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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies


This page was created at 7:13 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



ASIAN 203 / HISTART 203. Chinese Art and Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 203.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 205(122) / HISTORY 205. Modern East Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Lee (jql@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/205/001.nsf

See HISTORY 205.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ASIAN 220 / RELIGION 202. Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrick Arthur Pranke (ppranke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/220/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the study of Asian religions. We will consider representative material drawn from some of the major Asian traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, etc.), from ancient times down to the present day. The course, however, is not intended to be a comprehensive or systematic survey; rather than aiming at breadth, the course is designed around major conceptual themes, such as ritual, death, image veneration, mysticism, meditation, ancestor worship, religious violence, and so on. The overarching emphasis throughout the course will be on the hermeneutic difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in general, and Asian religious traditions in particular.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 221 / GTBOOKS 221. Great Books of China.

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Chinese is not required. Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/gtbooks/221/001.nsf

See GTBOOKS 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 223 / RELIGION 223. Bhagavad-Gita: The Activist View of Hinduism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madhav Deshpande (mmdesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class introduces Hinduism to students through an intensive study of this single most important scriptural text, the Bhagavad-Gita. We spend half the time going over the text-in-translation, chapter by chapter. The other half of the class time is devoted to critical issues relating to the text, i.e., history of the text, its transmission, its location within the history of Hinduism, its connections with political/cultural history, its ancient and modern interpretations. The grade is based on class participation, two papers, and two in-class examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 226. Other Hearts and Other Minds: Poetries of Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/226/001.nsf

ASIAN 226 will introduce first-year students to traditions of poetic theory and practice in times and places distant from their own: the poetries of China, Korea, Japan, India, and Indonesia. The primary objective of the course is to explore a range of different conceptions of what poetry is, how it should form (or transform) the ways in which people interpret their lives, and what relation it should have to other parts of social life. As this is a seminar, an equally important objective of the course is to assist students in developing techniques and habits of research. At least once during the course each student will give the class a half hour biographical/historical introduction to a poet or set of poets. The instructor and visiting faculty discuss poetry and poets in more abstract terms. Shorter written assignments build on the interplay of specific poet or poem and general questions explored by the course. (Translation or transcreation will be an option for one of these assignments.) There will be two exams or one exam and one longer paper. On completing this cross-cultural exploration the student should also have a more informed and more articulate conception of the poetry he or she has grown up with. Undergraduates with an interest in Asia and poetry. 3 hours a week. The course, depending on enrollment, will be taught in a lecture format.

At least once during the course each student will give the class a half hour biographical/historical introduction to a poet or set of poets. The instructor and visiting faculty discuss poetry and poets in more abstract terms. Shorter written assignments build on the interplay of specific poet or poem and general questions explored by the course. (Translation or transcreation will be an option for one of these assignments.) There will be two exams or one exam and one longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 251. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Section 001 — History of Chinese Science. Taught in English

Instructor(s): Miranda Brown (mdbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in pre-modern Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics. In addition to examining the content of Chinese science, we will also explore religious, philosophical, social, political, and cultural factors that contributed (or hampered) the development of science. Some questions that we will pursue: What were Chinese attitudes towards nature and the past and how did they differ from those in the West? Why did the Science Revolution not happen in China (or did it)? Readings will focus on primary source materials (in translation). Students will give oral presentations and write several short papers. No knowledge of Chinese or Chinese history is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 001 — Stage & Spectacle in Early-Modern Japan.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Zwicker (jzwicker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jzwicker/teaching/stageandspectacle.html

This undergraduate seminar will introduce students to the dramatic texts and practices of Japan's early-modern period (1600-1900).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 253. Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture.

Section 001 — Religion in Modern India. Meets with Honors 251.001.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of any Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee may be required.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the diversity of religious life in modern India. It will begin with the examination of the following three points, namely, (1) that ancient layers of India's religious life are alive and well in contemporary India; (2) that the hybrid discourse of the "secular state" is itself a religious discourse in modern India; and (3) that India's unique agony over religion is instructive for rethinking some of our most general notions about "religion" and "secularization." In this course we will discuss the overall periodization of the various layers of India's religious life, namely,

  1. the Indus Valley (c. 3000-1500 BCE)
  2. the Indo-Brahmanical (c. 1500-600 BEC)
  3. the Indo-Sramanical (c.600 BCE-300BCE)
  4. the Indic (Hindu-Buddhist-Jain) (c. 300-1200)
  5. the Indo-Islamic (c.1200-1757)
  6. the Indo-Anglian (c. 1757-present).

