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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 7:15 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 — Medicine, Health, and the Body in America (20th Century).

Instructor(s): Alexandra Minna Stern (amstern@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/102/001.nsf

In this course, we will explore health, healing, and the body in the United States in the 20th century. We will pay particular attention to issues of race and racism, gender and sexuality, immigration, cultural translation, and power. We will entertain some of the following questions:

  • How are diseases "discovered," labeled, and eventually treated?
  • What does "race" have to do with medicine and science?
  • What is the history of informed consent and why is it important? How are normality and abnornality medically defined and why does it matter?
  • What does it mean to be a medical patient or practitioner?
  • What are the limits to transforming the body through technology?
  • Can seemingly incommensurable medical systems and vocabularies speak to one another?

We will explore these issues thematically and in terms of change across time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 — Asian American Women's Fiction.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of Asian American women's recent literary and cultural production. Topics we may explore include the following: stereotypes and Orientalism; the relation between memory, story, and history; the uses of autobiography; women of color literature and theory; femininity, culture, and the family; sex and desire; violence within and without the home; mixed heritage; homophobia; and immigrant experience(s). Generally, the course will help students improve their literary analytical skills and expository writing, while introducing them to the complexity and breadth of Asian American women's literary experimentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 002 — Immigration In Film.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Immigration is a basic, vital factor in contemporary America and in our history. America is not alone in this. Immigration is pervasive globally.

In this course, we will study the representation of immigrant life in films, both fictional and documentary. We will also read about immigration. Our goal is to understand the immigrant experience on as many levels as possible — personal, social, economic, political.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 003 — The Culture of Jazz. Meets with CAAS 104.003.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is jazz? It's music, but it's also more than that. And though jazz recordings now account for no more than 3% of music sales in the U.S.A., the influence of jazz upon American music, literature, ideas, images, and style has been and continues to be immense. Why is that? This course will explore this paradox by introducing students to the history of jazz music (esp. the 1920-1970 period) in the contexts of its special place in African American cultural and literary history as well as in the American cultural imagination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 201. American Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristin Ann Hass (kah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the riot of ideas, conflicts, and material realities that have defined and shaped culture in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present. Focusing on the relationship between ideology, culture, and power in U.S. history, the course will draw on a range of methods and sources — including fiction, music, movies, architecture, historical research, and images in art — to reconstruct a history of ways in which Americans have imagined their nation and the ways in which this "imagined community" has been continually transformed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 — Sports in American Culture.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 205. American Cultures.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/205/001.nsf

This lecture-and-discussion course focuses on the historic and cultural contexts of "what is an American" by bringing together narrative texts and architectural spaces that represent, interrogate, and complicate the concepts of national identity. We will pay close attention to the ways in which texts and architectural forms — books and buildings — recorded and interpreted various stages in the formation of Americanness. While telescoping onto the historic and literary moments in which the notions of race, gender, class, and ethnicity determined who did or did not belong in the idealized American social space, we will trace a fascinating dialogue between the making of this culture through stories, novels, and actual and imagined places, forms, and structures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 — American Subcultural Movements — Beatniks, Hippies and Punks.

Instructor(s): Bruce M Conforth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 211. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 — Jewish-American Identities, American Cultures.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll look at the Jewish-American experience from roughly 1880 to the present day from a comparative perspective: that is, in terms of the ways in which that experience looks when placed in relation to that of African-Americans (and the fraught idiom of race), Asian-Americans (and the "model minority" myths applied to both groups) and other Euro-Americans. Our readings will be drawn from history (e.g., Matthew Frye Jacobsen's Whiteness of a Different Color), from anthropology (Sherry Ortner's New Jersey Dreaming: Capital, Culture, and the Class of '58) musicology (Jeffrey Melnick's The Right to Sing the Blues), and film criticism (Michael Rogin's Black Face, White Noise); but we'll spend most of our time reading novels, poems, and plays, and watching films that speak to the complexities both of the Jewish-American experience and of its place in the ethnoracial hurly-burly of twentieth-century America. Two short papers; One long one; quizzes every now and then to keep you on your toes!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 213. Introduction to Latino Studies — Humanities.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alvarez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 217. Introduction to Native American Studies — Humanities.

