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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 7:01 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/101/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology and biological anthropology. It emphasizes a set of fundamental concerns: the nature of culture, human variation and universals, cultural relativism and how knowledge of evolution and pre-history inform our understanding of what it means to be human. Specific topics include: primate (monkey and ape) behavior, evolution and the concept of race; the origins of agriculture and the rise of social complexity; language and culture, kinship and family, sex and gender roles, ethnicity, and religion; and the emergence of the world system, culture and political economy, and globalization. This course is intended to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that characterize the discipline. It stresses the unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students new ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Required readings include an introductory text and several paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (primarily multiple choice), each covering one-half of the term; the second exam will be given on the final day of class. Section leaders require several short papers (no more than ten pages total) and other brief assignments or quizzes. Texts: Kottak, Conrad. (2003) Anthropology: The Exploration of Human Diversity, 10th ed.; Bowen, Eleanor. (Laura Bohannan) (1964) Return to Laughter. NY: Doubleday.; Basso, Keith (1996) Wisdom Sits in Places. Albuequerque: University of New Mexico Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/101/026.nsf

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There will be four short papers due in section, and section leaders may have other requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001 — The Anthropology of Media.

Instructor(s): Kelly Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/158/001.nsf

This seminar poses an anthropological critique of the ways in which media technologies (photography, radio, television, film, audiocassettes, newspapers, the Internet, etc.) are used to represent and construct cultures. We will question how mass media all too often constitute "masked" media in their tendencies to submerge and suppress differences while producing stereotypes and formulaic representations. We will also explore, however, how people employ media technologies to interrogate, subvert, and redefine existing conventions. Our goal in this seminar is to "break up the 'massness' of the media" (Ginsburg 1994) by recognizing the complex ways — the culturally and historically differentiated ways — in which people are engaged in the processes of media production, representation, distribution, and reception.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 002 — People in Movement.

Instructor(s): Janet Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar invites participants to think about the vast mosaic of people in motion. Moving persons may be engaged in tourism, discovery, transhumance (cattle herding), escape, protest, war, routine business, or fortune seeking. Moving (and relocated, even temporarily) people encounter a range of possibilities for the adaptation and transformation of identity and culture. Anthropologists have focused attention on various aspects of "the movement question," from migration and pilgrimage to recently, globalization and tourism. We will read about and discuss the many intriguing aspects of movement from an ethnographic standpoint.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 202. Ethnic Diversity in Japan.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/202/001.nsf

This course begins with an overview of popular and anthropological ideas and theories about human diversty. Japanese ideas of "race" and "ethnicity" are analyzed comparatively. We then explore the history and cultures of Japanese ethnic groups and minorities. Among the groups we will focus on are the ("aboriginal") Ainu, resident Koreans, migrant workers (of Japanese ancestry) from South America, so-called "international marriages" and children of mixed parentage, Burakumin ("outcastes"), "sexual minorities" (i.e., gays, lesbians, bisexuals), and others. Anthropological readings are augmented by novels and short stories, comics, videos, and films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 222. The Comparative Study of Cultures.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/222/001.nsf

Culture is frequently offered to explain why people differ from each other, yet the conditions under which people live are often ignored. This course explores how social life is organized and understood in a variety of societies and asks how meaning is constructed historically. Topics which will be considered include: race, gender, religion, personhood, ethics, and human rights. Readings will center on in-depth studies of several communities as well as on ethical controversies. The texts include studies of the following: an indigenous Peruvian village and the exchange of coca leaves; Afro-Caribbean spiritual practices in Haiti, Cuba, and the U.S.; Amazonian indigenous peoples and human rights; healing beliefs among the Hmong in Laos and communities in the U.S.

