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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in CAAS


This page was created at 7:01 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



CAAS 104. First Year Humanities Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 — Narratives of Liberation. Meets with ENGLISH 140.001.

Instructor(s): Keizer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 140.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 104. First Year Humanities Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 — The Culture of Jazz. Meets with AMCULT 103.003.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is jazz? It's music, but it's also more than that. And though jazz recordings now account for no more than 3% of music sales in the U.S.A., the influence of jazz upon American music, literature, ideas, images, and style has been and continues to be immense. Why is that? This course will explore this paradox by introducing students to the history of jazz music (esp. the 1920-1970 period) in the contexts of its special place in African American cultural and literary history as well as in the American cultural imagination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 104. First Year Humanities Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 — Late 19th-Century African American Fiction. Meets with ENGLISH 140.003.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 140.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

CAAS 200. Introduction to African Studies.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give students an overview of the historical, political, and economic developments in sub-Saharan Africa. This course does not seek to be comprehensive, for the focus of the overview will be on significant themes and on the myriad forces that will help us understand how Africa came to acquire its present characteristics. The course will begin with an examination of internal and external developments that culminated in the rise of centralized states. The complex interplay between these two sets of forces and its implications for the rise and evolution of contemporary Africa will be addressed. That will be followed by an exploration of vital issues, concerns, and problems facing Africa now and in the foreseeable future. Central among these are: the rise of new social classes and the struggle for power in the colonial and post-colonial periods; centralization of power and the struggle for more democratic systems of rule; shifts in strategies of development, population growth, and the roles of women and development. The aim in presenting a historical background at the outset is to sketch a context for exploring the nature of these problems and issues

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 201. Introduction to Afro-American Studies.

African-American Studies

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kevin K Gaines (gaineskk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to help students sort through social and theoretical questions concerning Black Diasporan identities by foregrounding the influential notion of Africa as a mythic geographic site, the significance of Black as a label of social identification, and the varied approaches to self-definition taken by African-American and Caribbean peoples in disparate national contexts. Because the multicultural history and present of Black Diasporan culture and identity are so historically exposed as obviously possessing multiple African, European, and Native American influences, Black Diasporan identity is also conspicuously intermixed. Whether it is a matter of language, religion, food, or music, the "mixed" nature of the identity cannot be avoided. At the same time, particular Black Diasporan identities have become encrusted with national, racial, linguistic, and other cultural stereotypes continually re-formed in mass culture. Notions of the Jamaican, the Cuban, the African-American, for instance, show up in a variety of contemporary contexts, sometimes spread by African-American or Caribbean peoples intentionally and/or unintentionally but most frequently shaped by mass media apparatus not fully in the control of these African-descended people. Historical debates over national interests versus global identification among the African-American and Caribbean peoples have continued to reverberate in the ways that these African descended people are sometimes clumped together as a single group despite their obvious differences in language, tradition, politics, and culture, and yet at other times their differences are showcased such that Afro-Cubans as categorized as Hispanics or Latinos but African-Americans as Blacks in U.S. culture, for instance. Because emigration, immigration, and remigration have played such a vital role in the formation and deformation of Black Diasporan identities, this course will pay particular attention to the questions of how such resettlements help to rigidify and disturb settled notions of what constitutes Black Diasporan identity in general, and African-American and Caribbean identity in particular. How do we gauge the identity-location of someone like Sidney Poitier or Colin Powell, whose influences on U.S. and global cultures have been so prominent. Is Poitier, for instance, Bahamian, Caribbean, Bahamian American, African American? At one point does an identity slip from being identified with a particular nation to being identified with the final country of settlement to being identified with a global Black culture? How does one locate the African versus the British versus the American versus the Native American influence on and impact of "Poitier" as a mass cultural phenomenon? Moving beyond individual subjects to collective ones, we'll ask similar questions about such cultural expressions as Reggae, Calypso, Dancehall, Ska, and Hip Hop. While the course focuses on the intermixed multicultural manifestations in films, music, fiction, and other cultural forms, it also requires students to study some key theoretical reflections on the problem of Black Diasporan identity formation in the contemporary diaspora. Readings from Michael Omi and Howard Winant's "Racial Formation," Edwidge Danticat's Farming of Bones, Thomas Hylland Erikson's "Ethnicity, Race and Nation: What is Ethnicity," Antonio Benitez-Rojo's The Repeating Island: The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective, Angelyn Mitchell's Within the Circle, Present. Kamau Brathwaite's Contradictory Omens: Cultural Diversity and Integration in the Caribbean, Carole Boyce Davies' Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject, and Hilary Beckles and Verene Shepherd's Caribbean Freedom: Economy and Society from Emancipation to the Intended Audience

