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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 8:10 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



ANTHRBIO 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/161/001.nsf

What is the material basis of evolution? How have humans evolved? Why do humans behave in the manner that they do? This course seeks answers to these enduring questions. The course will be divided into three parts. We will begin by reviewing the theory of evolution and examining how evolution produces adaptations and creates new species. This section will conclude by outlining how evolution has shaped the behavior of our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates. The second part of the class will be devoted to investigating the human fossil record and tracing the physical and behaviroal evolution of our species. The course will conclude by asking how evolution has affected contemporary human behavior. The emphasis throughout will be on the processess that have shaped human evolution and how these have produced who we are. The course includes three lectures plus one discussion/lab meeting per week. Grades will be based on three midterms and GSI evaluation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 362. Problems of Race.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles L Brace (clbrace@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The subject matter covered in this course is different from but complementary to that covered in ANTHRCUL 347, "Race and Ethnicity", which is more concerned with race relations. ANTHRBIO 362 addresses itself to two main problem areas where race is concerned:

  1. the common concept of race has an inadequate foundation in biology and must be dispensed with before we can make sense out of the very real aspects of human biological variation.

    This portion of the course treats the dimensions of human biological differences that can be traced according to selective force distributions and their changes through time. These will be contrasted with the biological traits that show regional clustering but which have no adaptive value and cannot therefore be hierarchically arranged.

  2. If the common concept of race has an inadequate biological base, how did we get stuck with our generally held assumptions when it would appear that they owe more to folklore than to biology?

    This portion of the course deals principally with the history of the race concept.

All the material covered by the course will be dealt with in lecture. Supplementary readings will be suggested from time to time, along with specific sections in the assigned texts.

Texts:
C.L.Brace, THE STAGES OF HUMAN EVOLUTION 5 ed. and
Stephen Molnar, HUMAN VARIATION 5 ed. will be available at Michigan Book and Supply at 317 S. State. Lecture outlines (syllabus) and
C.L.Brace, RACE IS A FOUR LETTER WORD will be available at Dollar Bill Copying 611 Church Street.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 364. Nutrition and Evolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andres R Frisancho (arfrisan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/364/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 371. Techniques in Biological Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 399. Honors in Biological Anthropology and Anthropology/Zoology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seniors who choose to enter the honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior honors program should consult with the departmental honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the College Honors Program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRBIO 467. Human Behavioral Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew F Richards (psupie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A strong background in the natural sciences is assumed, including any two of the following courses: ANTHRBIO 161, 368; BIOLOGY 162; MCDB 404; EEB 494. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/467/001.nsf

This lecture and lab course aims to presents a synthetic account of the evolution of human traits using an adaptationist approach. The large brains and powerful cognitive abilities of humans are viewed as adaptations to a co-evolving complex social environment, rather than as adaptations to a non-social environment (e.g., tool technology, hunting, extractive foraging), or side-effects of other "trends" (e.g., allometry), or the result solely of sexual selection for "good genes". In particular, humans have evolved to cooperate in complex ways — in order to compete with each other (as coalition against coalition) for resources, power, and ultimately reproduction. We also will cover the evolution of such associated physiological, psychological, and cultural phenomena as group living, concealed ovulation, sexuality and mate choice, male parental investment, infant altriciality, learning ability, emotional expression, reciprocity, "theory of mind", morality, war, business, science, and the demographic transition. We will read mostly from the primary scientific literature (in a course pack), both theoretical and empirical, in order to learn what evolutionary hypotheses have been applied to humans, how these hypotheses have been tested, and to think critically and scientifically about claims about humans. A weekly lab provides hands-on experience of selection, demography, life history, and games of cooperation. Evaluation will be via a midterm, several short essays, lab exercises, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRBIO 562. Human Nature.

Section 001 — Human Reproductive Ecology.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRBIO 467 and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/562/001.nsf

This is a graduate-level seminar on human reproductive ecology. We will read technical, scientific articles that assume a strong background in biology as well as evolutionary theory: Sample questions include: Why did menstruation and menopause evolve? Does menstrual synchrony exist? Does female sexuality change at the time of ovulation? What adaptations influence female fertility? What progress has been made in understanding male reproductive ecology? We will also explore diverse cultural practices that constrain female sexuality. Grading will be based on class participation and one paper. Permission of instructor is required for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 564. Hominid Origins.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRBIO 351, 365 or 466, or an advanced course in evolution. Primarily for biological anthropology concentrators. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/564/001.nsf

This course is about the origin of the human species and the life history of the earliest type of human — Australopithecus. It examines the ancestry of the hominids, the various theories of their origin, and aspects of australopithecine evolution such as their locomotion, behavior, adaptations, and taxonomy. Emphasis is placed on the application of evolutionary theory to species origins and mode of evolution, the biomechanical links of form to function, and the importance of the discovery of stone tools. The format includes lectures and a laboratory session. Evaluations are based on a paper, final exam, and laboratory tests and assignments. Prerequisite: ANTHRBIO 351, 365 or equivalent or more advanced course in evolution.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRBIO 566. Laboratory in Human Osteology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrbio/566/001.nsf

The course is concerned with the identification and interpretation of human skeletal remains. Emphasis is placed on both the individual and populational levels of interpretation. Topics include the basic biology of normal bone, pathology, and variation in form. Identification and reconstruction of fragmentary materials as well as reconstruction of populational characteristics (age, sex, life history data, metric description) are covered. It is specifically designed for archaeologists and biological anthropologists but also would be of use to pre-dental and pre-medical students who will take gross anatomy in the future. The course is limited to 20 students. Four scheduled hours, and additional laboratory time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor


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