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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Archaeology


This page was created at 7:01 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CLCIV 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CLCIV 101 is offered in the Fall and CLCIV 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies — literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (CLARCH 221 — offered in the Fall) and Rome (CLARCH 222 — offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (CLARCH 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.


CLARCH 222 / HISTART 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Cameron Blake (ecblake@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clarch/222/001.nsf

A millennium and a half after its collapse, the Roman Empire lives on in the popular imagination. No wonder: at its peak, Rome's empire was the largest the world had yet seen, spanning almost 3000 miles from West to East, with a population of 50 million inhabitants. Its capital was the world's first megacity, a sprawling home to a million people from all walks of life. From the movies we have visions of decadent emperors, fearless gladiators, and the teeming masses screaming for blood at the Colosseum. But what was life in ancient Rome really like?

This course will move beyond the standard stereotypes and explore the history and culture of the city of Rome and its vast empire. Through the objects the Romans left behind, such as ruined temples, perfume bottles, imperial portraits, and soldiers' helmets, we can use art and archaeology to reconstruct the story of ancient Rome and the experiences of daily life in the Empire. Beginning with Rome's lowly origins as a small village we will trace its rise and eventual fall, traversing the empire from rainy Britain to the sands of the Sahara. Along the way we will explore such topics as politics and power, life in the army, religion, food and drink, entertainments, and the private life of its subjects. The readings and illustrated lectures will provide a broad overview, while weekly discussion sections will focus on specialized topics. There are no prerequisites for the course. Your grade will be based on two 1 hour-long exams, one final exam, and your section participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 323. Introduction to Field Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan E Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clarch/323/001.nsf

*Indiana Jones? Lara Croft?*

Admit it, you always wanted to be an archaeologist when you grew up. This course is designed to build on these enthusiasms, while also radically expanding your notions about just what archaeology is and just what archaeologists do. If archaeologists, to put it most simply, study the past, what is left for them to study? Is digging the only way to find things? Who pays for archaeological work, and who owns the goodies we discover? When did archaeology begin? What can we learn about people in the past? What did they eat? How did they die? Why are people entirely willing to murder each other over the fate of archaeological sites? And are real men alone capable of discovering the truth behind all this?

To examine these and other questions, archaeological case studies will be drawn from all over the world, with an emphasis on the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. The course involves lectures three times a week, hands-on sections, three hourly exams and a final project. Local resources, such as the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology and the Exhibit Museum, will be introduced whenever possible.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 384(431) / HISTART 384. Principal Greek Archaeological Sites.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will look in detail at a range of the sites which contribute most to our understanding of Greek society between the Dark Age and Roman periods. In each case we will be exploring the excavated remains, and investigating what these tell us about the role of the site as a whole and about its social and cultural context. The course will build towards an analysis of the different components of the built environment and topography at large, complex sites like Athens, and towards an understanding of how such sites developed through time in response to the changing needs and demands of their inhabitants.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 396. Undergraduate Seminar.

Section 001 — At Home with the Greeks and Romans. Meets with HISTART 489.003.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 489.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CLARCH 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of CLARCH 499, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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This page was created at 7:01 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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