Classes will be organized around the discussion of texts, films, and supplementary materials, and will include student group presentations. Students are expected to attend regularly and to be prepared to participate in class. Written assignments consist of several commentaries, a group presentation, and two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 226 / HISTORY 229. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David E Pedersen (pedersen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the principal concerns of cultural anthropology has been to discover, document, and interpret differences and similarities across cultures. Historical anthropology similarly looks at differences and similarities in the ways in which people understand the past, use the past, and assign different meanings to the past in different societies around the world. While we generally believe that "history" is both an academic discipline and a chronological narrative about important events, those of us who study historical anthropology find that this is not a shared understanding of history throughout the world. People secure memories of the past in different ways: in some societies written sources are most important, for other societies it is the storyteller who guards memories of the past, for other societies tools of remembering are found in the environment, in buildings, and in other material forms. Some societies highly value special guardians of history, others don't. Does this mean that the past is more important to some societies rather than others? Do people actually remember differently or only use different tools to remember? And what is memory anyway? An account that conforms to one's present identity or an accurate assessment of the past? This course will address the power of the past, looking at why and how contemporary social demands and political battles are fought on the terrain of history and what we choose to remember and systematically forget about it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 256 / ENVIRON 256 / NRE 256. Culture, Adaptation, and Environment.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca D Hardin (rdhardin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENVIRON 256.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 272 / LING 272. Language in Society.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Patrick Herron (jherron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/272/001.nsf

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in comparative social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include:

  • What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How and to what extent does speaking a particular language construct a culturally specific model of the social and natural world, a sense of 'reality'?
  • How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class and gender?
  • How do linguistic practices and perceptions of language reinforce social divisions and relationships of unequal power?

In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how linguistic practices contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. We will consider how judgments about "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" speech are ultimately grounded in social rather than linguistic factors.

Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are:

  • Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change;
  • the relationship between language and social life, particularly relations of race, class and gender;
  • issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development of official and unofficial standard languages, and the social consequences of language change and language death.

Throughout the course, we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this class. Requirements for the class include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include textbook(s) and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 317 / REES 397. Eastern Europe in Transformation.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 — Political Economy of E Europe.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 396.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/317/001.nsf

See REES 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 320. Mexico: Culture and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/320/001.nsf

This course will look at contemporary Mexican culture and society and will ask how culture and national identity in Mexico have been historically and socially constructed over the past century. Since at least the 1920s, Mexican intellectuals have used the methods of cultural anthropology to define Mexican culture and national identity. These writers have been in partial dialogue with U.S. anthropologists who have done ethnography in Mexico over the same period. We will draw on some of the key works written on Mexico and Mexicans from both sides of the border, and will test the limits of our ability to understand the powerful but elusive concept of Mexican culture. Themes to be covered include: the search for a Mexican identity; cultural variations among Mexicans; region, "race," and ethnicity in the construction of Mexican culture; gendered views of Mexicanness and Mexican culture; urban and rural views of the nation; and the disparate impact of globalization, transnational migration, and transculturation on Mexico.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 324(420). Anthropology of Contemporary American Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Peter Richardson (peterric@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/324/001.nsf

Americans find frontiers everywhere: frontiers define our historical imagination, but also how we think of our future. Everything from our genes, through hyperspace, to outer space are frontiers and modeled through frontier imagery. Yet frontiers aren't merely representations; they are lived by and through — wound into our lives and practices. This course will begin with a historical anthropological exploration of the origins of the frontier trope. We will trace that trope's transfiguration into new realms (e.g., science and cyberspace) and continuing influence upon dominant symbols (such as labor and nature) within the contemporary American experience. In the process, this course will explore a range of interdisciplinary sources and methodologies available to anthropological exploration. Film, song, fiction, poetry, and even cartoons will be part of this course. Students will be expected to have a grasp of cultural anthropology's core concepts; previous coursework in anthropology is highly recommended. Students will be evaluated based upon completion of two short response papers, two exams, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 338. The Arts in Anthropological Perspective.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222 or sophomore standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/338/001.nsf

This course will introduce students to anthropological perspectives on the arts. We will explore both current and historical models that consider the arts as objects/events and social processes. Among the topics to be discussed are: aesthetics, representation, commercialization, art in the service of power (royal regalia, praise-singers, colonialism), embodied art, and art as a mode of resistance. Case studies will be drawn from regions around the world and encompass a variety of genres including music, dance, poetry, theater, and the visual arts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 339 / AMCULT 339. American Religious Movements.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The U.S. has a history of indigenous life, colonialism, and postcolonialism not unlike the histories of many other countries worldwide. Yet American society has also been shaped by in-migration on a scale almost unmatched elsewhere, especially since the Immigration Reform Act of 1965. Even before the separations of church and state, nationally, then state by state, during the 18th and 19th centuries, the search for religious freedom was a major reason why people migrated to the U.S. The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduates to the astonishing religious diversity in the U.S. and the surprising persistance of religious fervor, coexisting alongside a wide variety of secularist views, and to explore some analytical problems from an anthropological perspective, based on library research and first-hand ethnographic research. These problems will focus especially on the social organization of religious pluralism, especially cultural ideas and practices concerning bigotry and tolerance.