This course is aimed at a broad undergraduate audience. It is intended also as an introductory level course for CAAS concentrators and minors who have or are completing CAAS 111, "Intro to Africa & Its Diaspora," to satisfy the requirement for a cross-area course (one focusing on issues across Caribbean and African American Studies) at the 200 level. Because this is a discussion-intensive course, students will be required to participate in class discussion individually and through small-group activities, as well as to do individual and group presentations. Several short essays (1 to 3 pages), two longer essays (5 to 6 pages), and a final paper (12 to 15 pages) are included in the written assignments. There will be a final exam, and perhaps a midterm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 214 / HISTART 214. Introduction to African-American Art.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 214.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 230 / HISTORY 274. Survey of Afro-American History I.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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CAAS 247(448) / HISTORY 247. Modern Africa.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jean-Herve Gilbert Jezequel

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/247/001.nsf

See HISTORY 247.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 303 / SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm (gpmason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Theme Semester R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/303/001.nsf

See SOC 303.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

CAAS 336 / HISTORY 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in America.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As an exploration of African-American women during the twentieth century, this course seeks to explore varieties of experience — class, ethnicity, sexuality, and region — as it provides an historical framework for analyzing overarching issues facing contemporary Black women in the United States. We are going to discuss Black women's relationships to both intraracial and broader communities; we shall consider how the nexus of race, gender, and class has influenced Black women's work, activism, political involvement, and creative output. And, given the thrust of much historical and contemporary discourse, we will examine what has been commonly referred to the "crisis in African-American gender relations."

Whereas this course is structured as a history course, it takes an interdisciplinary approach to Black women's lives: readings will draw from memoir, sociology, women's studies, film studies, and legal theory. Throughout the academic term, we shall discuss Black feminism as well: not only does Black feminist theory contain salient observations on the interplay between race, gender, class, and sexuality in the United States, the very issue of feminism has been an critical — and often divisive — issue for any number of African-American social movements.

Course Requirements: Successful completion of the course is contingent upon appropriate preparation for each class meeting. And, since each session builds upon previous meetings, regular attendance is absolutely critical. Similarly, careful reading of assignments is both expected and required given that informed discussion is a vital part of this course. Written requirements include completion of two reading comments (2-3 pages), one five page essay, a midterm examination, and a final examination.

Course texts include the following:

  • Deborah Gray White, Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894-1994 (Norton, 1999);
  • Gerda Lerner, ed., Black Women in White America: A Documentary History (Vintage, 1992);
  • Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Words of Fire: An Anthology of African-American Feminist Thought (New Press, 1995).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 342 / THTREMUS 233. Acting and the Black Experience.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Glenda Dickerson (glendad@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (brief interview). CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See THTREMUS 233.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CAAS 348 / DANCE 358. Dance in Culture: Origins of Jazz Dance.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 001 — Asians and Blacks in Detroit. Meets with AMCULT 305.001 and HISTORY 468.001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/305/001.nsf

See HISTORY 468.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 002 — Conflict and Violence in Africa. Meets with CAAS 595.001 and History 357.001.

Instructor(s): Jean-Herve Gilbert Jezequel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 357.001.

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CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 004 — Re-membering Landscapes: The Territory of Caribbean Identity. Meets with COMPLIT 350.001.

Instructor(s): Seanna S Oakley (ssoakley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See COMPLIT 350.001.

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CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 005 — Urban and Community Studies II. Meets with RCSSCI 360.005.

Instructor(s): Derrick I M Gilbert (derrickg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCSSCI 360.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 006 — Mapping PARIS Through America and Africa. Meets with FRENCH 331.002.

Instructor(s): Alain Michel Mabanckou (ambanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Paris as the metropole has always fascinated everybody because so many of us are postcolonial subjects. Through their gaze and understanding of this city as the center, African and American writers have in their different ways critiqued the centralization of the French culture which excludes them culturally and literally. We will explore in this course the extent to which approaching this exclusion has actually been mediated through artistic creation.

Thus, in this course we will study works by African (such as Bernard Dadié) and American artists (such as James Baldwin ) which discuss Paris as the site of hegemonic discourse. The goal is mapping the silenced relationship between Paris, Africa, and America. We will also analyze the way in which African, American, and French cultures are actually in opposition with each other while simultaneously being complementary.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  1. An African in Paris, (Novel) by Bernard Dadié
  2. Giovanni's Room, (Novel) by James Baldwin
  3. Ambiguous Adventure (Novel) by Cheikh Kane
  4. All that Blue (Novel) by Gaston-Paul Effa

FILMS:

