration into the topic will focus on linguistic aspects of bilingualism, such as bilingual types, patterns of language acquisition, features of bilingual speech, among others. Afterwards, we will examine the sociocultural value associated to bilingualism. What is the relevance of bilingual education in our society? What myths and beliefs are associated with bilingual education? How do these beliefs reflect the relationship between the majority language and national identity? How do they affect language policy? How do they affect the education of linguistic-minority students? How do they affect the development of a linguistic cultural identity? We will be reading articles from linguistics as well as short stories and poems by bilingual speakers reflecting on their personal experiences.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 003 Ciudades latinoamericanas.

      Instructor(s): Moira Liliana Zellner (mzellner@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Las ciudades son manifestaciones físicas de procesos sociales, económicos y políticos, delimitados en un tiempo y un espacio que comparten con los procesos biológicos del ambiente. Esta compleja interacción se traduce en mecanismos de adaptación mutua y permanente. Las ciudades no son estáticas, sino dinámicas y están continuamente sufriendo cambios. Reconocer este aspecto vivo de las ciudades permite situarlas en contexto, e identificar más claramente los factores que son importantes en su forma, función, e identidad, y cómo afectan la calidad de vida de sus habitantes.

      En este marco, exploraremos algunos de los aspectos importantes en la formación de ciudades latinoamericanas, por ejemplo, los procesos históricos y culturales, la política y el poder, las políticas urbanas y de desarrollo económico y social, y el rol de los espacios y recursos públicos. Se hará énfasis en la interacción de estos factores y en su impacto sobre la forma urbana, la integración social y económica, y la calidad ambiental. Las discusiones se centrarán en la comparación con ciudades norteamericanas.

      Latin-American Cities

      Cities are physical manifestations of social, economic, and political processes, set in specific temporal and spatial frameworks that are shared with the biological processes of the environment. This complex interaction translates into mutual and permanent mechanisms of adaptation. Cities are not static, but dynamic, and are continuously going through change. To recognize this living aspect of cities allows to set them in context, and more clearly identify the important factors that shape their form, function and identity, and how these in turn affect the quality of life of their inhabitants.

      Within this framework, we will explore some of the important aspects in the formation of Latin-American cities, e.g. historical and cultural processes, politics and power, urban policies and economic and social development policies, the role of public spaces and resources. The interaction of these factors will be emphasized, and the impact on urban form, social and economic integration, and environmental quality. Discussions will focus on comparisons with North American cities.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 004 América Latina: periodismo, libertad de prensa y su percepción en la prensa norteamericana.

      Instructor(s): Maria Elena Gil

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Este curso pretende proveer a los estudiantes con un mejor entendimiento del concepto de democracia y su influencia en la práctica del periodismo en América Latina. Se analizarán en clases las definiciones de libertad de prensa y sus diferentes interpretaciones en varios países. Algunas clases se enfocarean en cómo la prensa norteamericana configura las percepciones de la audiencia en Estados Unidos sobre los sucesos, ya sean históricos o actuales, en América Latina. La influencia de la oleada democrática en el continente durante la última parte del Siglo XX, las relaciones entre la prensa y los gobiernos que no aceptan el papel del periodismo independiente, la concentración de la propiedad sobre los medios, y las cuotas de publicidad como un medio de influir en la prensa serán otros temas de debate durante el curso. Durante el curso, los alumnos tendrán la oportunidad de examinar dos casos: México y Cuba. En el caso de México, estudiarán el Grupo Reforma como un ejemplo de evolución de una prensa controlada políticamente hacia una prensa libre. En el caso de Cuba, analizarán los medios de prensa controlados por el Estado en el único país socialista del continente. Se recomendarán textos adicionales en dependencia de los casos de estudio seleccionados. Durante el curso se realizarán búsquedas en Internet de medios de prensa electrónicos de América Latina. Los periódicos y revistas que se analizarán durante el curso estarán disponibles en la Graduate Library. Un paquete de materiales impresos seleccionados para este curso estará disponible para los alumnos al comenzar las clases.

      Latin America: journalism, freedom of the press and their perception in the American media.

      This course intends to provide students with an understanding of the concept of democracy and its influence in the practice of journalism in Latin America. Definitions of freedom of the press, and its different interpretations in several countries will be analyzed in class. Some classes will focus in how American media shapes U.S. audience perceptions about either historical or current events in Latin America. The influence of the wave of democracy around the continent in the last part of the XX century, the relations between the press and governments which don't accept the role of independent journalism, the concentration of media ownership, and the advertising as a way of influence the media will be other subjects of debate during this course. During the course, the students will have the opportunity to examine two cases: Mexico and Cuba. In the Mexico case they will study the Reforma Group as an example of evolution from a controlled to a free press. In the Cuba case, they will analyze the state-controlled media in the only Socialist country in the continent. All along the course, students will be encouraged to confront and compare the coverage of current events by American media and by the local media in any Latin American country, based on Internet search.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

      Foreign Language

      Section 005 El mundo inventado: Exploración de la literatura, la pintura y otras turas.