We will then apply the overall analysis to the five salient religious crises in contemporary India: the Sikhs in the Punjab, the Muslim issue in Kashmir, the Shah Banno case and the Muslim Women's Bill, the Mandal Commission Report on Other Backward Classes, and the controversy in Ayodhya. We will also examine the role of ethnic and racial conflicts that led to these crises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 302(402). Rewriting Identities in Modern Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken K Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory course to modern Japanese fiction examines how novels and short stories written after 1868 engage the issue of national, cultural, and social identities. The inquiry in the course will simultaneously move in two directions: We will examine how fiction written in an age of national print-capitalism participates in the work of building a shared understanding of a nation and its people. But we will also see how the same fiction can spotlight divisions of gender, sexual orientation, class, generation, and region. Using the fiction written by some of the best known of Japanese writers — Mori Ogai, Natsume Soseki, Kawabata Yasunari, Mishima Yukio, and Oe Kenzaburo — the course will pursue its inquiries on both formal and thematic levels. Attention will be paid to how different narrative genres and techniques either erase or emphasize social differences.

  • How do Japanese novels help to construct what Benedict Anderson would call the "imagined community" of the nation?
  • By what process does Japanese become a "national print language" appropriate for fictional writing?
  • How is the Japanese "self" narrated into being?
  • How are competing visions of what is "modern" and "traditional" addressed in the search for identity?
  • How does fiction, written by male and female writers, address the selfhood of Japanese men and women?

These are the questions that we will ask as we traverse the contested terrain of Japanese identities. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required. All readings will be in English translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 360(475) / PHIL 360 / RCHUMS 375 / HISTART 387. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/360/001.nsf

An interdisciplinary, multimedia course taught by faculty specialists from the fields of Chinese philosophy, religion, art history, linguistics, theater, and literature. Not a survey course. The focus will be on the close study of a number of significant and representative works drawn from several humanistic disciplines in order to present the major themes of Chinese civilization, and to observe how they persist or change from the past to the present.

Lecture topics and participating faculty include: Language (W. Baxter); Early culture and Confucianism (M. Brown); Daoism (S. Lin); religion; Art History (Q. Ning, M. Powers); Poetry (S. Lin); Music (J. Lam); Theater and Fiction (D. Rolston); Modern Literature (L. Liu); Film (M. Nornes).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 001 — Jainism: Religion of Nonviolence.

Instructor(s): Donald R Davis, Jr (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/380/001.nsf

As one of the world's oldest religions, Jainism has often been described as an atheistic soteriology, or method of personal salvation. The intense religious, especially ascetic, discipline required of Jain monks and nuns is the most visible symbol of Jainism. The cardinal virtue in this ascetic regimen is ahi sa, or non-violence, which characterizes every action performed by Jain monks and nuns and is held as an ideal for Jain laypeople as well.

Given the emphasis on ascetic practice in Jainism, one may not expect the majority of lay Jains to be merchants who own thriving trading businesses in some of India's largest cities. The contrast, and seeming contradiction, between ascetic ideals and prosperous lives within the theological, ritual, and social frameworks of Jainism will be the principal subject of this course. The early focus will be on Jain theology and philosophy, i.e. those concepts and world-views that Jain leaders have expounded and idealized since the founding of the tradition in the 5th century BC. The second part of the course will shift attention away from the conceptual and theological to the practical and ritual aspects of Jain life in India. In the end, you will have a solid working knowledge of the basic concepts of Jainism as well as a thorough understanding of everyday life in Jain communities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 002 — Pop(ular) Buddhism. Meets with Honors 493.001 and INSTHUM 311.002.