  1. The price of the ticket
  2. La Noire de…
  3. Aimé Césaire

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 361. Comparative Black Art.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Lockard (jmlockaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 360. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A continuation of CAAS 360, this accelerated course provides an interdisciplinary overview of Afro-American culture and art. CAAS 361 develops further information and dialogue for a closer examination of the interrelationship of the arts, and of how they influence and are influenced by society. The approach continues to be interdisciplinary, and Afrocentric. The Afro-American cultural experience and its various forms of existence and encounters are brought under close scrutiny in a variety of contexts: these will range from the historical and political to the philosophical, the religious, and the aesthetic. In the process, this course also examines the relationship of West African cultures to both South and North American insistencies. The course also recognizes and will examine the controversies surrounding the impact of the Afrocentric aesthetic on Western culture and lifestyles. Slides, films, and guest appearances will supplement lectures. But this course also is designed to be interactive and communal and to create opportunities for students to strengthen their skills and establish a clearer, more substantial concept of identity, focus, and direction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 394. Junior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 — Social and Political Changes in African Literature.

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a general introduction to the social and political transformation that occurred in Africa since the early years of the twentieth century. The transformation has been profound, and African writers have not escaped its impulse, and have sought to give expression to it in their writings. We will seek to understand aspects of the social changes through the eyes and words of African novelists who live and write in Africa. We will focus on: significant cultural changes resulting from the contact between African peoples and Europeans; the popular struggle to make sense of the European presence, the social inequalities and the conflicts they generate in the post-colonial period. African writers have shed a great deal of light on these issues, and their writings thus provide us with a rare opportunity to think critically about the constantly changing historical circumstances of African politics and social structure. We will discuss one novel a week, and every student will be responsible for leading the discussion for one class period. Active class participation will be encouraged. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 394. Junior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 — White Priviledge.

Instructor(s): Gilbert

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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CAAS 405 / ANTHRARC 400. Field Studies.

Ngayene Field Station. Meets January 5-March 10 in West Africa.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (8). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRARC 400.

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CAAS 406 / ANTHRARC 401. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in CAAS 405. (6). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRARC 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 408. African Economies: Social and Political Settings.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Howard Stein (howstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to African economic development. The focus of the course is to understand the origin and nature of the economic crisis in Africa along with the options available for reversing the continent's economic malaise. The first part of the course will present a history of African economic development with an emphasis on understanding the economic legacy of the pre-colonial and colonial period. The second part of the course will aim at identifying the evolution of the economic crisis during the first two decades of independence. The final section offers a critical examination of the nature and impact of the World Bank/IMF-sponsored adjustment policies with a discussion of possible alternatives to adjustment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. (Cross-Area Courses). Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (CAAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

CAAS 418 / POLSCI 324. Black Americans and the Political System.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See POLSCI 324.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 420 / ANTHRCUL 347. Race and Ethnicity.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 347.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 422 / ANTHRCUL 411. African Culture.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 and 450 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/caas/451/001.nsf

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 001 — Space, Archeology & Afro-American Identity. Meets with AMCULT 498.001 & ARCH 409.053.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu), Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/498/001.nsf

See AMCULT 498.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 002 — Comparing Black Drama: August Wilson, Derek Walcott and Wole Soyinka. Meets with THTREMUS 440.001.

Instructor(s): Mbala D Nkanga

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be devoted in exploring the major developments in the aesthetic experience of Black Drama and Theatre in the U.S., the West Indies, and Africa. Through the reading of plays (some in class) and critical materials, viewing videos and films, students will consider, question, and compare the experience of domination, colonialism, post-colonialism, and emancipation of the Black people in this geographical space as expressed by various playwrights and artists of African descent over the last fifty years. The playwrights in consideration for this course are: Ama Ata Aidoo, Amiri Baraka, Aimé Césaire, Sony Labou Tansi, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, and August Wilson.

In addition to these playwrights, students will question essays and other critical and historical materials by writers such as DuBois, Asante, Appiah, Gates, Soyinka, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, and Jeyifo, as they pertain to Blackness and its expression. The course will combine historical perspectives and theatre and performance criticism approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 003 — Black Women of the U.S. Caribbean, and Latin America: Life, Literature and Music. Meets with ENGLISH 417.004.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/417/004.nsf

See ENGLISH 417.004.

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CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 004 — Race and Displacement. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.006.

Instructor(s): Partridge

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 458.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 005 — Higher Ed & African-American Social Development.