      Instructor(s): Monica Celeste Llado-Ortega

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      "Nuestra verdad posible tiene que ser la invención, es decir escritura, literatura, pintura, escultura, agricultura, piscicultura, todas las turas de este mundo." Julio Cortázar

      En este curso exploraremos la literatura hispana y otras turas que surgen y brotan de esa literatura. Es decir que estudiaremos las conexiones y traducciones que se dan entre diversos medios artísticos como la pintura, la escritura, el cine y la música hispana. Nos enfocaremos en 3 temas que guiarán nuestra exploración de turas; lo mágico y su relación con lo cotidiano, los sentidos y sus poderes creativos, y el margen como lugar de revelación e invención de turas. Entre las preguntas que exploraremos juntos estarán; ¿Qué es la invención y qué funciones tiene en nuestras vidas?, ¿De qué maneras son las turas un reflejo del mundo en que vivimos?, ¿Cómo nos sirven las turas para inventarnos a nosotros mismos?, ¿Qué conexiones existen entre el mundo inventado de las turas y el mundo "real," son acaso el mismo mundo? En nuestra navegación entre la palabra, la imagen y otras turas intentaremos diversos métodos de traducción y conexión entre los múltiples medios artísticos que exploraremos. En la clase estimularemos nuestra creatividad a través de diferentes actividades artísticas en las cuales inventaremos nuestras propias interpretaciones y propuestas, sean escritas, pintadas, o interpretadas, de los temas que exploraremos. A través de estas actividades de múltiples formas de invención y creatividad, también veremos la diversidad de turas en el mundo hispano y su relación con nuestras propias vidas. De esta manera pondremos a prueba la idea de la invención, la tura, como "nuestra verdad posible."

      The Invented World : Explorations of Literature, Painting and other Inventions

      "Our possible truth must be invention, that is to say writing, literature, painting, sculpture, agriculture, pisciculture, all the 'tures' of this world." Julio Cortázar

      In this course we will explore the literature of the Spanish speaking world as well as the other tures that arise and sprout out of this literature. That is to say, we will study the connections and translations that occur among different artistic media such as painting, writing, film and music. We will focus our exploration of inventions or tures on three main themes that will guide us; Magic and its relation to the quotidian, the senses and their creative powers, and the margin as a space of revelation and invention of tures. Among the questions we will explore are; What is invention and what functions does it have in our lives?, In what ways are tures a reflection of the world we live in?, How do tures help us invent ourselves?, What connections exist between the invented world of tures and the "real" world, are they in fact the same world? In our navigation between words, images and other tures we will try diverse methods of translation and connection of the multiple artistic media that we will explore. In this class we will stimulate our own creativity through different activities (writing, painting, performance, etc.) through which we will invent our own interpretations and proposals of the themes being explored. Through these creative and inventive activities we will also encounter the multiple and diverse tures of the Spanish speaking world and their relation to our own lives. In this way we will put to test the idea of invention, or ture, as our "possible truth."

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

      Written and Verbal Expression

      Section 002 Berlin: Reco(r)ding the City.

      Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/

      As incubators for new ideas and sites of dynamic contradiction, cities have long inspired novelists, filmmakers and artists. In this seminar, Berlin will serve as the case study to examine the relationship between cities as physical places and as imagined, discursive spaces. Berlin provides an historically and culturally rich object of study; over the course of one century, it was the capital of the German empire, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the GDR and now reunited Germany. In novels, paintings and films, Berlin has been depicted in metaphoric terms: as symphony, machine, seductress, maze, moral parable, haunted city, etc. By studying the city in its various guises, we recognize a variant of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle: that when we observe and represent the city, we do not see the city itself, but rather, the city exposed to our particular method of questioning. These questions are determined by the observer's historical and subjective position and by the particular parameters of genre and medium.

      The goal of the class is for students to generate their own spatio-narrative video mappings of the city that incorporate secondary readings and first-hand experiences. Through in-class workshops organized in conjunction with the Media Union, students will be trained in video production and editing. Over the Spring Break, students have the option of traveling to Berlin as a group to record their engagement with the city. Integrating original video and audio footage and text, as well as excerpts from prior readings, they will use digital video to document the relationship between the city as abstraction, preconceived image and acquired knowledge and the city as actual, physical place. For those unable to travel overseas, Ann Arbor, Detroit or Chicago can serve as sites for video production and comparative analysis.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Restricted to Residential College students

      RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

      Written and Verbal Expression

      Section 003 English Grammar and Writing.

      Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability


      RCCORE 405. Independent Study.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (1-8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

      RCCORE 409. Study Off-Campus.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (Arr).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      RCCORE 410. Senior Project.

      Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

      Credits: (1-8).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      An individual project in the field of concentration.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

      Graduate Course Listings for RCCORE.


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