This is a lecture-discussion course in which students can expect lots of reading; one, perhaps more, oral presentation/s to the class on the reading; an essay-style midterm exam; and a final paper, based on library research and first-hand ethnographic research. Besides 3 hpw (3 credits) of lecture, this course includes 2 hpw of lab (1 credit), in which students will learn and practice ethnographic methods of gathering data that are reliable and replicable, providing the basis for the final paper. Grades will be based on the midterm exam and the final paper; class presentation/s; and contributions to class discussions. The required reading will be a book each week, or 3-4 articles/week. The books will be available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 State Street), and on reserve in the Undergraduate Library. A course pack of articles will be available from Excel (South University St.). Class size: 50 students. Preference will be given to students who have had at least one course in Anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 344(444). Medical Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden (hollypet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/344/001.nsf

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This course will examine beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers will be explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we will also draw upon examples from Western biomedicine — among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorders, schizophrenia — to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 347 / CAAS 420. Race and Ethnicity.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a comparative analysis of race and ethnicity as social and political phenomena with emphasis on the current theoretical literature. It analyzes the criteria by which different peoples classify races and/or ethnic groups; the implications of these classifications for intergroup relations; and the study of how attitudes and values surrounding race and ethnicity have shaped contemporary world events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 357. Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Pacific Places and Routes: Culture & History in Oceania. [Honors]. Meets with HONORS 493.003.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu), Vicente Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines culture and history in the Pacific. We will compare how places become meaningful to patterns in the circulation of people, ideas, and things. Examples include the spatial forms of history and memory in Papua New Guinea, mythological landscapes in Aboriginal Australia, the knowledge and practices of navigation and seafaring in Micronesia and Polynesia, mapmaking of various kinds, the management of long-distance exchange networks, and the experiences of empire, globalization, and diaspora. Taught by an historian and an anthropologist, this interdisciplinary course will examine how Pacific ideas about places and routes contribute to our understandings of history and culture. Readings include several monographs, a short text on maps, and a course pack of articles. Requirements include regular attendance and participation, a midterm exam, several short discussion papers, a brief presentation, and a short research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 370 / LING 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rustyb/370/

See LING 370.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 — Honors Ethnology.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/399/001.nsf

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in a seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We also will explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 411 / CAAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. CAAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting, and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa. Topics covered include: the historical geography of Africa; pre-colonial and colonial roots of contemporary African state-societies; case studies of changing systems of kinship, marriage, family and gender relations; race, ethnicity, language, class and the dynamics of cultural, national and pan-African identity; religion, music, dance, and the arts in contemporary Africa; globalization and the challenge of African development. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Grades are based on four 5-6 page, type-written, take-home papers, and contributions to class discussion. Film/videos shown in class when available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East.

The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories, and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics.

The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth.

The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization.

The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment.

The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 — Meets with CAAS 458.006.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 455 / WOMENSTD 455. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/455/001.nsf

How are gender and power related? How do feminist theories affect the way reseach is carried out? This course analyzes gender as an integral dimension of social life in a variety of local, national, and global settings. It examines the conditions under which masculinity and femininity have been historically defined in differing cultures, and the institutional and discursive parameters within which men and women live and act. The class will combine lecture, discussion, and student presentations. It will draw on a variety of theoretical, ethnographic and visual materials relating to Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Students will make class presentations and write short commentaries, as well as a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Multilingualism:Societies&Prac. Meets with ANTHRCUL 675.001 and LING 492.001/792.001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu) , Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/001.nsf

This seminar has two distinct components. The first involves a series of readings and discussions designed to introduce students to the study of societal multilingualism, including bilingualism. Although multilingualism is of interest to scholars working in many different disciplines and subfields, we shall approach the topic chiefly from the overlapping perspectives of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. A range of definitions and descriptions of bi- and multilingualism will be considered, and the associated phenomena of bidialectalism and diglossia discussed. Major topics covered will include language practices and patterns of language shift in migrant multilingual communities; language maintenance, language shift and language death. An important theme throughout will be language choice and language mixing practices of multilinguals, and the associated problematic distinction between code-switching and borrowing. We shall look particularly carefully at the pragmatic functions of code-switching, and assess some accounts of the ways in which speakers use the codes available to them as a conversational resource. We shall also consider how speakers conceive of the multilingual environment, the codes at their disposal, and the practices in which those codes are deployed.