Instructor(s): Larry Rowley (llrowley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a conceptually and empirically informed discussion of various factors related to the role played by higher education in the social development of the African-American population in the United States. Historically, access to higher education has had an important impact on the overall life chances of African Americans within the American social structure. Higher education attainment has also proven to be an important vehicle for African Americans to achieve social and economic well-being. However, there is often not a clear understanding of the social, economic, and political mechanisms by which higher education has enhanced or impeded African-American social development in the larger historical and contemporary struggle for racial equality and democracy in American society. This course examines those mechanisms as well as many of the social and economic benefits associated with advanced education including higher incomes and wealth, upward social mobility, career and social opportunities, and access to the knowledge and social or political resources needed to acquire a high standard of living. African-American higher education issues from the early twentieth century to the present are discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 006 — Culture, Racism, and Human Nature. Meets with ANTHRCUL 447.001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 447.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 007 — Religions of the African Diaspora. Meets with LACS 455.001 and PORTUG 474.003.

Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 455.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 008 — Literature and Social History (Brazil). Meets with LACS 455.002 and HISTORY 478.002 and PORTUG 474.004.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 009 — Culture, Poverty, and Medicine. Meets with WOMENSTD 483.001.

Instructor(s): Amal Hassan Fadlalla

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Section 010 — Black Atlantic Visual Cultures: Time & Vision. Meets with HISTART 489.002

Instructor(s): David T Doris (dtdoris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 489.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 476 / ENGLISH 478. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

African-American Studies

Section 001 — The African American Novel. Satisfies both the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CAAS 478 / LACS 400 / HISTORY 578. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Afro-Caribbean Studies

Section 001 — Race and Popular Culture in 20th-Century Brazil. Taught in Portuguese. Meets with PORTUG 474.001.

Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. (Afro-Caribbean Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 400.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 478 / LACS 400 / HISTORY 578. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Afro-Caribbean Studies

Section 002 — Slavery, Disease and Race: A View from Brazil. Meets with PORTUG 474.002.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. (Afro-Caribbean Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See LACS 400.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 487. Communication Media in the Black World: Electronic Media.

African-American Studies

Section 001 — Broadcasting, African Americans, and Civil Rights. Meets with COMM 458.003.

Instructor(s): Catherine R Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will introduce students to theories of the public sphere, audiences, and mass media with a focus on African Americans' experiences with media and public spheres. Through readings, discussions, and writings, students will confront questions such as: In what ways do African American experiences challenge traditional conceptions of the public sphere and the mass media audience? How do we conceptualize African American audiences and other racialized audiences? What are the intersections between mass media audiences and public spheres? What are the relationships between audiences, publics, and social movements? Are audiences always-already publics? What are the implications of different methodological approaches to studying the interplay between media, audiences and/or publics? At the end of the course, students will submit a 15-20 page paper on a topic of their choice. Students who are currently engaged in or are planning to engage in studies of Black audiences and/or publics are encouraged to use the paper as an opportunity to merge their research with ideas learned in the course. Students who are researching other ethnic/social audience groups are also welcome to enroll and focus their final paper on other groups, as long as theories learned in class are incorporated in some way. Preliminary List of Readings: The Black Public Sphere, Habermas and the Public Sphere, The Phantom Public Sphere, The Mass Audience: Rediscovering the Dominant Model, The Audience Studies Reader, Media Use as Social Action: European Approach to Audience Studies Say It Loud! Black Audiences, Media & Identity Media, Culture & the Modern African American Freedom Struggle, Frontiers in Social Movement Theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Section 001 — The Politics of Class in the African American Community. Meets March 2-23. [2 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=March 8).

Instructor(s): Alvin Tillery (atillery@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the politics of class in the African American community in both historical and modern contexts through the following questions. How significant are social, political and cultural cleavages between lower, middle, and upper income persons for understanding politics within the African American community? Does understanding the nature of these cleavages help us come to grips with the rise and decline of African American social movements in the 19th and 20th centuries? How do these cleavages play themselves out in debates over representation and public policy questions? Is there an authentic African American leadership style derived from a class identity? If so, from which income group is this leadership style derived? Will class cleavages be more or less important in African American community of the future?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 495. Senior Seminar.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 — 20th-Century Black Atlantic Intellectuals.

Instructor(s): Lori Brooks (llbrooks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. (Cross-Area Courses). (Capstone Course).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/caas/495/001.nsf

This course emphasizes the circulation of ideas among persons of African descent in the 20th-century "Black Atlantic." The term "Black Atlantic" treats the region between the United States, West Africa, Great Britain, and the Caribbean as one unit, emphasizing the movement of Black bodies and racial theories across the Atlantic Ocean and national borders. The reading assignments are chosen to highlight these patterns of Black migration and the creation of Black intellectual communities in various parts of the Black Atlantic. In addition to tracing the intellectual history of Pan-Africanism, anticolonial thought and action, intellectual decolonization, and theories of racial solidarity, we will be investigating such concepts as national citizenship, "the African diaspora", and "multiculturalism" as they have been used and transformed by these thinkers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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