Native American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an introduction to the historical and literary cultures of Native America. We will

  • trace the evolution of the indigenous cultures of the United States through pre-contact oral literature, tribal colonization, and removal to the reservation, the creation of the Native American as American citizen, and

  • explore native identity — as conceived by native writers and American popular culture — at the end of the 20th century.

We will rely, when possible, on the words of Native Americans to discuss "contact" between tribal peoples and EuroAmericans and the resulting "adaptations" in tribal culture and identity. In addition to literature, we will rely on film, documentary and popular, for the representation of native experience and to chart images of the American Indian. Students are not expected to have knowledge of native history or literature; the course is designed to provide an introduction to both. An advanced course, ENGLISH 382, will be taught in Winter Term. There will be two lecture sessions and one discussion section per week. Students will be required to keep a journal of their readings, to participate in discussion groups, and take a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an academic minor in Native American Studies.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, introductions, table talk, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an academic minor in Native American Studies.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melanie Anne Boyd (maboyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/womenstd/240/001.nsf

See WOMENSTD 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 243 / WOMENSTD 243. Introduction to Study of Latinas in the U.S.

Latino/a Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rosario Carrillo (rcarrill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rcarrill/ContentsAC243.html

For over a century Latinas have been writing themselves into U.S. history, continuously redefining their political, cultural, and social locations within the discourses of American identity. Their refusal to remain silent observers of "history" has resulted in a body of work — poems, essays, novels, and short stories — that reveals the ways in which ethnic, racial, class, gender, and sexual differences shape our conceptions of American identity. In this course, we will explore the narrative practices of Latinas, paying special attention to the ways in which their poems, short stories, novels, and theoretical essays have given voice to their differential locations within the discourses of American identity and culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 260 / HISTORY 260. Religion in America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 160 and 161 are recommended but not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 260.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 — Feminist Practice of Oral History. [3 Credits]. Meets with WOMENSTD 345.002 and WOMENSTD 698.008.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. Offered in conjunction with the United States Site of the Global Feminisms Project, we will examine methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We will explore issues to consider, such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator", legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories. Students will learn different strategies of how to prepare for, conduct, and process an oral history interview; how to develop an interview question guide, how to do background research, how to phrase questions to get the most out of an interview, and what type of equipment choices one has. Toward the latter half of the course, we will cover post-interview processing, including: transcribing, editing, indexing, and presenting the interview.

For the term project, students will have the opportunity to uncover "new" historical findings, by interviewing one woman you know. If you don't have someone already in mind, you can choose from one of five scholar/activists from the Global Feminisms Project's U.S. Site. If you interview an activist from the GF Project, the U.S. Site Project will provide funding for the interviewee's travel expenses to Ann Arbor and assistance with filming the interview at the UM TV studio. For the term project, students can shape their oral history interviews into a research paper or a creative project or performance. Class sessions will allow you to learn techniques and share your experiences as you plan and carry out your interview. There may be some class sessions where we will not meet, in order to give you release time to conduct your research.

This course is open to a limited number of undergraduate and graduate students. Suggested prerequisite: successful completion of WOMENSTD 240.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 — Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. MINI COURSE MEETS FEB 10-MAR 16. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=February 17).

Instructor(s): Roland Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee required.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 — Anarchy in the U.S.A.: Exploring Radical Art. [3 Credits]. Meets with ENGLISH 317.003.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 317.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 304 / SOC 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See SOC 304.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 305. Asian Pacific American Community Service and Learning.