The second part of the seminar is a research component. As a class project, we will conduct a pilot investigation of language use among Senegalese migrants in Southeast Michigan, with the aim of comparing migrants' linguistic repertoires with repertoires reported for Senegal itself. Students will be able to participate in a manner consistent with their intellectual goals and interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 — Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner (spastner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship — an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations, and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes. In addition to the required texts and "course pack", students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 — Indians and Anthropologists.

Instructor(s): Barbra A Meek (bameek@umich.edu), Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/003.nsf

"Indians and Anthropologists" explores the complex and at times contentious relationship between the indigenous peoples of North America and the anthropologists who study them. Our discussions begin with the very public and candid Native American critique of anthropology, which charges that anthropologists (called "anthros") are scientists whose perspectives are biased by colonial and often racist assumptions. This criticism originally took anthropologists by surprise because they saw themselves as preserving and promoting a greater understanding of Native American cultures. To contextualize this critique, we briefly review the history of anthropology in North America and examine changes in the field over the past three decades. Next, we examine topics that have recently sparked debate between Native communities and anthropologists, such as the legal controversy over the remains of "Kennewick Man," claims for cannibalism in the Ancient American Southwest, and representations of Native Americans in natural history museums. Finally, we will explore joint ventures and partnerships that have recently emerged between anthropologists and Native North America communities.

Students will learn about the on-going dialogue and debates between "Indians" and "Anthros" through lectures, student-led discussions, and articles by historians, Native authors, and anthropologists in all four subfields (cultural, biological, linguistic, and archaeology). Several guest speakers will provide their personal perspectives on working with Native American communities. Students will integrate information learned in the classroom to real-world experiences through three writing assignments, including attendance at the University of Michigan Pow Wow. The text for this course is Indians and Anthropologists: Vine Deloria, Jr. and the Critique of Anthropology edited by Biolsi and Zimmerman, which will be supplemented by articles in a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 — Anthropology & North American Agriculture.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Whether or not they've felt the scratch of straw under their collars at haying season or busted a combine's header against a fieldstone at harvest, many Americans shape a part of their identity in terms of an agricultural past. These stories may be personal and familial or part of a larger national narrative. This seems to be true even though fewer than two percent of Americans are engaged in farming today. This course will be an exploration of the connections among farming as a key cultural symbol for American self- and moral-construction, the political economy of agriculture, and such currents as rural radicalism and the new agrarianism. The course will include attention to anthropological approaches to agriculture, historical themes connecting American agriculture to the moral self, and their relevance to understanding contemporary farming life in the United States. Approaches will span the anthropology of work, of kinship, of place, and of moral systems. There will be an emphasis (but not a limitation) on ethnographic materials from the Midwest and Great Plains. The course is organized as a seminar incorporating a balance of lecture and discussion. Among the required texts are Wendell Berry's The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture (3rd edition, 1996, Sierra Club Books), Kathryn Dudley's Debt and Dispossession: Farm Loss in America's Heartland (2000, University of Chicago Press), and Catherine Stock's Rural Radicals: Righteous Rage in the American Grain (1996, Cornell University Press). In addition to these and other books, there will be readings available on a course web page and other readings handed out in class. Students will be graded on the basis of class participation and discussion, on two book review essays, and two essay tests for a total of about 25 pages of written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 006 — Race and Displacement. Meets with CAAS 458.004.

Instructor(s): Damani Partridge (djpartri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In using autobiography, theoretical engagement, audio-visual representations and ethnographic accounts, this course will examine the meanings and modes of displacement by looking at racial formations in a global context. We will look at both the shifts of meanings and the everyday borrowings of "racial" categories, while examining discourses of difference and exclusion. What are the limits and possibilities of these discourses? What are the relationships between "race" and belonging? How does the politicization of racialized categories differ as one changes context, from post-socialism to post-colonialism to ethno-nationalism?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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