Instructor(s): Donald S Lopez Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See INSTHUM 311.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of instructor

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 003 — Philippine & Filipino American Literature.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the phenomenon of an Asian literary tradition produced from its very inception under conditions of coloniality under Spain from 1521 and the U.S. from 1898. We will address the consequences of the alienation of orality from writing with the destruction of all native written records and the substitution of Spanish and later English as the official spoken and written language. How did the native voice translate its poetry and narrative into the dominant languages while retaining its own diacritical inflexions? What kinds of ruses and masquerades, accommodations and negotiations are involved in the production of a "double" literature that must at once harness and distance itself from the very language of its expression? What are the conditions of (im)possibility for the reception of such a fractured Philippine//American sensibility in metropolitan and academic milieus grounded in the Western and East Asian traditions? How can we revision history, both political and literary, and theory, both ethical and aesthetic, in order to hear the voices of peoples exiled from the mother tongue and the mother land by colonial, postcolonial, and globalizing occupation? Readings will cull from early Spanish colonial writing to Jose Rizal's 19th c. revolutionary novel, Noli me Tangere (1887; in English translation); the U.S.- postcolonial writings of Nick Joaquin (The Woman Who Had Two Navels, 1961) and F. Sionil Jose (Dusk, 1984); the diasporic imaginary in Carlos Bulosan's ethnobiography, America is in the Heart, and Jose Garcia Villa's modernist poetic theater; and the contemporary explosion of Filipino American poetry, narrative, and testimonial. Supplementary texts will include history, criticism, colonial and postcolonial theory, and visual materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 004 — Humor in South Asian Literature.

Instructor(s): Christi Merrill (merrillc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/380/004.nsf

We survey funny, facetious fiction from South Asia starting with 12th century stories translated from Sanskrit rife with talking corpses and greedy monks, to 20th century novels that show the complicated promises and ironies of independence, and end with recent work that shows the comic side of life being South Asian in America. We focus on humor in order to see the ways a literary text in English creates its own distinction between us and them even as it travels across languages, continents and centuries. Students will be asked to articulate their reactions to this material in a series of informal one-page reading responses, as well as a midterm and a final open-book examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 005 — Classical Chinese Philosophy. Meets with PHIL 397.001 and PHIL 463.001.

Instructor(s): Christoph Harbsmeier

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PHIL 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 006 — Buddhism in Southeast Asia (Theravada Buddhism)

Instructor(s): Patrick Arthur Pranke

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/380/006.nsf

This course explores the historical development, doctrines and cultural manifestations of Theravada Buddhism from its origins in ancient India through its elaborations in Sri Lanka and Burma. Attention will be given to the rise of Theravada Buddhist orthodoxy in Sri Lanka and Burma, its interactions with other Buddhist, Brahmanical and indigenous traditions, and its impact on the culture, polity and economy of the regions. The course will conclude with an examination of new movements within Theravada Buddhism in the 20th century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 011 — Cinema, Popular Culture & The Korean War. Meets with FILMVID 366.011.

Instructor(s): Hye Seung Chung (chunghs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to help students gain historical, political, and socio-cultural understanding of the Korean War as depicted in selected cinematic and literary texts produced on both sides of the Pacific. Rather than present a one-sided perspective on the "facts" of the Korean War within a conventional historiographical lens, the course will focus on investigating the ways in which popular culture and mass media (film, television, and literature) have reflected divergent historical interpretations of the war and were instrumental in shaping the cultural memory of the Cold War era. A balanced set of inquiries will be made about the U.S.'s role in the war by counterpoising Hollywood's mainstream narratives with South Korean counter-narratives. Cultural representations of the Korean War will be examined in relation to various historical and social issues such as anti-Communism, American POW debates, the Vietnam War, the U.S. military domination in South Korea, the question of divided families, the desire for reunification, and the North Korean nuclear crisis.

Films to be screened include The Steel Helmet (Samuel Fuller, 1951), The Bridges at Toko-Ri (Mark Robson, 1954), Battle Hymn (Douglas Sirk, 1957), The Stray Bullet (Yu Hyn-mok, 1961), The Manchurian Candidate (John Frankenheimer,1962), The Marines Who Never Return (Yi Man-hi; 1963), M*A*S*H (Robert Altman, 1970), Gilsottum (Im Kwn-t'aek; 1986), White Badge (Chng Chi-ng, 1992), Spring in My Hometown (Yi Kwang-mo, 1998), Shiri (Kang Che-gyu, 1998), Joint Security Area (Pak Ch'an-uk, 2000), and Die Another Day (Lee Tamahori, 2002).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 381. Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): David Lee Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 395. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors candidate in Asian Studies and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of ASIAN 395, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 001 — Mughal India. Meets with HISTORY 456.001.