Section 001 — Asians & Blacks in Detroit. Meets with CAAS 358.001 and History 468.001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/305/001.nsf

See HISTORY 468.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 306 / PSYCH 317. Community Based Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 205. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/di/courses.html

See PSYCH 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 306 / PSYCH 317. Community Based Research.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Phillip M Creekmore

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 205. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/317/002.nsf

See PSYCH 317.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 307 / PSYCH 318. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 306. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/di/courses.html

See PSYCH 318.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 307 / PSYCH 318. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Phillip M Creekmore

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in AMCULT 306. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PSYCH 318.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 — Asian Pacific American Literature and Empire. Meets with ENGLISH 407.002.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu), Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/311/001.nsf

How Does the Empire Write Back? This team-taught, upper-division course focuses on Asian Pacific American literature and the U.S. empire. By reading stories, plays, poems, novels, spoken word, and films, students will learn how empire affects the experience of different generations of Pacific Islanders and Asians in America, focusing especially on Hawaiian, Korean American, Filipino American, Vietnamese American, South Asian American, and Chinese American texts. This diverse range of writers and artists proposes creative ways of thinking beyond, against, and without the U.S. empire. Most importantly, this course will be an opportunity for students to develop their own creative research projects, which will contribute to this body of writing. While students are expected to work on individual research topics from the very beginning of the course, the last third of the academic term is set aside for the development and presentation of projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 314 / HISTORY 378. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/314/001.nsf

This course provides an overview of Asian/Pacific American history from the time of early migrations to the present. Groups to be examined include Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Southeast Asian, Pacific Islander, Chinese, and Japanese Americans. We will place these experiences into a national and international context of comparative race relations and U.S.-Asia relations. Our study will begin with the questions: What does it mean to study history from an Asian/Pacific American perspective? How and why has Asian/Pacific American history become a part of the curriculum?

Readings and lectures will engage the following historical issues and themes:

  1. pre-World War II immigration and efforts to build community in the face of racial exclusion;
  2. the place of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the construction of the U.S. empire;
  3. the changing demographics and community composition created by post-1965 immigration;
  4. the impact of the Vietnam War and the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees;
  5. the construction of gender and the experience of women in Asian/Pacific American communities;
  6. the shifting position of Asian/Pacific American labor in the capitalist economy;
  7. the emergence of Asian/Pacific American activism in the fight for social justice.

Course requirements include an in-class final exam plus oral and written assignments related to course themes. Students enroll in the lecture and one discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

AMCULT 325 / ENGLISH 388. Pacific Literary and Cultural Studies.

Section 001 — Pacific Island Worlds.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu), Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course for students who want to develop their abilities in critical and creative reading, thinking, and analysis. It is an interdisciplinary course that navigates film, fiction, poetry, hip-hop, novels, and histories in order to engage with some of the critical processes at work in the modern world. From sunlit beaches, swaying palm trees, and happy tourists to tropical rainforest and menacing natives, the islands of the Pacific have been relentlessly depicted. Perhaps more than any other region of the globe, the islands have been "experienced" beforehand through the image-making of Hollywood, television, and advertisement. The huge success of films such as Whale Rider, The Piano, Lord of the Rings, and Once Were Warriors builds upon the early images of the region in films such as Blue Hawai'i or South Pacific. This course puts such texts into dialogue with the extensive body of historical and literary representations. What sorts of connections emerge when we read popular culture in relation to the actual early historical accounts of contact between islanders and European explorers such as Cook, Bougainville, and Bligh and fictional representations by Herman Melville, Patricia Grace, and Keri Hulme? What accounts for these connections and disjunctions in what have usually been thought of as inhabiting the separate realms of "high" and "low" or "popular" and "academic" culture? The works we will study are by outsiders as well as Pacific Islanders themselves. Through analysis of these texts, we will develop a critical sense of how the Pacific Islands were understood and experienced, today and in the past, in the Pacific Islands and beyond. What kind of worlds did, and do, people live in, imagine, and construct? How can we learn about them, analyze them, appreciate them? Come and learn as we chart a way through these Pacific Island worlds . . .

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 339 / ANTHRCUL 339. American Religious Movements.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 339.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

AMCULT 341(430) / WOMENSTD 330. Feminist Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melanie Anne Boyd (maboyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 240 and one additional WOMENSTD course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 330.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente M Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor . OPEN TO AMERICAN CULTURE CONCENTRATORS ONLY.

AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/374/001.nsf

Freedom Rides, Classic Rock, Motown, Vietnam, The Draft, Woodstock, Hippies, and the Great Society. The "Sixties" have a mythic quality in our political and cultural life. The current debate over the 1960's and the history of that decade mirror the very essence of American culture. This is the decade of peace, optimism, cultural turbulence, despair, war, and frustration. It was a time when basic assumptions and institutions were challenged.

This course will explore the nature of American society through a look at the social and cultural movements of the 1960's. Specific attention will be paid to changes in race relations and racial structures in the nation. Specifically, we will examine the relationship between political and cultural change during that decade. How did movements for political and social change affect the nation's political upheavals? What were the relationships between the decade's demographic and cultural changes and the political upheavals of the time? What role did resistance to political and cultural change during the 1960's play in the development of the conservative political and cultural movements that have been so influential in the decades since.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

AMCULT 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department. OPEN TO AMERICAN CULTURE HONORS STUDENTS ONLY.

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: AMCULT 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

AMCULT 458 / WOMENSTD 458. Gender and Race and the Christian Right.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Lee Smith (tsalagi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how the politics of gender and race intersect within current configurations of the Christian Right and conservative evangelicalism. We will begin with an overview of the history of the Christian Right and its relationship to conservative evangelicalism and the secular right. We will then investigate how the politics of gender and race are evolving within the Christian Right, with a particular focus on how they intersect with each other. Issues we will explore will include the changing definitions of "male headship," and the rhetoric of "race reconciliation" within the Christian Right. We will devote some particular attention to two case studies: the Promise Keepers and the Christian Coalition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of AMCULT 493, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 — Immigrant and Racial Politics After September 11th. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Nadine Naber (ncnaber@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/496/001.nsf

This course explores the impact of September 11th on U.S. communities of color comparatively. The course highlights shifts in immigrant rights, civil rights, women's rights, and the politics of "race" after September 11th. Students will grapple with the racialization of religion and the racialization of belonging and non-belonging. Students will address new shifts in pre-existing polarizations between Christians and Muslims and citizens and non-citizens.

This course also addresses new forms of community-based activism and resistance after September 11th. Central to this course will be the transformative possibilities of coalition building. Students will focus on new points of unity and new points of tension within and between communities of color, with a focus on women of color feminist politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 — Contemporary Issues in Native America. [3 credits]. Meets with HISTORY 393.002.

Instructor(s): Judith Daubenmier (jdaubenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/496/002.nsf

White Americans once thought Native Americans were a vanishing people, but Native Americans remain a vibrant part of the country's life. This course looks at a range of issues that confront many Indians and Indian communities today. Who is an Indian? How should Indians be portrayed in film and other media? How much freedom should Native American communities have to run their own affairs without outside interference? How should Native American communities provide for the economic development of their reservations? The course will consider these questions and others in a seminar setting emphasizing discussion of readings and writing. Prerequisites: None.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 — Stories of Change: American Left & the American Right. [4 Credits]. Meets with History 397.004.

Instructor(s): Martha Eugenia Deerman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 397.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 — Stories of Change: American Women's Movements. [4 Credits]. Meets with History 397.005.

Instructor(s): Martha Eugenia Deerman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTORY 397.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 — Space, Archaeology & Afro-American Identity. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.001 and ARCH 409.001.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu), Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee may be required.

R&E

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/498/001.nsf

Built environments and architectural practice have segregated African bodies within Western societies and literally "set in stone" racial hierarchies invented in the wake of the transatlantic slave trade. This course examines the ways in which African American identities have been constructed around spatially contingent notions of race, gender, and nationhood. In addition to architectural explorations, we will also examine the works of James Baldwin, whose prose interrogates complex underpinnings of twentieth-century Americanness. Baldwin's texts will thus provide a rich narrative context for reading the spaces and architectural forms framing African American identity from the times of slavery, through segregation, and more recent racial strife in American urban centers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 — Interactions & Frictions in World Cinema/Media : Circumnavigating the Atlantic: Cinema, Exile, Diaspora. [3 credits]. Meets with FILMVID 485.001.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu), Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/485/001.nsf

See FILMVID 485.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


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