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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Anthropological Archaeology


This page was created at 7:39 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



ANTHRARC 285(ANTHRCUL 285). Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy Elizabeth Lawson (lawsona@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrarc/285/001.nsf

"Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology" examines popular and fantastic interpretations of archaeological remains. These fantastic interpretations are an important part of pop culture, whether as television specials, magazine articles, or web sites. Archaeologists often view such fantastic claims as "pseudoscientific" and treats them as fringe claims. This class will examine the difference in viewpoints between proponents of cult claims and archaeologists. We begin by focusing on how archaeologists conduct scientific analyses and what really constitutes scientific investigation. We will then investigate a series of topics which have inspired cult claims. Topics include the First Americans, the Myth of the Moundbuilders, Ancient Astronauts, and Atlantis. Throughout the course, you will be asked to critically evaluate the evidence and logic of these claims. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section assignments & discussions, and two exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries (2002). A course pack (available at Accu-Copy, 518 E. William) and readings from web sites will supplement the text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 386(ANTHRCUL 386). Early Civilizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Brubaker (robertb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrarc/386/001.nsf

This course examines the long-term development of complex civilizations in the Old and New Worlds. The geographic coverage will include the Near East, Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley and China in the Old World, and South, Central and North America in the New World. Following a discussion of the general principles of cultural evolution, we will consider a series of specific archaeological case studies that reflect prehistoric cultural change. Using a comparative perspective, we will examine and attempt to evaluate some of the theoretical models proposed to explain the rise of early civilizations and reflect on how these ancient societies may provide useful perspectives on some contemporary problems — such as population pressure, ecological degradation, and ethnic conflict. No special background is assumed. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week. Students are evaluated primarily on the basis of three five-page essay exams. In order to fulfill the Sweetland Center upper level writing requirement, each student will also submit at least one rewritten version of each of their exam essays. There will also be several short writing assignments in the discussion sections. Textbook: Patterns in Prehistory, 4th edition, by Robert J. Wenke, Oxford University Press; there will also be a small course pack and/or library reserve readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 399. Honors in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard I Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Honors course sequence in archaeology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in archaeology and who have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the fall academic term (ANTHRARC 398), the students will meet once a week to define research problems in archaeology, to review the intellectual history of American archaeology, to discuss the construction of analytical and mathematical models appropriate for archaeology, and to analyze methods and procedures for solving problems. This seminar provides background which enables students to define a senior Honors thesis project. ONLY STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED ANTHRARC 398 are eligible to enroll in ANTHRARC 399. The second part of the course sequence begins once a thesis topic is selected. Each student in consultation with the Honors advisor may request any Department of Anthropology faculty member to serve as a thesis advisor. Periodically, Honors students convene to discuss together their research progress. At the end of the second term of the Honors sequence, each student writes an Honors thesis and presents a seminar summarizing the project and its conclusions. Original field research, library sources, or collections in the Museum of Anthropology may be used for Honors projects. Prior excavation or archaeological laboratory experience is not required for participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRARC 400(ANTHRCUL 400) / CAAS 405. Field Studies.

Ngayene Field Station. Meets January 5-March 10 in West Africa.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (8). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field Studies course provides students with an opportunity to participate in unique, original, and exciting research in West Africa. Students will be trained in fundamental methods and techniques of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording, data analysis, map drafting. They will participate in an ongoing research project of the "Sine Ngayene Archaeological project" (SNAP) in South Central Senegal, entitled "CRAFT SPECIALIZATION, MORTUARY PRACTICES, AND SOCIAL DIFFERENTIATION: ARCHAEOLOGY OF SENEGAMBIAN MEGALITHS."

Field training is integrated with lectures on archaeological methods and theory, and the Archaeology of West Africa. Data processing sessions introduce students to the analysis of archaeological artifacts, pottery, animal bones, stone tools as well as plant remains. Each student is required to take notes on a daily basis that are read and commented on at the end of each week. The students will later use these notes to write an extensive 30-40 pages report. For those who may be interested a complementary "Archaeology Laboratory Studies" course is offered after the field season. In this sense, students will learn more about the long term curation of archaeological materials in museums contexts.

Course requirements: Daily excavation notes and a 30-40 page research report.

Intended audience: Undergraduates with concentration in Anthropology, Archaeology, Afroamerican and African studies.

Hours per week and Format: Eight hours/day, Five days/week, Ten weeks.

Base: Ngayene Field Station.

Field Season: January 5-March 10.

Cost: $ 2,000 (including airfares, and transportation in Senegal. On the field, housing and food are funded by the project)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 401(ANTHRCUL 401) / CAAS 406. Archaeology Laboratory Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; concurrent enrollment in ANTHRARC 400. (6). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course aims to train students in core archaeological processing of excavated remains. It involves restoration, description, drafting, as well as cataloging. Students must be concurrently enrolled in ANTHRARC 400 in order to take this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 482(480). Topics in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001 — Geology/Archaeology Seminar.

Instructor(s): Josep M Pares (jmpares@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrarc/482/001.nsf

Archaeological Geology has the ultimate objective of gathering and interpreting relevant geological data to aid in archaeological interpretation. Specifically, the objectives of archaeological geology are documenting site stratigraphy, determining site formation, and reconstructing both the landscape and how people interacted with the land. It encompasses the entire spectrum of techniques and concepts of the geosciences that can be applied to archaeological research. This includes contributions from stratigraphy, sedimentology, pedology, chronostratigraphy, petrology, geomorphology, neotectonics, geophysics, and geochemistry. Method of instruction includes lectures, laboratory, and a paper presentation. Course grade will be based primarily on a final project, one exam, and laboratory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRARC 490(ANTHRCUL 387). Prehistory of North America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101 or ANTHRARC 282. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are introduced to the diversity of prehistoric Native American cultures in North America, with emphasis on the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Great Basin, and Southwest. Twelve thousand years of accommodations to diverse natural and social environments are covered, starting with the initial peopling of the Americas and ending with early contacts between Europeans and Native Americans. Topics of special interest include the extinction of mammoths, mastodons, and other megafauna at the end of the Pleistocene or "Ice Age"; changing hunter-gatherer adaptations leading to the independent domestication of several seed-bearing plants and the origins of agriculture; the development of organizationally complex societies, often called chiefdoms, in the Southeast and southern Midwest; and the devastating impact of European exploration and colonization on the cultures of Native North America. Requirements include three in-class "hourly" exams (there will be no final examination). Required readings include two texts and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 491(ANTHRCUL 491). Prehistory of the Central Andes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ANTHRCUL 101, ANTHRARC 282, or junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the development of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations from the terminal Pleistocene (ca. 13,000 years ago) through the European contact period (16th century A.D.). Major emphasis is on the archaeological study of increasingly complex society after ca. 3000 B.C. in the region between central Chile and Colombia. One previous course in basic anthropology is desirable. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a take-home midterm exam (25%), a take-home final exam (50%), and a 10-15 page term paper (25%). Textbook: Indigenous South Americans of the Past and Present: An Ecological Perspective, by David J. Wilson, Westview Press. 1999. There is a small course pack of relevant journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRARC 499(ANTHRCUL 499). Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


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