Instructor(s): Farina Mir

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/456/001.nsf

See HISTORY 456.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 002 — Law & Society in Classical India.

Instructor(s): Donald R Davis Jr (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/455/002.nsf

This seminar course examines the legal tradition known as Hindu law and its place in the social, political, and religious history of India and South Asia. The course aims to introduce students to the complex, but fascinating legal thought of pre-colonial India and to reinterpret the methodologies and theoretical presuppositions of comparative legal studies. Broad questions concerning the relationship of religion and law, the nature of textual authority, jurisprudential commentary, and the role of customary law will be investigated against the background of India's history.

Classic works on Hindu law will be reinterpreted in the light of recent scholarship. Additionally, a representative selection of Sanskrit legal texts, called dharmasastras, including the well-known Laws of Manu will be read in English translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 003 — Chinese History to the Mongols. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Miranda D Brown (mdbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese History. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and material history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogenous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources. There will be no exams, but the final grade will be based on 2 essays (8 pages each), weekly reading logs, class participation, and multiple oral presentations. All welcome. No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 487. Buddhism in India: Its Doctrines and History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Luis Oscar Gómez (lgomez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ASIAN 230. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the history, doctrines, and institutions of Buddhism in India, from it's origins in the fifth century BC to its revival in the second half of the twentieth century. It is designed as a course for beginning M.A. students and upper-level undergraduates. Previous undergraduate course work in Asian Studies and Religion is assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 489. Korean Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eun-Su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ASIAN 220 or 230. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/489/001.nsf

This course surveys the development of Buddhism in Korea from the third century to the present. It will begin with the introduction the doctrines and practices of Chinese Buddhism which hold an important place in the Korean tradition, while examining the transmission and assimilation of Buddhism into Korea. It includes the progression of the development of Korean Buddhism — the rise of sects, indigenous ideas, and the continuity/ discontinuity from the earlier development in China. Focusing on the major thinkers such as Wonhyo, Chinul and others, we will evaluate their contributions to the development of Buddhist doctrines in the East Asia. We will examine the rise of syncretic interpretation of Buddhist ideas in the Choson dynasty as a means of survival during the harsh climate Confucian ideology. We will also consider the Buddhist response to the Japanese advances during the occupation (1905-1945), and will examine the revival of Buddhism in the country as part of rise in nationalistic fervor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 001 — Islamic Movement in Comparative Perspective. [3 credits]. Meets with REES 405.001, AAPTIS 491.002, and MENAS 491.001.

Instructor(s): Alexander D Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See MENAS 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 002 — Vietnam. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): John K Whitmore

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the country of Vietnam. its people, its past and present, and various elements of its society and culture. Invited speakers will address topics of their own specific interests. Community members are invited to join the discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 003 — Music of the Philippines. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 406/506.

Instructor(s): Bernadette Prudente

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/406/001.nsf

The course will cover musical traditions that are characteristic of the different regions of the country. Lectures will focus on the following topics: epic tradition, choral singing, flat gong and bamboo ensembles of the Cordillera; the kulintang, hanging gong ensembles and related music of Mindanao and Sulu; and lowland folk music practices in Luzon and central Philippines. Video and audio recordings collected from field research of the instructor shall complement the discussions. Course requirement: Mid-term exam, Final exam and a term paper OR participation in a public performance. [Note: A student can choose to participate in a public performance of Philippine Music together with the Kulintang class in lieu of a term paper.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 004 — Kulingtang Ensemble. [1 credit]. Meets with ENS 408. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Bernadette Prudente

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Instruction on the Kulintang and its supporting instruments (drum & various hanging gongs). The pieces to be learned will come from the repertoire of the Maguindanaon, T'boli, Manobo, Molbog and Jama Mapun. Course requirement: Participation in a public performance of Philippine Music as final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 005 — Performing the Ramayan in South and Southeast Asia. [3 credits]. Meets with RCHUMS 333.003

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 333.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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